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By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Doug Struck, The Sun's national correspondent, has traveled in Israel, Jordan, Iraq and Kuwait covering the war | March 10, 1991
It is difficult to fit the realities of war into the lives of people caught in it. They are such different scales.Baghdad was a weird calm in the days before the war. There seemed an inexplicable faith war would not come, and a resignation that it might. No one I talked to wanted it; there was no passion against Americans, Kuwaitis or anyone else to fuel a fever of war."War is something the politicians bring," said a sweet-faced grocer at a Baghdad fruit stall. "We do not want war."As the clock ticked ominously toward Jan. 15, the people I saw in Baghdad were average people worried about their families.
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Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
Nobody asked me but . . . This news, via MarylandReporter.com, might come as a shock to members of the General Assembly who believe the O'Malley administration is waging a "war on rural Maryland": A poll by OpinionWorks finds that 62 percent of registered voters in rural areas favor tighter regulations on septic systems while 57 percent favor "limiting the number of septic systems in rural areas. " Statewide support for tighter septic restrictions was 72 percent, with support for limiting new systems as 69 percent.
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By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | January 18, 1991
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu called parliament together seven days early today to consider proposals for supporting the U.S.-led war to drive Iraq out of Kuwait.Both houses of the Diet, Japan's parliament, were to hear an emergency address from the prime minister and then to begin debate on his proposals.Striving to avoid the widespread criticism of the indecision that prevailed here for months after Iraq's Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait, Japan activated crisis teams in its Cabinet and Foreign Ministry yesterday.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
Sept. 11, 2001, hangs over the American political scene like one of those mirrored disco balls, shining lights in every direction, its ultimate message hard to discern. No candidate can hope to be elected president without trying to focus one of those beams, finding a meaning to this day of tragedy that can make it part of a compelling narrative of American story. But what part of the story should it be?
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By Gerri Kobren | February 28, 1991
This has been the first war in which "people in Kansas City have [information] as fast as the president does," says Judy Woodruff, chief Washington correspondent for PBS' "MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour." And that phenomenon, she added, in the evenhanded style characteristic of her show, has both a positive and a negative side.Speaking at Westminster Hall, as part of a noontime lecture series sponsored by the University of Maryland at Baltimore, Ms. Woodruff pointed out that television coverage of this war is unprecedented in its immediacy and ubiquitousness.
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By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush said last night that his decision to order American troops into battle against Iraq eight days ago has been justified by Saddam Hussein's response.He also gave the strongest hint so far that one aim of the campaign is to remove Mr. Hussein from power or bring him to justice."Saddam has sickened the world with his use of Scud missiles, those inaccurate bombs that indiscriminately strike cities and innocent civilians in both Israel and Saudi Arabia," Mr. Bush told a gathering of the Reserve Officers Association.
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March 10, 1991
In "43 Days: Images of the War in the Gulf" published last Sunday, the 4th Light Armored Infantry Battalion, Company B, Fort Detrick, which activated 85 of its 93 reservists Nov. 24, was omitted from a list of Maryland units activated in the Persian Gulf war.756th Military Airlift Squadron Andrews 200 Air transportMarine Reserve unitsDet., Engineer Support Company, 4th Marine Reserve, Combat Engineer Battalion Baltimore 19 EngineeringDet., Headquarters and Service Company, 4th Combat Engineer Battalion Baltimore 10 EngineeringRF *The activation of a unit may not involve the entire reserve unit.
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By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun Gilbert A. Lewthwaite, chief of The Sun's London Bureau, contributed to this article | January 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The White House said yesterday that the war in the Persian Gulf will probably take months and continued to hint that toppling Iraqi President Saddam Hussein from power is becoming a central objective.While still vague, it was the first effort at putting any kind of time frame on the war and one that was prompted by grave concern that public expectations for a short, easy battle will quickly sour into disillusionment."We need to get on a kind of even keel in terms of our public psyche that allows us to accept the fact that this is going to last for some period of time," said White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater.
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By Doug Birch | January 18, 1991
Some had fathers or uncles who served in Vietnam, though that was before they were born. Several students had family members or friends who are in the Persian Gulf, or who might go if the fighting continues.Most were thinking hard about a very hard question: Are some things worth dying for?Another generation of American children is being touched by war."I was really scared," said Melissa Silvestri, 14, of Hamilton, recalling the moment she learned that U.S. warplanes were screaming over Iraq.
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By Jim Tankersley and Mark Silva and Jim Tankersley and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A group of congressional Republicans warned President Bush in person this week that their support for the Iraq war could evaporate if conditions don't improve there by September. Eleven GOP moderates, led by Rep. Mark Steven Kirk of Illinois, met with Bush and top administration officials Tuesday to deliver what one participant called a "strong signal" about the dangers that "war fatigue and war weariness" pose for Republicans in the 2008 elections. "I've been to a lot of meetings at the White House," said Rep. Ray LaHood of Illinois, who attended the meeting.
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By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | July 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- For eight months, a quiet battle has raged between two federal agencies that piece together clues of potential terror threats. The feud has left officials without information about potential dangers. And it has persisted despite a White House deadline, which passed last month, to reach a resolution. The dispute is not about the clues, but what to call them. With more than 100 labels in use among the various federal agencies to identify types of unclassified, but sensitive, information -- and who gets access to it -- the Justice and Homeland Security departments were assigned last year what seemed to be a fairly straightforward task: consolidate the list to just a few labels that would be shared by all agencies.
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By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 11, 2003
NAJAF, Iraq - The three hand-drawn feathers on the back of Pfc. Tyrone Roper's Kevlar helmet are not the idle doodles of a bored soldier. They are marks of a killer. Roper, a 26-year-old soft-featured Native American from Canada, has three confirmed kills in the war with Iraq, more than any other member of the 3rd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment. His battlefield feats have made him something of a star in Bravo Company. The comrades who came up with the feather idea pat him on the back, call him Savage and say they wish they could do what he did. Again and again, they ask how it feels to drop an enemy soldier with a pointed 5.56 mm bullet the length of a man's pinky finger.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 4, 2003
MOSCOW - A Russian news Web site has published a report claiming that two former top Soviet military officers visited Iraq less than two weeks before the start of war to advise the Iraqi military leadership. The report, posted Wednesday on the www.gazeta.ru Internet site, showed three photographs of the two former Soviet generals receiving an award from Iraq's defense minister, Sultan Hashem Ahmed. Though the precise nature of the visit was unclear, one of the generals, Vladislav A. Achalov, a former Soviet deputy defense minister, acknowledged in a transcript of a brief telephone interview posted on the site that it had taken place shortly before the war. In the interview, Achalov declined to detail the visit, saying only that he "did not go to drink coffee," and that he and his colleague were "with the minister" less than 10 days before the war began.
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By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - President Bush warned yesterday that Saddam Hussein's regime or its sympathizers might seek to launch terrorist strikes on American soil to retaliate for the U.S.-led war in Iraq. "The dying regime in Iraq may try to bring terror to our shores," Bush said in a speech at a U.S. Coast Guard facility here. "Other parts of the global terror network may view this as a moment to strike, thinking that we're distracted. They're wrong." In fact, he declared, his administration is not "distracted" by war and is acting boldly to protect the homeland even as it wages war in Iraq.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 1, 2003
Less than 12 hours after issuing a statement of support, NBC abruptly fired Pulitzer Prize-winning war correspondent Peter Arnett yesterday as the result of an interview he gave to state-controlled Iraqi TV. And, despite the fact that Arnett just nine days ago was being showcased by NBC and widely praised in the press for his reports on the bombing of Baghdad, there was general consensus within the journalistic community that the action taken by NBC...
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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - Struggling to move beyond its bitter division over war in Iraq, the United Nations Security Council voted unanimously yesterday to give Secretary-General Kofi Annan control over a multibillion-dollar program to provide food and humanitarian relief to the Iraqi population. With money from past Iraqi oil sales, Annan now has the power to restart a system to distribute food from 44,000 relief centers across Iraq that in recent years have been the main source of food for 60 percent of Iraq's 25 million people.
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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 29, 2003
CAIRO - Helmeted riot police stood shoulder-to-shoulder yesterday across a broad boulevard, bracing for the approaching demonstrators loudly denouncing America's war on Iraq. Remarkably, the protestors marching outside Al-Azhar, this city's central mosque, and shouting "Our souls, our blood for Saddam" obediently stopped. After their leaders spoke from the back of trucks, the crowd dispersed. No less remarkable, yesterday's protest was officially permitted. The crowd was able to express its anger at the United States, and the Egyptian government thus diverted criticism from itself.
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