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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A pipe that transports about 17 million gallons of untreated sewage from western Baltimore County to the Patapsco Treatment Plant in the city ruptured Sunday and continues to overflow into the Patapsco River. In response, the Anne Arundel County Health Department has ordered the closing of the river in Brooklyn, from Annapolis Road downstream, according to a news release. The department has posted signs advising against direct water contact and advises people who do come in contact to launder clothes and wash skin immediately with soap and warm water.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
An inmate at a Western Maryland state prison tested positive for the bacterium that causes Legionnaires' disease, prompting an investigation of the facility's water and air-conditioning systems, corrections officials said Friday. The inmate, a man in his 40s, had been sent from Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown to Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore, where he was found to be carrying legionella bacteria. The bacteria are found in warm water and can cause Legionnaires' disease, marked by a cough, high fever, muscle aches and headache.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
An inmate at a Western Maryland state prison tested positive for the bacterium that causes Legionnaires' disease, prompting an investigation of the facility's water and air-conditioning systems, corrections officials said Friday. The inmate, a man in his 40s, had been sent from Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown to Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore, where he was found to be carrying legionella bacteria. The bacteria are found in warm water and can cause Legionnaires' disease, marked by a cough, high fever, muscle aches and headache.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
Record-high water temperatures and a March sewage leak are contributing to a large algae bloom in the Baltimore harbor, bringing what is known as a "mahogany tide" of reddish-brown algae to the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River. The bloom is somewhat earlier and more severe than usual, scientists say, despite the fact that a developing drought has limited runoff pollution from feeding algae growth. Water testing conducted by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources shows skyrocketing levels of chlorophyll, the molecule plants use to turn sunlight into energy, and plummeting levels of oxygen in waters near Brooklyn and Cherry Hill.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
A woman in a red bikini danced giddily on a big floating trampoline in the Magothy River, at one point turning a graceful back flip — without losing her straw hat. Her apparent carefree delight captured what fans consider the true spirit of Bumper Bash, a yearly convergence of boat-borne revelers. But on Saturday, the men in blue were no less a part of the story at the party's fifth-annual installment. Spurred by multiple fights and drunken rowdiness last year, authorities stepped up the police presence considerably, both along the Dobbins Island beach and in the river.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES | November 20, 2005
The Dominican Republic has been attracting stars. And here is a chance to visit the Puntacana Resort and Club, whose owners include Oscar de la Renta and Julio Iglesias. (Mikhail Baryshnikov also has a vacation home in the area.) At $85 a person a night (taxes included), for at least three nights (until Dec. 23), you can have one of 175 deluxe rooms at the club, with daily breakfast and dinner as well as a credit for up to $100 a room for beverages (including alcohol). Details: 888-442-2262; puntacana.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2006
A friend who suffers from arthritis swims two miles several times a week. She swims in colder lap pools, even though she says the warm water feels great. She says colder water is actually better for people suffering from arthritis. Is that true? Arthritis is hardly a one-size-fits-all disease. In fact, there are more than 100 types of arthritis, says the Arthritis Foundation. Roughly 70 million people nationwide suffer from some type of arthritis or chronic joint systems. The answer to the question depends on the type of arthritis and the fitness level of the exerciser.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Capt. Peter Dressler backed the 23-footer into position, taking the slack out of the anchor line and settling the stern on the edge of a current rip in the shadow of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant."
SPORTS
By Mike Kobus and Mike Kobus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 1999
The sizzling weather and recent drought have produced ideal bay conditions for the Atlantic Blue Crab. The lack of fresh rainwater has allowed the ocean to permeate the bay, increasing the saline content, which crabs love.And the soaring temperatures have warmed the water, resulting in very active crabs. Perhaps the drought of '99 was a welcome change for the crabs, because there is no longer mention of a shortage.While crabbing on the Eastern Bay on Monday, I encountered a sight that commonly occurs in late August when the bay is at its warmest.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1998
Tiny one-celled fossils dug up from centuries-old mud at the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay are leading some geologists to a startling conclusion: The bay has been getting steadily warmer for about 300 years, they say.In the beginning, the warming was due entirely to natural causes, say researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey in Reston, Va. But in the past 100 years, they've found, the rate of warming has increased.The researchers are trying to extend knowledge about bay conditions to the era before colonists came here from Europe.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A pipe that transports about 17 million gallons of untreated sewage from western Baltimore County to the Patapsco Treatment Plant in the city ruptured Sunday and continues to overflow into the Patapsco River. In response, the Anne Arundel County Health Department has ordered the closing of the river in Brooklyn, from Annapolis Road downstream, according to a news release. The department has posted signs advising against direct water contact and advises people who do come in contact to launder clothes and wash skin immediately with soap and warm water.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
A woman in a red bikini danced giddily on a big floating trampoline in the Magothy River, at one point turning a graceful back flip — without losing her straw hat. Her apparent carefree delight captured what fans consider the true spirit of Bumper Bash, a yearly convergence of boat-borne revelers. But on Saturday, the men in blue were no less a part of the story at the party's fifth-annual installment. Spurred by multiple fights and drunken rowdiness last year, authorities stepped up the police presence considerably, both along the Dobbins Island beach and in the river.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | July 3, 2007
Scott Durbin was fortunate. The water was warm, the seas calm and the Coast Guard just nine miles away when he decided to dive off the side of a cruise ship near the Bahamas late Sunday night. The 28-year-old Rockville man survived the 36-foot plunge, and the Coast Guard plucked him from the ocean 50 miles east of Boca Raton, Fla., an hour later. Durbin and three friends apparently boarded the Carnival Liberty in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., at 11 a.m. Sunday, and he began drinking before its 5 p.m. departure for Freeport in the Bahamas, according to Judy Orihuela, a spokeswoman for the FBI's Miami office.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2006
A friend who suffers from arthritis swims two miles several times a week. She swims in colder lap pools, even though she says the warm water feels great. She says colder water is actually better for people suffering from arthritis. Is that true? Arthritis is hardly a one-size-fits-all disease. In fact, there are more than 100 types of arthritis, says the Arthritis Foundation. Roughly 70 million people nationwide suffer from some type of arthritis or chronic joint systems. The answer to the question depends on the type of arthritis and the fitness level of the exerciser.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES | November 20, 2005
The Dominican Republic has been attracting stars. And here is a chance to visit the Puntacana Resort and Club, whose owners include Oscar de la Renta and Julio Iglesias. (Mikhail Baryshnikov also has a vacation home in the area.) At $85 a person a night (taxes included), for at least three nights (until Dec. 23), you can have one of 175 deluxe rooms at the club, with daily breakfast and dinner as well as a credit for up to $100 a room for beverages (including alcohol). Details: 888-442-2262; puntacana.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
Three times a week, for an hour at a time, Joan Lewis-Scott escapes the lingering effects of two back surgeries as well as the trauma of Lou Gehrig's disease by floating in a pool of warm water where everything seems possible. Lewis-Scott normally must use a wheelchair, but one recent day Breanna Tennessen, pool manager of the Community Center in Severna Park, saw Lewis-Scott walk through the water at the therapy pool. That night, Tennessen said, "I went home ... and I cried." Such scenes are playing out at this dedicated therapy pool, the only publicly accessible facility of its kind in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | July 3, 2007
Scott Durbin was fortunate. The water was warm, the seas calm and the Coast Guard just nine miles away when he decided to dive off the side of a cruise ship near the Bahamas late Sunday night. The 28-year-old Rockville man survived the 36-foot plunge, and the Coast Guard plucked him from the ocean 50 miles east of Boca Raton, Fla., an hour later. Durbin and three friends apparently boarded the Carnival Liberty in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., at 11 a.m. Sunday, and he began drinking before its 5 p.m. departure for Freeport in the Bahamas, according to Judy Orihuela, a spokeswoman for the FBI's Miami office.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
Record-high water temperatures and a March sewage leak are contributing to a large algae bloom in the Baltimore harbor, bringing what is known as a "mahogany tide" of reddish-brown algae to the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River. The bloom is somewhat earlier and more severe than usual, scientists say, despite the fact that a developing drought has limited runoff pollution from feeding algae growth. Water testing conducted by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources shows skyrocketing levels of chlorophyll, the molecule plants use to turn sunlight into energy, and plummeting levels of oxygen in waters near Brooklyn and Cherry Hill.
SPORTS
By Mike Kobus and Mike Kobus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 1999
The sizzling weather and recent drought have produced ideal bay conditions for the Atlantic Blue Crab. The lack of fresh rainwater has allowed the ocean to permeate the bay, increasing the saline content, which crabs love.And the soaring temperatures have warmed the water, resulting in very active crabs. Perhaps the drought of '99 was a welcome change for the crabs, because there is no longer mention of a shortage.While crabbing on the Eastern Bay on Monday, I encountered a sight that commonly occurs in late August when the bay is at its warmest.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Capt. Peter Dressler backed the 23-footer into position, taking the slack out of the anchor line and settling the stern on the edge of a current rip in the shadow of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant."
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