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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
Wholesale clubs have gone from warehouse to doghouse.Once hailed for their merchandising muscle, the sprawling members-only stores have staggered through several months of flabby sales. Stock prices in the major wholesale club companies have plummeted, and analysts have vied to see who can cut earnings estimates fastest and deepest.Skeptics see the slide as an indication the concept was overrated from the start. They note that a counterattack by the nation's grocers has slowed the clubs' drive for food sales.
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BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | January 24, 2008
With imports surging, the first load of giant rolls of glossy paper have begun filling a new $26.3 million state-built warehouse in South Locust Point. As stevedores worked to transfer 5,550 rolls weighing as much as 7,000 pounds each from a Finnish freighter - a three-to-four-day job - port officials and executives of Finnish paper maker M-real yesterday said the new warehouse was already paying off with added business for the Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore. Increased shipments from M-real and another Finnish paper company, UPM-Kymmene Corp.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
Price Club officials are asking Baltimore County to redefine their business -- a move that could open thousands of acres in the county to membership warehouse stores.County planners support the change, which would allow Price Club to build on property zoned for business rather than manufacturing, as currently required."We view the Price Club as a retail use. These should be in business zones," planner Jeffrey Long of the Office of Planning said Tuesday at a zoning hearing.But some community members are concerned about the change.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Earnest and Leslie Earnest,Los Angeles Times | July 13, 2007
Alfredo Cardona of Santa Ana, Calif., has always liked buying his clothes at Nordstrom, but lately he's switched to Burlington Coat Factory, where the prices are lower. The 24-year-old financial adviser said he now shops "anywhere you can save." And he's not alone. Retailers posted moderate sales results for June yesterday as shoppers kept spending but tried to get more for their money. Wall Street celebrated the sales report with major gains yesterday, seeing evidence that the retail economy was not collapsing amid a nationwide housing downturn.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1995
Hechinger Co. absorbed a third consecutive month of poor sales, the Landover-based home improvement chain reported yesterday, all but conceding that spring, its most important season, was wiped out.Overall sales in June dropped 8 percent to $255 million, compared with the same month last year. June sales in stores open at least a year fell 7 percent, after declines of 8 percent in May and 10 percent in April."We've had a difficult spring," Vice President Richard S. Gross said. "Basically, spring did not happen for us."
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1995
The financial dry spell continued in July for Hechinger Co. as the Landover-based home improvement chain yesterday reported a fourth consecutive month of anemic sales.Overall sales for the period that ended July 29 dropped 9 percent to $177 million, compared with the same month last year. July sales in stores open at least a year, a bellwether of performance because it factors out new stores, fell 6 percent, after declines of 7 percent in June, 8 percent in May and 10 percent in April."I have no reason to change my opinion -- the company is having a difficult time, but it's doing the best it can," said analyst Kenneth Lucas of Johnston, Lemon & Co. in Washington, D.C. "The retail environment is not that good.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Horn and Patricia Horn,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
Sales at Hechinger Co. stores open at least one year climbed 6 percent in August, the company reported yesterday, an improvement that pleased both its executives and analysts.The big surprise was the Hechinger Stores division of the Landover-based company, a leading home improvement retailer. Sales at those established stores rose 7 percent over the same period last year. Those stores, centered in Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, D.C., have faced stiff competition from Home Depot Inc.Same-store sales at Home Quarters Warehouse stores, the division Hechinger has been expanding most aggressively, rose 4 percent over last August.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
Hechinger Co., the 133-store home improvement chain, said yesterday that its profits rose 31 percent in its fourth quarter, excluding the cost of store closings, as revamped outlets attracted more customers and its mid-Atlantic operation enjoyed its first increase in operating profits in three years.The Landover-based company also announced that its 75-year-old chairman, John W. Hechinger Sr., was relinquishing his day-to-day responsibilities while keeping the position of chairman in a "nonexecutive" capacity.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
With a new store making its official debut tomorrow, Landover-based Hechinger Co. is facing competition by altering its sales strategy.In the process, the chain is begging an essential question in the home-improvement market: Is it a warehouse or isn't it?Hechinger's newly renovated store, located in Glen Burnie along Ritchie Highway near the state Motor Vehicle Administration headquarters, certainly has taken on some of the qualities of a warehouse establishment.The aisles have been widened, the suspended ceilings have been removed to make room for higher shelves, and the shelves -- like warehouse stores -- have been stacked with what looks like more merchandise than the standard Hechinger's has carried.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Earnest and Leslie Earnest,Los Angeles Times | July 13, 2007
Alfredo Cardona of Santa Ana, Calif., has always liked buying his clothes at Nordstrom, but lately he's switched to Burlington Coat Factory, where the prices are lower. The 24-year-old financial adviser said he now shops "anywhere you can save." And he's not alone. Retailers posted moderate sales results for June yesterday as shoppers kept spending but tried to get more for their money. Wall Street celebrated the sales report with major gains yesterday, seeing evidence that the retail economy was not collapsing amid a nationwide housing downturn.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | September 2, 2006
ATLANTA -- Home Depot has rolled out a steady stream of attempts to juice up customer service in its cavernous stores - self-checkouts, huge cash awards, even orange rubber bracelets designed to inspire its orange-aproned crew. In its latest move, the home improvement retailer is going back to the basics: putting more help in the aisles. Home Depot said in its recent quarterly earnings announcement that it is adding 5.5 million hours to store schedules for the fall and winter, a period in which it typically scales back - though what that means for the average store is hard to tell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 1, 2006
The philosopher Roland Barthes called photographs remnants of an absent past, a species of semi-magical sign denoting something that once was, but that is no longer. Absence and loss are the subject of Mitch Epstein's Warehouse, 2000, one of the Baltimore Museum of Art's newest acquisitions. Senior contemporary art curator Darsie Alexander purchased the picture last year for the museum's photography collection with funds from a grant provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. The 30-by-40-inch color image, which seems to depict an array of anonymous objects in an anonymous room in some anonymous city, exudes an almost ineffable sadness, like the poignance of a memorial.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
A slowdown in consumer spending that worsened after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks left a majority of national retail chains with dismal sales last month - the weakest performance of any September in three decades. Many of the national chains, which reported monthly sales yesterday, warned of weaker-than-expected third-quarter profits and said they'd been forced to trim expenses and cut back on inventory. Sales rose a modest 0.8 percent in September, led by Wal-Mart Stores Inc., which posted a 6.3 percent sales gain in stores open at least a year, according to the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi's index of 78 chain stores.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2000
In a bid to tap into a resurgence in the urban retail market, a Connecticut-based developer wants to build the city's first "big box" shopping center on a former rail yard in Port Covington, an estimated $50 million project that could bring up to 600 jobs. Starwood Ceruzzi is proposing a 400,000-square-foot waterfront center anchored by two warehouse-style superstores on Cromwell Street in South Baltimore, the company said yesterday. The developer has a contract with CSX Corp. to purchase about 45 acres on part of a peninsula east of Hanover Street, but has not yet closed the deal, Ken Goldberg, a Starwood Ceruzzi senior vice president, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1999
Mondawmin Mall, a West Baltimore landmark and the city's oldest shopping mall, will be spruced up and expanded with a large new supermarket and a warehouse-size specialty chain, mall representatives said yesterday.The mall's owner, Rouse Co., will build a 58,000-square-foot grocery store on the southern edge of the center and, in a second phase of development, construct a 132,000-square-foot store at the northwest corner, said Brian K. Gardiner, vice president and general manager for Mondawmin.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Suzanne Loudermilk and Kevin L. McQuaid and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
The Cordish Co. of Baltimore confirmed yesterday that it and partner Heritage Properties Inc. have acquired the derelict Hutzler's building in downtown Towson and begun a $20 million redevelopment of the four-level store.Heritage and Cordish, fresh from the opening of its $25 million Metropolis at the Power Plant entertainment project featuring the Hard Rock Cafe at the Inner Harbor last weekend, say the Towson building will reopen by next summer.Towson Circle, as the project will be known, will contain multiple retail tenants and a two-level Storage USA Inc. mini-warehouse facility on the two upper floors of the vacant building.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 31, 1993
Here we are at the end of another year, so we look back at things that were: the offbeat, sometimes mind-twisting,head-scratching sort of stuff that comes across a columnist's desk and makes life in the Greater Patapsco Drainage Basin unique or, at least, mildly amusing.Discoveries, Part IMike Jaworski's new pizza box. I bet we'll be hearing more about it in 1994.Jaworski, an entrepreneur and inventor, left his job as a computer analyst to market the Space-Saver Box. He figured that, if you take the standard cardboard pizza box, perforate it here and there, rip off the lid, then fold the bottom along the perforations, you can have a convenient, environmentally friendly way of storing leftover pizza.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
A slowdown in consumer spending that worsened after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks left a majority of national retail chains with dismal sales last month - the weakest performance of any September in three decades. Many of the national chains, which reported monthly sales yesterday, warned of weaker-than-expected third-quarter profits and said they'd been forced to trim expenses and cut back on inventory. Sales rose a modest 0.8 percent in September, led by Wal-Mart Stores Inc., which posted a 6.3 percent sales gain in stores open at least a year, according to the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi's index of 78 chain stores.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 30, 1997
MAYBE IT was the poplin suit I got for Easter 1965 that makes me associate this time of the year with below-ground shopping. The basements of Baltimore's vanished downtown department stores housed what were politely called budget stores, featuring overloaded tables, stuffed racks, cut-rate prices and singing cash registers.Occasionally some copy writer would get carried away, as one did in an ad for the long-gone Bernheimer-Leader budget basement: "Below the street, but above the level."Nobody was fooled.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
As it enters its 30th year, Columbia is poised for an office-building boomlet and more warehouse-style retail stores -- making the planned community even more of an "edge city" where suburbanites not only live, but work and shop.At least five developers have plans for large office buildings -- rTC including four in east Columbia and one in Town Center. Also, an extended-stay hotel chain wants to build a hotel in east Columbia.At least three warehouse retailers -- CompUSA, Bikes USA and Crown Books -- are expected in the new Columbia Crossing retail center near the intersection of Route 175 and Snowden River Parkway.
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