Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWarm Springs
IN THE NEWS

Warm Springs

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
By Bethanne Kelly Patrick and Bethanne Kelly Patrick,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Drive south on Interstate 81 into Virginia's Shenandoah Valley and bucolic stretches of highway turn too quickly to congested urban sprawl, while antebellum homes sit cheek-by-jowl with unattractive modern structures. But be patient. After you pass Staunton and head west into what locals call "the valley," you will find Warm Springs, a place where progress nicely coexists with natural beauty. Warm Springs, the Bath County seat, is five miles north of its better-known sister city, Hot Springs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
It's been colder than is normal for this time of year in Maryland, but things are eventually going to warm up. As spring, which officially began Wednesday, gets further underway, Maryland will see a change from cooler-than-normal temperatures to warmer-than-normal temperatures, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national spring outlook report. Most of the continental United States, apart from the Pacific Northwest and Northern Great Plains, will experience warmer-than-usual temperatures in next three months, according to the report released Thursday.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 7, 2003
ELIZABETH "BETH", died at her home on March 4 after a long battle with cancer. She was surrounded by the family she loved. Beth had been living in Wilmington, DE to be near her daughter, Carolyn Powell Corrozi (Jack Corrozi, Jr.) and two grandsons, Anthony and Dominic. Her son, T. Kevin Powell lives in Columbia, MD. Beth grew up in Georgia with love and guidance from her parents, Merle Bailey Claxton and E. Jack Claxton, Jr. who reside in Warm Springs, GA. She is also survived by her one sister, Cathi (Len)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Michael Waddell didn't plan on being famous, at least among the hunters who now watch his weekly "Bone Collector" television show on the Outdoor Channel. He never thought about people buying his camouflage hats, T-shirts and other merchandise. He still can't believe that he has his own trademark muzzleloader with his now-recognizable logo engraved on it. "I never even really had a dream of being a television personality," Waddell said last week in Frederick, where he was one of the main attractions at the National Rifle Association's Great American Hunting and Outdoor Show.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | April 20, 1995
As a sort of postscript to last week's ceremonies on the 50th anniversary of Franklin D. Roosevelt's death, consider this snapshot. Versions of it flanked President Clinton when he spoke at Warm Springs, Georgia. It is possibly the most reproduced portrait of FDR. There is a reason for that. It conveys at a glance the essential FDR.The picture was taken near the Little White House in Warm Springs on April 4, 1939. FDR was sitting in a convertible especially fitted with hand controls so that he could drive.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 13, 1995
YESTERDAY was not only the 50th anniversary of Franklin D. Roosevelt's death at the Little White House in Warm Spring, Ga. It was also the 40th anniversary of one of the most significant events in medical history.Before I remind you what that was, let me remind you why FDR was in Warm Springs in the first place.The president was stricken with poliomyelitis in 1921. Polio was an infectious disease that struck whole communities from time to time. There was no known cure for it or protection against it. When an epidemic occurred, panic often ensued.
NEWS
By Sara Engram HTC | September 15, 1996
WARM SPRINGS, Ga. -- Walk the paths of the Little White House here and the pine-scented breeze lends clarity to the debate about whether a memorial to President Franklin D. Roosevelt should depict him in a wheelchair or wearing leg braces. It also suggests that there is a larger point to FDR's encounter with polio and his love of this rustic retreat.Show a president's physical disabilities? Some Roosevelt family members cite the fact that the great man took pains to hide the extent of his handicap -- an effort that was greatly aided by a cooperative press.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | May 28, 2005
THE DRILL routine signaled right off that this was going to be a success story. A dozen young horses and mostly young riders - clearly all pleased with themselves - trotted boldly, if a bit awkwardly, through their figure-eights. Old Glory and the Nevada state flag fluttered at the lead of each column, while Lee Greenwood's "God Bless the U.S.A." boomed in accompaniment. But for barbed wire and armed guards, this performance might have opened an amateur horse show before an audience of beaming parents and friends.
FEATURES
By Lynne Muller and Lynne Muller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 1996
Spotlighting the surface of the crystalline pool with a bright patch of turquoise, sunshine pours through the circular roof of the women's bathhouse at Warm Springs, Va.A few bathers float in and out of sunshine and shadow as the sun's rays penetrate to the rocky bottom of the clear spring water. The bathhouse, which has stood here since 1826, is illuminated in soft green light.Next door is the 1761 men's bathhouse, the oldest spa structure in America.I soak up history along with iron, calcium and bicarbonates.
NEWS
By JOAN HENNESSY and JOAN HENNESSY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2005
He was old. And stiff. And troubled by rheumatism. But in 1818, Thomas Jefferson took to the waters of Warm Springs, Va., and found the experience to his satisfaction. To this day, the springs where he bathed are called the Jefferson Pools. In those days, people didn't talk about stress management or letting go or good karma. But they believed, as many believe today, that the springs are therapeutic. When you're neck deep in steamy water, they say, a fundamental truth becomes clear: Finally, something you crave may actually be good for you. For many of us, the reasoning works.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 27, 2012
Further news of note for beachgoers: This could be a bad year for stinging nettles in the Chesapeake Bay, a University of Maryland scientist says. Maggie Sexton, with the UM Center for Environmental Science , has been checking for jellyfish daily in the Choptank River at the Horn Point Environmental Laboratory near Cambridge. "The conditions are right to have a large population," she said. "We saw the first one two weeks ago, and now we're starting to see one every day," she said.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 17, 2007
In symmetrical fashion, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has followed up last week's overture-violin-concerto-symphony program with another. Adding to the connection, the soloist last week was the ensemble's concertmaster; the soloist this time is the associate concertmaster. Completing the similarity: sensitive and, in some cases, revelatory music-making. The BSO performs at 8 tonight and 3 p.m. tomorrow at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $15-$57. Call 410-783-8000 or go to bsomusic.
NEWS
By JOAN HENNESSY and JOAN HENNESSY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2005
He was old. And stiff. And troubled by rheumatism. But in 1818, Thomas Jefferson took to the waters of Warm Springs, Va., and found the experience to his satisfaction. To this day, the springs where he bathed are called the Jefferson Pools. In those days, people didn't talk about stress management or letting go or good karma. But they believed, as many believe today, that the springs are therapeutic. When you're neck deep in steamy water, they say, a fundamental truth becomes clear: Finally, something you crave may actually be good for you. For many of us, the reasoning works.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | May 28, 2005
THE DRILL routine signaled right off that this was going to be a success story. A dozen young horses and mostly young riders - clearly all pleased with themselves - trotted boldly, if a bit awkwardly, through their figure-eights. Old Glory and the Nevada state flag fluttered at the lead of each column, while Lee Greenwood's "God Bless the U.S.A." boomed in accompaniment. But for barbed wire and armed guards, this performance might have opened an amateur horse show before an audience of beaming parents and friends.
TRAVEL
By Bethanne Kelly Patrick and Bethanne Kelly Patrick,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Drive south on Interstate 81 into Virginia's Shenandoah Valley and bucolic stretches of highway turn too quickly to congested urban sprawl, while antebellum homes sit cheek-by-jowl with unattractive modern structures. But be patient. After you pass Staunton and head west into what locals call "the valley," you will find Warm Springs, a place where progress nicely coexists with natural beauty. Warm Springs, the Bath County seat, is five miles north of its better-known sister city, Hot Springs.
NEWS
March 7, 2003
ELIZABETH "BETH", died at her home on March 4 after a long battle with cancer. She was surrounded by the family she loved. Beth had been living in Wilmington, DE to be near her daughter, Carolyn Powell Corrozi (Jack Corrozi, Jr.) and two grandsons, Anthony and Dominic. Her son, T. Kevin Powell lives in Columbia, MD. Beth grew up in Georgia with love and guidance from her parents, Merle Bailey Claxton and E. Jack Claxton, Jr. who reside in Warm Springs, GA. She is also survived by her one sister, Cathi (Len)
TRAVEL
By Diana Friedman and Diana Friedman,Special to the Sun | October 1, 2000
When a friend heard that my husband and I were planning a vacation with our two young children in Berkeley Springs, W.Va., she was surprised. "Isn't that the spa / resort town where people go for romantic interludes and relaxing getaways?" she asked. Well, yes. Berkeley Springs is known for its upscale spas, budget-busting accommodations and eclectic art galleries, but it's also family-friendly and affordable if you know where to look. The more I learned about this small town just two hours from Baltimore, the more convinced I became that it could be an ideal family destination.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Michael Waddell didn't plan on being famous, at least among the hunters who now watch his weekly "Bone Collector" television show on the Outdoor Channel. He never thought about people buying his camouflage hats, T-shirts and other merchandise. He still can't believe that he has his own trademark muzzleloader with his now-recognizable logo engraved on it. "I never even really had a dream of being a television personality," Waddell said last week in Frederick, where he was one of the main attractions at the National Rifle Association's Great American Hunting and Outdoor Show.
TRAVEL
By Diana Friedman and Diana Friedman,Special to the Sun | October 1, 2000
When a friend heard that my husband and I were planning a vacation with our two young children in Berkeley Springs, W.Va., she was surprised. "Isn't that the spa / resort town where people go for romantic interludes and relaxing getaways?" she asked. Well, yes. Berkeley Springs is known for its upscale spas, budget-busting accommodations and eclectic art galleries, but it's also family-friendly and affordable if you know where to look. The more I learned about this small town just two hours from Baltimore, the more convinced I became that it could be an ideal family destination.
SPORTS
By Lonny Weaver and Lonny Weaver,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 1998
David Navarre made a long cast that barely kept his quarter-ounce Rattletrap crankbait wet and began a fast retrieve. Twenty feet from the north shoreline of Mattawoman Creek, a nearly 4-pound largemouth bass nailed the lure with the force of waterborne tank.The fish peeled line from Navarre's reel and put a huge bend to his graphite rod, but this battle's outcome was a sure bet. As the bass was pulled within reach of the boat, professional bass guide Dale Knupp dipped a net under the beautiful bronzeback and hoisted it aboard.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.