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February 6, 2005
Mr. and Mrs. Randy Ware, of Friedens, PA, have announced the marriage of their daughter, Susan Lindsay Ware, to Mr. Robert Scott Gahs, son of Mrs. Marie Gahs and the late Mr. Kenneth Gahs, of Jarrettsville, MD. The wedding ceremony took place on October 23, 2004, at Friedens Lutheran Church. A reception followed at the University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown. After a honeymoon in Hawaii, the couple resides in Frederick, MD.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Creme  will reopen soon with a new look and a new name.  Ezra Tilaye, who owns the Mount Vernon restaurant with his mother, Tegist Ayalew, said that the new concept will be called Ware House 518, a nod to one of the many businesses that have been housed at 518 N. Charles St. over more than a century. Baltimore diners know this address for Louie's Bookstore Cafe and Ixia, the two restaurants that occupied the building's ground-floor space before Ayalew and Tilaye opened Creme, a version of their popular restaurant on U Street in Washington, back in 2010.
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NEWS
June 13, 2004
On June 10, 2004, ANNA T. WARE, of Glen Burnie; devoted wife of Thomas A. Ware, Sr.; beloved mother of Thomas A. Ware, Jr.; dear sister of Theo Kline and Delores Krell; loving grandmother of Roxanna Jorgensen and Bryan Ware; dear great-grandmother of Eden Ware. The family will receive visitors at the Singleton Funeral Home, P.A., 1 Second Avenue S.W. (at Crain Hwy), Glen Burnie, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. on Sunday. The funeral ceremony will be held on Monday at 11 A.M. in the funeral home chapel.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
An 18-year-old man who was shot last month in East Baltimore died on Friday, police said. Gregory Anthony Ware Jr., whose last known address was in the 1000 block of N. Kenwood Ave., was shot in the head at about 8:32 p.m. on Feb. 10 in the 2800 block of E. Eager St. in the Madison-East End neighborhood. He was taken to an area hospital for treatment, and died from his injuries just after 9 p.m. Friday. No suspect or motive have been identified in the shooting, which has been upgraded to a homicide.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
ON May 10, 2003, JAMES D. WARE. On Thursday friends may call at the Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Service, 5151 Baltimore National Pike (Rt. 40) from 3:00 - 8:00 P.M. On Friday the family will receive friends from 11:00 - 11:30 A.M. with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-233-2400.
NEWS
November 17, 1991
Donna M. Ware, historic sites planner for Anne Arundel County, recently signed copies of her newly published book, "Green Glades & Sooty Gob Piles," at Maryland's annual statewide Preservation Conference.The book, which details the region's industrial and architectural past, is published by Maryland Historical and Cultural Publications.Ware led a project team which spent months in the region over a three-year period and covered 775 square miles in order to identify and document historic structures and sites.
NEWS
August 8, 1992
Robert A. Ware Jr., an artist who served as advertising manager for the Baltimore-Washington International Airport, died Monday at his Reservoir Street home of complications of AIDS.Services for Mr. Ware, who was 51, are scheduled for 10:30 a.m. today at the Nutter Funeral Home, 2501 Gwynns Falls Parkway.He managed advertising for the airport since 1987 and earlier operated his own commercial studio, Artpen. Also, he was an artist who did stylized human figures in acrylics, watercolors and pen and ink drawings, and in bronze sculptures.
NEWS
April 8, 2002
Barney G. Ware, a printer with The Sun for more than 30 years, died in an automobile accident April 1 on the Baltimore Beltway. He was 68. Born in West Virginia, Mr. Ware went into the newspaper business after graduating from high school in 1952. He began at a paper in Clarksburg, W.Va., helping printers until he learned the trade, said his wife, the former Ingrid Szegnotat, whom he married in 1986. He was drafted into the Army in the 1950s and served for two years in Germany. In the early 1960s, Mr. Ware worked as a printer in California for a year or two and then began at The Sun, where he spent the rest of his career, with the exception of about six months with the federal government's printing office.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
The fathers of two murder victims wept on the witness stand yesterday as they told an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court jury that will decide whether to execute their daughters' murderer how his crimes shattered their families.On Monday, the same jury convicted former Navy seaman Darris A. Ware, 28, of first-degree murder in the fatal shootings of his ex-fiancee Betina "Kristi" Gentry, 18, and her friend, Cynthia V. Allen, 22, in the Gentry home in Severn.The same 10 men and two women turned their attention to sentencing yesterday.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | January 29, 1995
It was a little-noted and seemingly inconsequential transaction this off-season that perhaps best illuminated the minor-league image of the Canadian Football League.On Jan. 16, the near-destitute Ottawa Rough Riders attempted to waive 1989 Heisman Trophy winner Andre Ware so they would spared his 1995 salary (an estimated $145,000) and would allow the quarterback to join the NFL expansion Jacksonville Jaguars.Ware likely will turn up with the Jaguars, but his release from the CFL represents what's wrong with the league.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 4, 2013
Ceramic artist Brian Beckenheimer admits that after owning As the Wheel Turns, a store in Harborplace for 27 years, and doing art shows for 34 years, "I was totally burned out. " He sold his house in Owings Mills last year and took the year off, moving to Arizona to be with his grown daughter, a hairstylist, and doing no pottery. Eight months later, he reconsidered. "I just got so bored with doing nothing," said Beckenheimer, 57, who now lives in Mount Washington and rents studio space with several kilns in a Woodberry-area warehouse that also houses several cabinetmakers and an architectural model maker.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Brickell and For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
On Saturday, crowds of people will gather at St. John's Church in Charles Village to experience the eighth annual Pile of Craft. It is, organizers say, a different sort of craft show. About 50 vendors will be there selling items in a variety of media, including paintings, plush toys, soaps, repurposed clothing and pottery. Michael Bracco, one of the founding members of the Charm City Craft Mafia, which organized the event, said that while he mostly targets 18- to 35-year-olds, he also finds unexpected customers for his Spaghetti Kiss science fiction-themed apparel at the show.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
ESPN college football analyst Andre Ware said on “College Football Live” Wednesday that he expects Maryland to be one of the country's “bounce back” teams in 2013. Pointing to the return of quarterback C.J. Brown and the emergence of wide receiver Stefon Diggs, Ware said that “anything short of a bowl game will be a disappointment.” Calling Diggs “one of the most underrated” players in the country, Ware added Maryland to a list that includes Missouri and Miami.  Ware pointed to the fact that the Terps were 4-2 before a rash of season-ending injuries to Brown and freshmen quarterbacks Perry Hills and Caleb Rowe led to Maryland losing its last six games.
BUSINESS
Nick Tann, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
In case you forgot it's April Fools day, Google is there to remind you. Today's top " cold searches " will return you to the 90's with  Y2K , Pogs hologram slammers , Macarena step-by-step and prom scrunchies making you want to jump jumping like a mac daddy. In other trends this fine, slap-happy morning, Game of Thrones returns to its legion of fans after a ten month hiatus, Pope Francis calls for peace on Easter and Louisville fans recover from witnessing guard Kevin Ware break his leg on live TV. *shutter* Luckily, Google is displaying an "Image Not Available" icon for that last search result.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
CBS Sports made a good call Sunday in not showing a halftime replay of a gruesome injury to Louisville guard Kevin Ware. The injury took place in the first half of Louisville's Elite Eight matchup with Duke. But the network did show it in slow-motion replay while Ware lay on the court attended to by trainers and medical personnel. To its credit, the network had one of the game announcers warn viewers before they showed it. I saw the play live, and I did not notice Ware's fall.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Walking through a giant hall in the Baltimore Convention Center, Susan Johnson and Sherry Mills stopped to admire a bronze-and-steel sculpture with water cascading out of it. "I need this," Mills said. "You may want to come around this side first," Johnson said, nodding at a sticker announcing the water feature's $18,000 price. The sculpture by San Francisco artist Michael Szabo was among the many pricey items at the American Craft Council show this weekend. Others among the 650 crafts people at the event were showing high-end jewelry, paintings, furniture and glassware, with prices reaching into the tens of thousands of dollars.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1995
A crime scene expert told a Howard County Circuit jury yesterday that the former Navy seaman accused of shooting to death two women in a Severn home in 1993 should have had blood on his clothes when he was arrested aboutis Ware should have had blood on his gloves and on his ski jacket if he had been the shooter of the two women about 12:30 p.m. Dec. 30, 1993.Betina Kristi Gentry, 18, and Cynthia Allen, 22, were found dead about 1 p.m. in the home Ms. Gentry shared with her mother in the 1900 block of Bastille Court.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1999
A 28-year-old one-time Navy seaman who had wanted to became a Maryland state trooper was sentenced to death yesterday -- for a second time -- for the murders of his former fiancee and her friend.Darris A. Ware stood stone-faced as somber jurors read a decision they reached after two tense hours of haggling and discussion in a jury room at the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court House. Theirs is the first jury-imposed death sentence in the county in more than 30 years, lawyers said. The only other sentences they might have chosen were life and life without the possibility of parole.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 27, 2012
Here's a harrowing case covered in the New York Times today : The Federal Trade Commission accused seven computer rental companies of using special software to record images (via webcam) and other personal information through computers their customers rented. The companies took pictures, video, screenshots and more from the computers of people who were renting their devices. People were recorded having sex. Children were recorded, too. On Tuesday, the companies agreed to a settlement with the FTC, the agency said . A company called DesignerWare designed the software, with a hidden feature called Detective Mode, and sold it to several rent-to-own stores.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Rear Adm. Robert Waring McNitt, a naval officer whose career spanned two wars and who, after retiring from the Navy, was dean of admissions at the Naval Academy for more than a decade, died Sunday of heart failure at the Ginger Cove retirement community in Annapolis. He was 97. The son of an industrial engineer and a homemaker, Robert Waring McNitt was born and raised in Perth Amboy, N.J., where his interest in boats and sailing began as a youngster. He was a teenager when he and a brother built a dinghy, which they enjoyed sailing on nearby Raritan Bay. As a teenager, he achieved the rank of Eagle Scout.
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