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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
Giant Food Inc. hired more than 100 temporary warehouse workers yesterday in an attempt to get its shelves better stocked, particularly with Giant brand products.As the strike by truck drivers of Teamsters Local 639 dragged into its fourth week, the region's largest supermarket chain continued to resume operations at its warehouse, baking and dairy facilities.A line of 300 people stretched outside Giant's Landover headquarters in response to $10.75 per hour jobs advertised in Sunday newspapers.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Lyndon Anthony Wilkinson, a warehouse worker and avid football fan, died of complications from sarcoidosis Oct. 17 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Joppatowne resident was 30. Born in Wichita, Kan., he was the son of Ezra Wilkinson, an electrician and union member, and Gene Archer Wilkinson, a radiologic technician. He grew up in Essex and attended Sandalwood Elementary and Deep Creek Middle schools and was a 2001 graduate of Joppatowne High School, where he played basketball.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1997
As they approach a Nov. 8 contract expiration, Giant Food Inc. and a Teamsters local representing warehouse workers are expected to negotiate some of the same contentious issues that led to a five-week strike by Teamster drivers last winter.Giant said negotiations will resume with two scheduled sessions this week, but said the most intensive talks traditionally have taken place shortly before the contract expires. As always, the company will be stocking its stores in case of a strike, said Barry Scher, Giant's vice president of public affairs.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
It's not every day that a major corporation announces that it will bring 1,000 jobs to Baltimore City, so we have reason to cheer Amazon.com's decision to open a 1 million square foot distribution center here. Baltimore's official unemployment rate stands at 10.8 percent, and if you count people who have dropped out of the workforce, it's much higher than that. We need any jobs we can get. Meanwhile, the establishment of a physical presence for the company here means that Amazon will have to start charging sales tax on Marylanders' purchases, and while we all may rue the end of that loophole in the tax collection system, it's a good thing both for Maryland-based retailers and for the state treasury.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Ross Hetrick and Michelle Singletary and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | August 13, 1991
Negotiations will resume tomorrow in an effort to end a strike by beer truck drivers and warehouse workers who walked off their jobs Sunday night at a southwest Baltimore distributor, an attorney for the company says.Norman R. Buchsbaum, a labor attorney for Bond Distributing Co. says the company and representatives of Brewery Workers Local 1010, a Teamsters affiliate, have agreed to meet at Cross Keys Inn tomorrow . Bond distributes beer to customers in Baltimore and Baltimore County.Buchsbaum says he will be meeting with the union and representatives of Bond and Winner Distributing Co., another major beer distributor in town.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
The International Ladies Garment Workers Union refused to participate in Thursday's election for representation of the Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. Joppa warehouse workers.The company said that 314 employees are eligible to vote, but theunion has challenged that number through the National Labor Relations Board, saying that the figure is closer to 275.The NLRB in Washington will rule on the validity of Thursday's election.More than 800 people work for Merry-Go-Round at the Joppa location, but none is represented by a union.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
After a call from the leaders of several international unions, Giant Food backed off yesterday from hiring temporary workers to staff its warehouse during a strike by Teamster truck drivers."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
Giant Food Inc.'s warehouse workers overwhelmingly approved a 3 1/2 -year contract yesterday that protects jobs, improves health benefits and pensions and guards against unsafe production standards, union leaders and management said.Workers voted 614 to 23 to ratify the contract for more than 1,000 employees at warehouses in Landover and Jessup, averting what would have been the second strike in a year against Giant."We won job security, our top priority," Roy Essex, secretary-treasurer of Teamsters Local 730, said after the vote at a Teamsters hall in Washington.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
Warehouse workers at Merry-Go-Round Enterprises distribution center in Joppa will go to the ballot box Thursday to decide whether to have union representation.The number of workers taking part in the vote is a major concern for the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, which wants to represent the MGRE employees.Although the company said 314 employees are eligible to vote, the union challenged that number through the National Labor Relations Board, saying that figure is closer to 275. The challenge is pending before the NLRB in Washington.
BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Ross Hetrick and Norris P. West and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | August 12, 1991
A union striking a southwest Baltimore beer distributor plans to ask beer drinkers in the Baltimore area to boycott certain brands in reaction to the proposed permanent replacement of 90 truck drivers and warehouse workers.Members of Brewery Workers Local 1010, a Teamsters affiliate, struck the Bond Distributing Co. at 11 o'clock last night, saying that negotiations had not progressed since their contract expired June 30. They said the company's plan to use replacement workers is an attempt to break their union.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Twenty Giant Food workers will be laid off by the end of the month after a dry-goods warehouse in Jessup that supplies Giant stores closes, union locals representing workers said Monday. Warehouse operator Jessup Logistics LLC said in April that it was shutting down the warehouse and laying off about 250 people. The subsidiary of New Hampshire-based C&S Wholesale Grocers said it would save about $13.5 million a year by shifting the distribution work to a more technologically advanced facility in York, Pa. Giant, the region's largest grocery chain, outsourced the dry-goods operation to Jessup Logistics but still owns the center and runs a fresh-foods warehouse as well as the transportation and recycling divisions.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
Giant Food Inc.'s warehouse workers overwhelmingly approved a 3 1/2 -year contract yesterday that protects jobs, improves health benefits and pensions and guards against unsafe production standards, union leaders and management said.Workers voted 614 to 23 to ratify the contract for more than 1,000 employees at warehouses in Landover and Jessup, averting what would have been the second strike in a year against Giant."We won job security, our top priority," Roy Essex, secretary-treasurer of Teamsters Local 730, said after the vote at a Teamsters hall in Washington.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1997
As they approach a Nov. 8 contract expiration, Giant Food Inc. and a Teamsters local representing warehouse workers are expected to negotiate some of the same contentious issues that led to a five-week strike by Teamster drivers last winter.Giant said negotiations will resume with two scheduled sessions this week, but said the most intensive talks traditionally have taken place shortly before the contract expires. As always, the company will be stocking its stores in case of a strike, said Barry Scher, Giant's vice president of public affairs.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
After a call from the leaders of several international unions, Giant Food backed off yesterday from hiring temporary workers to staff its warehouse during a strike by Teamster truck drivers."
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
Giant Food Inc. hired more than 100 temporary warehouse workers yesterday in an attempt to get its shelves better stocked, particularly with Giant brand products.As the strike by truck drivers of Teamsters Local 639 dragged into its fourth week, the region's largest supermarket chain continued to resume operations at its warehouse, baking and dairy facilities.A line of 300 people stretched outside Giant's Landover headquarters in response to $10.75 per hour jobs advertised in Sunday newspapers.
NEWS
July 19, 1995
A Baltimore County man who works at a Ferndale warehouse was rushed to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore on Monday morning after a three-quarter-ton cargo box slipped off a forklift and struck him on the head, county police said.Mark Steven Eltringham, 31, of the 8100 block of Dundalk Ave. was in critical but stable condition at Maryland Shock Trauma last night, a hospital spokeswoman said. Mr. Eltringham was working for Forward Air Inc. in the 800 block of Airport Park Road in Ferndale when the accident occurred about 12:20 a.m., police said.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | January 9, 1994
Guarded optimism best described the mood of nearly a dozen Merry-Go-Round warehouse workers leaving the Joppa distribution center late Wednesday in the wake of reports that the clothing supplier faces serious financial problems.The beleaguered specialty retail clothier has been negotiating with major creditors since early December in an attempt to avoid a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing.For nearly a year, Merry-Go-Round has been stymied by slumping sales and earnings. The company also took on new debt as it acquired a major competitor.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | January 9, 1994
Guarded optimism best described the mood of nearly a dozen Merry-Go-Round warehouse workers leaving the Joppa distribution center late Wednesday in the wake of reports that the clothing supplier faces serious financial problems.The beleaguered specialty retail clothier has been negotiating with major creditors since early December in an attempt to avoid a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing.For nearly a year, Merry-Go-Round has been stymied by slumping sales and earnings. The company also took on new debt as it acquired a major competitor.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
The International Ladies Garment Workers Union refused to participate in Thursday's election for representation of the Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. Joppa warehouse workers.The company said that 314 employees are eligible to vote, but theunion has challenged that number through the National Labor Relations Board, saying that the figure is closer to 275.The NLRB in Washington will rule on the validity of Thursday's election.More than 800 people work for Merry-Go-Round at the Joppa location, but none is represented by a union.
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