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Warning Signs

NEWS
January 18, 2010
Maryland achieved an odd distinction last week. It was rated by Education Week magazine as having the top education system in the nation for the second year in a row. And it was ranked by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools as having the worst charter school law in the country. It would be easy to dismiss the report by the charter schools advocacy group -- after all, if we're No. 1, why bother with charter schools? But the truth is that even if we are as good as Education Week says we are, that's not good enough, and the details of the rankings reveal weaknesses that will prevent our children from competing fully in the global economy for years to come.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
The newspaper headline - "Middle River Girl Killed by Train" - could have run last week when 14-year-old Anna Marie Stickel was struck and killed by a passenger train while walking to Kenwood High School. But the headline actually ran in May 1968, when 9-year-old Bonnie Louise Calhoun was run over near Martin Boulevard and Old Eastern Avenue - within walking distance of where Anna was killed - by a Pennsylvania Railroad train. Little has changed over four decades on these tracks in eastern Baltimore County, where the nation's busiest passenger rail corridor divides neighborhoods from several schools.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 23, 2009
This is one of those products Gear Girl wishes she did not have to test. But although she is very careful outdoors, she sometimes misses the warning signs ("Leaves of three ... "). The lack of vigilance leads to little red bumps, a rash and the insatiable desire to scratch 24/7 - the calling card of poison ivy. The American Academy of Dermatology estimates that 85 percent of us will develop an allergic reaction if we touch poison ivy, oak or sumac, so finding relief ranks high on the adventure must-have list.
NEWS
By Tony Perry and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 21, 2008
SAN DIEGO - The basic rule for Marine boot camp is simple: Keep your mouth shut and mind your own business. But it's different when the subject is suicide. Drill instructors encourage recruits to share their feelings in so-called "guided discussions," and tell them to watch out for, and promptly report, warning signs in their friends. The suicide rate in the active-duty Marine Corps was 16.5 per 100,000 in 2007 - below the active-duty Army and a similar demographic in the civilian population.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,LSun reporter | October 16, 2007
Baltimore County Council members rejected last night a measure that would have placed the region's toughest restrictions on pit bull owners, siding with dog owners who argued that singling out the breed would be unfair and likely ineffective. By a 6-1 vote, the council killed a proposal that would have required pit bull owners to keep their dogs in concrete-based kennels and post warning signs on their lawns. The author of the proposal, Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, was the only member to vote in favor of it. The proposal, like others across the country, met ardent criticism from dog owners and animal-rights groups, who said laws that single out breeds violate owners' rights and prove costly, while failing to prevent pit bull attacks.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | September 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Bush administration task force recommends screening the riskiest imports to prevent the safety problems that have led to recalls of millions of toys, tires and pet foods this year. The group, in a 22-page report released yesterday, also recommends, as a preventive measure, targeting for closer inspection key weak points in the production and shipment of the $2 trillion worth of clothes, electronics, seafood and other products imported into the United States each year. "Make no mistake, the recent dangers found in some imported products are warning signs to us," said Health and Human Services Secretary Michael O. Leavitt, who led the task force.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | February 8, 2007
After a bizarre case in which an astronaut stands accused of trying to kill an apparent romantic rival, NASA announced yesterday that it would conduct a thorough review of the psychological testing conducted on astronauts. The investigation will also determine whether there were any signs in recent weeks of unusual behavior by Lisa M. Nowak, who was charged Tuesday with attempted murder. Police in Orlando, Fla., say the Naval Academy graduate and Rockville native stalked Air Force Capt.
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