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Ward Museum

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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
The Board of Public Works gave Salisbury State University the green light yesterday to take over the Ward Museum, a financially troubled Eastern Shore tourist attraction known for its collection of decoys and other wildfowl art. Under the agreement, Salisbury State will pay the Ward Foundation $1 and assume the museum's $1.6 million in debt so that it can take control of the 25-year-old institution. The university will acquire the Salisbury waterfront museum and its 4.2 acres of grounds, valued at $4.7 million, along with an art collection valued at $4 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
Bob Byrnes writes: A young lady, Anna Koliais , is trying to put together some information for the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum on Martin and his relation to the outdoors. There are bits and pieces about his hunting, fishing and conservation work in several places, but nothing that pulls it all together. Do you know of anyone she could talk to about Glenn Martin and his outdoors exploits? He moved his plant to Maryland because he was familiar with the Chesapeake Bay from hunting trips.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Melanie Seitz and Melanie Seitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2004
Two shiny black eyes peek through the opening of the green plants. Those eyes belong to beaver Buddha, one of the residents of the Salisbury Zoo (755 South Drive, 410-548-3188 or www.salisburyzoo.org). Curious, he moves slowly to get a better look at whom he is greeting. He climbs carefully up the fence of his cage. In the process, Buddha exposes his significantly large and furry belly. He received his name from the woman who raised him in her bathtub. Now he seems happy to have a more natural environment to satisfy his curiosity.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
JANICE LYNNWINAZAK, 46 of Salisbury, lost her bravely fought battle with cancer on, Sunday, July 31, 2005. Born in Baltimore, MD, she was the daughter of the late George Grossman and Eunice "Jackie" Goldberg of Gainesville, FL. She was the daughter-in-law of Walter and Joan Winazak of Dover, DE. She is survived by her loving husband Dale Winazak of Salisbury; step-mother, Rosie Grossman and her children of Baltimore, brother-in-law and his wife, Wayde...
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
FIXED FOREVER, in a glass case in a unique museum in Salisbury is one of nature's wildly compelling moments:Like some avenging fury, a fierce-taloned hawk has swooped to skewer its prey, a gorgeous pheasant whose every feature contorts with panicked attempts to avoid its fate.One tail feather is in the hawk's grip. Another millisecond and the anguished fowl, it seems, must explode in a flurry of feathers and blood.To me the tableau, one of a gallery-full of masterful wood sculptures at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, is a favorite, recalling poet Gary Snyder's terse, ecological line:"The hawk, the swoop and the hare -- all are one."
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | April 17, 1994
Some of the finest wildfowl artists in the world will bring their latest avian artworks to the Ocean City Convention Center next weekend for the premier wood-carving event of the year -- the Ward World Championship."
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1994
Salisbury -- The first two wooden ducks in the catalog for the National Antique Decoy Auction came to the attention of the museum when a Delaware resident brought them for appraisal in a plastic bag.Auctioneer Richard Oliver, who will conduct the two-day auction, for which the festivities begin Friday, is still astonished. There they were, a rare pair of Ira Hudson teals, in the original paint, in a plastic bag.Their owner had found them in his attic and wanted to know what they'd bring at auction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randi Kest | July 23, 1998
Shore art"Painters of the Eastern Shore," a display of more than 60 works of regional art, and six generations of one family's art from the Parsons andHanks collection will be shown tomorrow through Sept. 20 at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art in Salisbury. The public can meet artists featured in both exhibits at a reception tomorrow from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art is at 909 S. Schumaker Drive in Salisbury. Museum hours are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for nonmembers.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
Bob Byrnes writes: A young lady, Anna Koliais , is trying to put together some information for the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum on Martin and his relation to the outdoors. There are bits and pieces about his hunting, fishing and conservation work in several places, but nothing that pulls it all together. Do you know of anyone she could talk to about Glenn Martin and his outdoors exploits? He moved his plant to Maryland because he was familiar with the Chesapeake Bay from hunting trips.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
JANICE LYNNWINAZAK, 46 of Salisbury, lost her bravely fought battle with cancer on, Sunday, July 31, 2005. Born in Baltimore, MD, she was the daughter of the late George Grossman and Eunice "Jackie" Goldberg of Gainesville, FL. She was the daughter-in-law of Walter and Joan Winazak of Dover, DE. She is survived by her loving husband Dale Winazak of Salisbury; step-mother, Rosie Grossman and her children of Baltimore, brother-in-law and his wife, Wayde...
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2005
Waterfowl decoys, long ago used by Native Americans who made them of reeds to lure ducks and geese into their nets, now trap much richer fare: Decoys attract about $12 million from collectors at auctions each year. The leading auction house for decoys, Guyette & Schmidt Inc., is moving its headquarters to St. Michaels on Maryland's Eastern Shore from Farmington, Maine, this month. The owners of the auction company, which sells $10 million worth of the decoys a year, said they were drawn by a warmer climate and lower taxes, but also the state's premier role in the craft.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melanie Seitz and Melanie Seitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2004
Two shiny black eyes peek through the opening of the green plants. Those eyes belong to beaver Buddha, one of the residents of the Salisbury Zoo (755 South Drive, 410-548-3188 or www.salisburyzoo.org). Curious, he moves slowly to get a better look at whom he is greeting. He climbs carefully up the fence of his cage. In the process, Buddha exposes his significantly large and furry belly. He received his name from the woman who raised him in her bathtub. Now he seems happy to have a more natural environment to satisfy his curiosity.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
The Board of Public Works gave Salisbury State University the green light yesterday to take over the Ward Museum, a financially troubled Eastern Shore tourist attraction known for its collection of decoys and other wildfowl art. Under the agreement, Salisbury State will pay the Ward Foundation $1 and assume the museum's $1.6 million in debt so that it can take control of the 25-year-old institution. The university will acquire the Salisbury waterfront museum and its 4.2 acres of grounds, valued at $4.7 million, along with an art collection valued at $4 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randi Kest | July 23, 1998
Shore art"Painters of the Eastern Shore," a display of more than 60 works of regional art, and six generations of one family's art from the Parsons andHanks collection will be shown tomorrow through Sept. 20 at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art in Salisbury. The public can meet artists featured in both exhibits at a reception tomorrow from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art is at 909 S. Schumaker Drive in Salisbury. Museum hours are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for nonmembers.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
FIXED FOREVER, in a glass case in a unique museum in Salisbury is one of nature's wildly compelling moments:Like some avenging fury, a fierce-taloned hawk has swooped to skewer its prey, a gorgeous pheasant whose every feature contorts with panicked attempts to avoid its fate.One tail feather is in the hawk's grip. Another millisecond and the anguished fowl, it seems, must explode in a flurry of feathers and blood.To me the tableau, one of a gallery-full of masterful wood sculptures at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, is a favorite, recalling poet Gary Snyder's terse, ecological line:"The hawk, the swoop and the hare -- all are one."
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1994
Salisbury -- The first two wooden ducks in the catalog for the National Antique Decoy Auction came to the attention of the museum when a Delaware resident brought them for appraisal in a plastic bag.Auctioneer Richard Oliver, who will conduct the two-day auction, for which the festivities begin Friday, is still astonished. There they were, a rare pair of Ira Hudson teals, in the original paint, in a plastic bag.Their owner had found them in his attic and wanted to know what they'd bring at auction.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2005
Waterfowl decoys, long ago used by Native Americans who made them of reeds to lure ducks and geese into their nets, now trap much richer fare: Decoys attract about $12 million from collectors at auctions each year. The leading auction house for decoys, Guyette & Schmidt Inc., is moving its headquarters to St. Michaels on Maryland's Eastern Shore from Farmington, Maine, this month. The owners of the auction company, which sells $10 million worth of the decoys a year, said they were drawn by a warmer climate and lower taxes, but also the state's premier role in the craft.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | June 26, 1994
Salisbury -- The next time you put a stamp on an envelope, look before you lick. If it's a duck stamp, you may have just seen the work of wildlife artist Maynard Reece.Mr. Reece is the only person to ever win the federal duck-stamp contest five times, and his work is now on display at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art."It's his first one-man show in eight years, and we are so pleased to have it," says Sheri Olsen Kelly, the museum's public relations coordinator.A stroll through the gallery showing Mr. Reece's pieces -- paintings and sketches -- offers a quiet respite from summer heat and noise.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | June 26, 1994
Salisbury -- The next time you put a stamp on an envelope, look before you lick. If it's a duck stamp, you may have just seen the work of wildlife artist Maynard Reece.Mr. Reece is the only person to ever win the federal duck-stamp contest five times, and his work is now on display at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art."It's his first one-man show in eight years, and we are so pleased to have it," says Sheri Olsen Kelly, the museum's public relations coordinator.A stroll through the gallery showing Mr. Reece's pieces -- paintings and sketches -- offers a quiet respite from summer heat and noise.
FEATURES
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | May 8, 1994
Baltimore is a city that thinks like a small town.I like it that way.Everything I need is in Baltimore: a great library, some peaceful bars and plenty of neighborhood ethnic restaurants. There are parks and boats and people everywhere.Like many visitors from outside Maryland, I have seen the National Aquarium, walked about in Fells Point, shopped at the Gallery at Harborplace.But to get the complete picture of Maryland, residents as well as out-of-state visitors should see a bush sculpted like a teacup, walk along a Civil War battlefield, try to retrieve a space satellite and taste one of the area's best barbecue sandwiches.
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