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War Zone

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NEWS
By Donna Nesbitt | September 23, 1992
Mothers cry, cameras rollLives go onThe list of don'ts grows longDon't sit on your stepsDon't go out night or dayDon't play inside or outYou will have no protectionHere in BaltimoreYour blood could flowAnd cameras will roll
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NEWS
September 14, 2014
I am outraged! On Sept. 11, 2014, I had to get to page 15 of The Sun to read a small article about the New York commemoration of the Sept. 11 attacks. The front page had the Ravens, the Pride of Baltimore II, President Barack Obama's speech on ISIS (at least you valued the president and know that the Middle East is still a war zone), Baltimore's youth curfew and a Lifebridge ad. But no story about 9/11! Page 2 had Dan Rodricks article about NFL Commissioner Roger Goodall.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | August 25, 1992
MIAMI -- Laurice Smith didn't know what else to do, so sh decided to run a hoe across her kitchen floor.The hoe was for the mess left behind after Hurricane Andrew ripped through southern Florida, killing at least 11 people with its 160-mph gusts of wind. Mrs. Smith raked up the remnants of the storm's fury: a soggy pile of newspapers, broken glass, attic insulation and a small white phone."I have to do something," Mrs. Smith said. "We did not know where to start."She could have started anywhere in what was left of her two-story yellow house.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 4, 2014
Matthew VanDyke, the self-styled "Arab Spring Freedom Fighter" from Baltimore, was a friend of the two American journalists who were beheaded by Islamic State militants. VanDyke met James Foley and Steven Sotloff during his travels in Libya, and it was Foley to whom he first confided what we all later came to learn - that VanDyke was neither a journalist nor a filmmaker when he was captured and held in a Libyan prison for six months in 2011. Instead, he had gone there to fight with the rebels who eventually overthrew dictator Muammar Gaddafi.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Military analogies are inevitable.Norman P. Blake Jr., chairman of USF&G Corp., returned from South Florida on Tuesday evening, shaking his head over the destruction he witnessed from the nation's costliest natural disaster. "It's like in a war zone," he said.Mr. Blake's purpose was to review his troops, boost the morale of a few dozen people working under exhausting conditions and meet with customers whose lives have been disrupted. "I walked away from there saying, 'God, the courage and capacity of these people to maintain their dignity,' " he said in an interview this week.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 19, 1991
KHOBAR, Saudi Arabia -- Like the elusive desert oasis that evaporates in the imagination and then reappears moments later, life in a war zone is full of deceptions and surprises.Iraqi tanks pretend to surrender and then blast their way into a deserted Saudi border town. U.S. pilots attack mobile Scud missile launchers only to find they've hit decoys.With some regularity, Army scouts are telling of nights when the enemy troop movements they were watching turned out to be a wandering herd of camels.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 12, 1996
NEW YORK -- A United Nations aid agency yesterday accused Sudan's Islamic fundamentalist government of banning food flights to a beleaguered rebel-held war zone, threatening hundreds of thousands with starvation and death.Holding up a photograph of a child with a bloated abdomen and matchstick legs, Catherine Bertini, executive director of the U.N.'s World Food Program, said:"When people look like this, and more and more children are dying any decision not to allow food to reach them is cruel."
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | May 13, 1991
Corean Humphrey spread out a quilt last winter and for two months slept on the floor. She was afraid she'd get shot if she slept in her bed."People talk about having a war in Saudi Arabia," says Humphrey, who lives two blocks south of Bon Secours Hospital. "We were having a war right here on Pulaski and Hollins Street."They shot through my kitchen door. They shot through my neighbor's window . . . I didn't sleep in my bed on account of people shooting. By my windows being low they could have shot through the windows and hit me in bed."
NEWS
By Article by Abigail Tucker and Article by Abigail Tucker,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2007
Balad Air Base, Iraq -- The boy was dying much faster now. His blood pressure had skyrocketed, and his pulse was in the 180s. Standing at the foot of his bed, Dr. Heather Cereste could see his heart shudder in his skinny chest. His father seemed to sense what was coming. It was past midnight, Heather would later recall, and he was still at the bedside of his 6-year-old, who had been shot in the head while playing outside his Baghdad home. The father had been waiting this way for several days, dressed in the same black robe, stroking the boy's shaved head or resting his own head on the child's legs.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
The morning after Baltimore police visited 48 drinking establishments as part of a new nightclub enforcement initiative, residents near one bar in West Baltimore awoke to a spray of gunfire that left two men dead and two others wounded. All four suffered multiple gunshot wounds in what police say may have been a drive-by shooting about 7:30 a.m. yesterday outside 2-Spot Bar at Wheeler Avenue and Calverton Road. None of the victims had been identified yesterday. Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark said yesterday morning's violence underlines the problem with bars and clubs that stay open until 5 a.m. "These things aren't happening outside somebody's house," Clark said yesterday.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
Letter writer Judy Chernak eloquently addresses the realities of fighting a war against a terrorist organization that has enmeshed itself in a civilian population ( "Hamas must give up its rockets before talks can proceed," July 29). Every Palestinian child who dies is considered by Hamas to be a martyr and a worthwhile sacrifice. Their belief system values death over life. Those who sacrifice their lives receive many riches and their families are honored. At the same time, Hamas astutely recognizes that the rest of the world values life over death, and they also realize that the media focus on the civilians who are killed and that grieving families benefits their cause.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | April 1, 2013
April, in these parts, is irresistibly transformative. Vibrant life and color rise up and relentlessly overwhelm a drab winter's landscape, inspiring notions in the human heart of renewal and redemption. And with it comes another baseball season and all its manifestations of new beginnings and the grand possibilities that await in the lush green days ahead. So it was supposed to be 45 years ago. 1968 had dawned with the stunning reports of the Tet Offensive, a sobering reality that stretched deep into March, concluding with a sitting president declining to seek re-election, and bringing to us a reluctant familiarity with places called Khe Sanh, Hue, Lang Vei and My Lai. Our weariness longed for April's explosion of daffodils, bright green leaves, and baseball.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
If you had told me in 2000 that I could find something to admire about President George W. Bush, I would have been astounded. Yet in 2003, when he traveled in secret to Iraq to share Thanksgiving dinner with the soldiers in the war zone, I greatly admired his action. At the time, there wasn't a visitor to Iraq with more of a target on his back. He was not only absent from his own table on the holiday, he put his life in danger to do it. Now, in 2012, I am ecstatic that President Barack Obama has been re-elected.
NEWS
July 23, 2012
I live in northern Baltimore and was without electricity for a week after the recent storm. Our neighborhood looked like a war zone, with trees and power lines down on almost every street. But not once did I or my neighbors get mad at BGE because we realized the scope of destruction caused by the derecho and what a mammoth job the cleanup was going to be. Now the politicians are puffing up their chests and damning BGE to make it look like they are doing something. The dialogue has become an either-or discussion about whether or not to put power lines underground, which would cost a fortune.
NEWS
May 18, 2012
As a resident of the Inner Harbor, I'm shocked by the details of what happened downtown duringSt. Patrick's Day weekend ("The St. Patrick's Day brawl," May 16). And I was also dismayed by how quickly the brawl apparently materialized. However, I'm grateful Maryland's Public Information Act made it possible for your reporter to unravel details as they were happening in real time. I'm just sorry city officials downplayed this violence as it leads to citizen complacency until something serious occurs.
NEWS
May 16, 2012
As a resident of the Inner Harbor, I was shocked to read the details surrounding the St. Patrick's Day "mayhem" ("St. Patrick's Day violence exceeded initial reports, police dispatch tapes show," May 13). I appreciate The Sun report and Peter Hermann 's excellent investigative journalism. Your front page story, accompanied by extensive play-by-play transcripts, was impressive. Also, I'm grateful Maryland's Public Information Act makes it possible to finally learn the details. Perhaps our city government would rather have had the whole sorry matter swept under the carpet.
NEWS
By Kimberly A. C. Wilson and Rob Hiaasen and Kimberly A. C. Wilson and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
Life along this section of Harford Road changed very little this week, despite the sea of blue uniforms and the white squad cars that stayed for days. Business went on. A pastor held his regular prayer service. A jogger kept to his daily run. The drug dealing resumed. But near the spot where Baltimore Police Agent Michael J. Cowdery Jr. was shot dead Monday night, Shirley Jones stood sweeping away surgical gloves left in the street - by medics or investigators - near where the gunman's body fell.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 9, 2003
CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. - The tan combat boots were back on the porch where they belonged, near a soccer ball and toy truck. After seven months, Army Staff Sgt. Dwayne Stone had come home from Iraq to see his wife and son and a 5-month-old baby girl he had never held. But on his first night back at the roomy brick rancher, after the children were asleep, Deiry Stone cried as the couple lay under a flowery comforter. In two weeks, her husband would have to go back to the war zone, and she dreaded it already.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 12, 2012
A Johns Hopkins bioethicist joined other government and health officials in calling on the U.S. Congress to do more to protect doctors in war zones such as Syria. In recent remarks to Congress, Leonard Rubenstein, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics specializing in protection of human rights in areas of conflict, said violations of medical neutrality must have consequences. “Adherence to norms won't take place unless it becomes a diplomatic priority, with the U.S. and other states using their considerable leverage to demand adherence to international law,” he said in a prepared statement.
EXPLORE
By Rebecca Oppenheimer | August 29, 2011
Does the approach of autumn's more rigid schedules and cooling temperatures seem like too much to bear? Give the excitement of summer one last hurrah. Take a vicarious wild ride with these volumes of international thrills. "Outlaws Inc. " by Matt Potter Bloomsbury, $27 Journalist Matt Potter spins a nonfiction tale more suspenseful and compelling than any espionage novel. A decade in the making, "Outlaws Inc. " tells the story of "Mickey" (a pseudonym)
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