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By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 14, 2001
WASHINGTON - While the nuclear arms cuts pledged by President Bush yesterday seem dramatic, many of the 4,000 or so strategic warheads Bush promised to remove over the next decade already had been earmarked for retirement. And the president also made it clear that only "operationally deployed" missiles would be counted, meaning that those being serviced or repaired would be off the roster. The remaining 1,700 to 2,200 strategic warheads would still be an effective deterrent, and missiles based on submarines would enable the United States to retaliate even if a first strike wiped out its land-based fleet, arms experts say. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, visiting the United States for talks with Bush, did not identify yesterday what cuts his country would make, saying only that it would respond "in kind."
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
A flatbed truck pulled away from the port of Baltimore last week carrying uranium once packed into nuclear warheads aimed at the United States. The shipment, bound for a processing plant in Kentucky, marked the end of a 20-year collaboration to convert weapons-grade uranium from roughly 20,000 dismantled Russian warheads into fuel for commercial power plants in the United States. But the event, heralded by U.S. and Russian officials as a milestone in nuclear nonproliferation, also served as a reminder that hazardous and radioactive materials frequently pass through Baltimore via its busy port without fanfare or notice to the public.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 24, 1998
UNITED NATIONS -- The first physical evidence that Iraq loaded deadly VX nerve gas into missile warheads before the 1991 war in the Persian Gulf has strengthened the resolve of the United States and its allies to maintain the embargo on Iraqi oil sales, diplomats said yesterday.U.N. weapons inspectors excavated warhead fragments in March from a weapons dump at Nibai, Iraq, and shipped them to the Army laboratory at Aberdeen. The laboratory found significant traces of VX, an agent so toxic that a few droplets can kill.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
President Barack Obama is facing the first big test of his post-midterm-election presidency in his effort to get a new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty ratified by the Senate during the lame-duck session of Congress. In the real world, the stakes are enormous: our relationship with Russia; the chance for meaningful sanctions against the rogue states of Iran and South Korea; the effort to reduce the number of nuclear weapons that could one day go astray — all ride on it. Unfortunately, the view looks different in the crucible of Washington, where Republicans are looking at the matter as determining whether Mr. Obama is still a force to reckoned with in the wake of the Democrats' devastating midterm election losses or if he is a weakened president going into the final two years of his term.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 20, 1993
After years of silence, Russia has acknowledged that one of the boldest U.S. spy missions of the Cold War succeeded in recovering two nuclear warheads from a Soviet submarine that had exploded and sunk in Pacific waters more than three miles deep.It is the first time Russia has said that the West captured any of its nuclear arms.The warheads were recovered in 1974 by a U.S. vessel, the Glomar Explorer, a panel of Russian scientists said in a report to President Boris N. Yeltsin.The basis for the statement was not given by the report's authors, who simply say it is of Russian origin.
NEWS
By N.Y. Times News Service | June 7, 1993
KIEV, Ukraine -- In a blunt expression of differences between Russia and the United States over policy toward nuclear weapons in Ukraine, Russian Defense Minister Gen. Pavel S. Grachev yesterday criticized an American plan to place Ukraine's warheads under international control.Speaking to reporters after a meeting with Defense Secretary Les Aspin in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, General Grachev said the nuclear warheads left in Ukraine after the breakup of the Soviet Union are Russian and should remain under Russian control.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 19, 1991
TEL AVIV, Israel -- Four missiles carrying conventional warheads struck Tel Aviv this morning, hitting empty buildings and causing no deaths.Army officials said there were only five minor casualties -- injuries caused by flying glass and sprained ankles."
NEWS
November 18, 2001
PRESIDENTS Bush and Putin did not make a disarmament agreement at their three-day summit. They aligned unilateral policies in a way that President Bush says makes agreements unnecessary, while Russia's president still wants them. Each had campaigned in his own country for reducing nuclear warheads, for cost savings. Now they have come together. If the number of U.S. warheads goes from something like 4,000 to the neighborhood of 2,200, the United States could still destroy all the targets the Pentagon has identified in Russia or any other country, with nuclear explosives launched from air, sea and land.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 12, 1994
Ukraine will give up 1,800 nuclear warheads if Russia promises to give up Ukraine.John and Lorena Bobbitt do deserve to get rich from their alleged crimes. They have entertained the nation.There is no assurance that if the Atlantic Alliance goes to war in Bosnia, it will be on the same side.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In preparation for President Bush's State of the Union address next week, the White House and the Pentagon are considering plans to sharply reduce or eliminate long-range nuclear missiles with more than one warhead, administration officials said yesterday.Some of the cuts, most likely to be in U.S. land-based multiple-warhead missiles, would be made without conditions, while others would hinge on the response of the four former Soviet republics with long-range nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,Los Angeles Times | October 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Air Force weapons officers assigned to secure nuclear warheads failed on five separate occasions to examine a bundle of cruise missiles headed to a B-52 bomber in North Dakota, leading the plane's crew to unknowingly fly six nuclear-armed missiles across the country. That August flight, the first known incident in which the U.S. military lost track of its nuclear weapons since the dawn of the atomic age, lasted nearly three hours, until the bomber landed at Barksdale Air Force Base in northern Louisiana.
NEWS
October 5, 2007
On the 50th anniversary of America's wake-up call to the Soviet missile threat, we wondered: Is the U.S. once again asleep as Russia rearms? Our next surprise might be more than a beeping sphere. On Oct. 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first artificial satellite into orbit. Sputnik was just a 184-pound sphere emitting a radio signal. But it changed the perceived balance of power and may have elected a president. Our next leader may be faced with another new crisis by a new Russia armed with state-of-the-art weaponry and ambitions reflected in its recent planting of a flag on the Arctic floor to buzzing the U.S. with a revamped strategic bomber fleet.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 2007
WASHINGTON --The Bush administration is expected to announce this week a major step forward in the building of the country's first new nuclear warhead in nearly two decades. It will propose combining elements of competing designs from two weapons laboratories in an approach that some experts argue is untested and risky. The new weapon would replace the nation's arsenal of aging warheads, with a new generation meant to be sturdier, more reliable, safer from accidental detonation and more secure from theft.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2003
MOSCOW - Russian lawmakers put off yesterday the ratification of a treaty to reduce the strategic nuclear arsenals of the United States and Russia, a delay signaling Moscow's disapproval of Bush administration plans to wage war in Iraq. The Kremlin has regarded passage of the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty, which would cut arsenals to fewer than 2,200 warheads during the next decade, as a vital part of relations between Washington and Moscow. In autumn 2001, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin convinced President Bush of the need for a binding pact to cut back nuclear arms, which Bush contended could be accomplished with a handshake deal.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Three top Bush administration officials hinted yesterday that they might consider allowing Saddam Hussein to find a haven outside Iraq if that would avoid a war, even as they rejected calls for a delay in confronting him militarily. Asked if such haven could mean a lack of war crimes trials, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld suggested that he "would recommend that some provision be made so that the senior leadership in that country and their families could be provided haven in some other country.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 2002
MOSCOW - The wholesale reduction of strategic nuclear weapons announced yesterday might help sustain the slow-motion momentum of Russia's realignment toward the West, and it might give the architect of that realignment, President Vladimir V. Putin, a political lift at home. But beyond the staggering size of the reductions - 4,000 warheads, give or take a thousand, for each side - the latest exercise in strategic diplomacy between what used to be two superpowers seemed only to seal the victory of one, the United States.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- With his new nuclear arms-cutting proposals, President Bush broadly responded last night to a spreading conviction that Washington and Moscow should go far beyond the treaty they signed with much fanfare July 31.In Congress and among the think tanks and arms control advocacy groups here, it is argued that multibillion-dollar annual savings can be realized by radically reducing the arsenals of thermonuclear weapons and the vehicles that deliver...
NEWS
By Ivo H. Daalder and James M. Lindsay | January 17, 2002
WASHINGTON -- President Bush announced a widely praised decision in November to unilaterally slash the size of the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal. His proposal, which would cut the number of U.S. warheads from 7,000 weapons today to between 1,700 and 2,200 warheads a decade from now, was intended to fulfill his campaign promise to "leave the Cold War behind." Two months later, the bloom is coming off the Bush plan. Just last week, the Pentagon made public the main conclusions of the yearlong classified review it undertook to fill in the details of Mr. Bush's vision.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 2002
WASHINGTON - The United States and Russia forged a historic treaty yesterday that would require both nations to slash their nuclear arsenals by two-thirds over the next decade. President Bush, who plans to sign the treaty in Moscow next week, said it would "liquidate the legacy of the Cold War." With little advance word, Bush appeared outside the White House to make the announcement, hours after U.S. and Russian diplomats completed months of negotiations. The two sides had been eager to strike a deal in advance of Bush's visit to Russia.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. and Russian officials claimed progress toward a nuclear arms deal yesterday, but the two sides failed again to complete the agreement that the nations' leaders hope to sign at a summit in Moscow in three weeks. After a session with Russian Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov, U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said that some sticking points remain and acknowledged that the deal might not be completed in time for signing at the summit. Powell said that if the agreement is completed in time, "fine.
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