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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon has acknowledged in a new report that chemical weapons were detected as many as seven times in the first week of the 1991 Persian Gulf war near staging areas in northern Saudi Arabia, where tens of thousands of U.S. troops were housed.While insisting that it had no conclusive evidence that U.S. soldiers were ever exposed to Iraqi chemical weapons, the Defense Department said in the report that it was "further exploring the plausibility" that small amounts of chemical agents passed over troops after U.S. bombers destroyed Iraqi arms depots and factories north of staging areas near the Saudi city of Hafr al-Batin.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Joseph F. Nawrozki III, a retired investigative reporter who served on the staff of three Baltimore daily newspapers and was a Vietnam War combat veteran, died of leukemia Saturday at his Bel Air home. He was 70. "Joe had a real instinct for the underdog. He looked into their hearts," said Michael Olesker, a former Baltimore Sun columnist who was Mr. Nawrozki's investigative partner at the old News American. "His working-class background and his experience in Vietnam informed everything he wrote.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Senate approved a $500 million package of veterans benefits yesterday, virtually guaranteeing that Persian Gulf war veterans will get retroactive pay raises for their time in the region.But the five-year plan -- negotiated with a cost-conscious Bush administration -- is less than half of what the House has voted to provide, and less than many senators had hoped to do.The package was part of legislation authorizing emergency funding for Operation Desert Storm, which passed 97-1.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Vincent J. Salkoski, who taught mathematics in Baltimore public schools and was a World War II veteran, died Sept. 3 of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. Vincent Joseph Salkoski was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay, where he was a member of the Curtis Bay Athletic Club. After graduating from Southern High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served as a rifleman and mortarman. He participated in the occupation of China. After being discharged in 1946, he took courses at City College and the Johns Hopkins University to receive his teaching certification.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After years of Pentagon denials, a group of veterans of the Persian Gulf war is offering the first compelling evidence that U.S. troops were exposed to Iraqi chemical weapons. The veterans say that nerve gas and other chemical agents have begun to ravage their bodies.The soldiers and former soldiers were members of the Army's 37th Engineer Battalion. Unlike thousands of other Americans who have complained that they suffer from the ailments collectively described as gulf war syndrome, the men of the 37th can pinpoint the time and place that they believe they were exposed to chemical weapons: 2: 05 p.m. March 4, 1991, when the battalion blew up 33 Iraqi bunkers in the southern Iraqi desert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 8, 2002
Baltimore has memorials to presidents, to poets, to the woman who sewed the Star-Spangled Banner. Now a city known for its monuments and statuary is about to build something new, and a bit off-the-wall: A memorial to a memorial. The Maryland Stadium Authority has approved a contract for construction of a $775,547 structure in the Camden Yards area to honor war veterans. But besides honoring veterans, this design also commemorates the city's last memorial erected in their memory: the recently demolished 33rd Street facade of Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1997
Nearly 100 people commemorated Veterans Day at the Longwell Armory in Westminster yesterday, many of them wearing reminders of their sacrifice.They saluted the flag in respectful silence as a Marine honor guard moved up the aisle. Two young soldiers followed the guard. One carried a red, white and blue wreath; the other held the black flag symbol of America's POWs and MIAs.Aging men and women recited the Pledge of Allegiance in loud voices and joined hands to sing "God Bless America."Russell Shaffer, 79, had pinned a "Pray for America" button on his white and purple cap -- a hat printed with "Commander of the Military Order of the Purple Heart."
NEWS
By HARTFORD COURANT | November 25, 1996
The records U.S. federal agencies relied upon to conclude that Persian Gulf war veterans are no sicker than the general population excluded thousands of veterans treated for illnesses by doctors at federal clinics and by private doctors paid by the government.The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' statistics also do not include other veterans who chose to go to private hospitals or doctors and pay for their own medical care.In an interview last week, Dr. Frances M. Murphy, who is responsible for the Veterans Affairs Department's program to treat gulf war veterans, said the diagnoses of veterans who were treated by clinics and private doctors, rather than at VA hospitals, were left out of the department's computer databases.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
For more than a century, the Greeks of Athens had it all -- power, prestige, wealth. Then, just as quickly, they lost it all, leaving the world one essential legacy -- the democratic principles upon which much of modern civilization is based. "The Greeks: Crucible of Civilization" focuses on a roughly 200-year period, from the birth of Cleisthenes in 570 B.C. to the death of Socrates in 399 B.C. While that represents only a portion of ancient Greek history -- the Olympics, for example, date back to 776 B.C. -- there's no disputing that the events of the period would change the course of world history.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The chairwoman of a federal panel investigating the illnesses of veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf war said yesterday that she believed that the veterans were clearly experiencing more health problems than other veterans, and that Iraqi chemical weapons and other chemical agents might be to blame for many of their ailments.The chairwoman, Dr. Eula Bingham, a toxicologist who is the former head of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, said it was too early to rule out Iraqi chemical or biological weapons as the cause of many of the illnesses of the veterans, given how little was known about the weapons' long-term health effects.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Robert W. Weinhold Sr., a decorated Army Airborne Ranger in the Vietnam War who later worked for several financial institutions, died Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of kidney failure. He was 75. The son of Herman W. Weinhold, a textile millworker, and Mary Alice Weinhold, a homemaker, Robert Winway Weinhold was born and raised in Methuen, Mass., where he graduated in 1956 from Methuen High School. He enrolled at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., where he was captain and quarterback for the university's football team.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Thomas D. Fantom Jr., a retired civil engineer and World War II Army Air Forces veteran, died July 23 at Arden Courts in Pikesville of complications from a fall. He was 91. The son of Thomas D. Fantom Sr., a civil engineer, and Alice E. Fantom, a homemaker, Thomas Davis Fantom Jr. was born on Palmer Avenue in the city's Pimlico neighborhood, and moved with his family to Granite during the Depression. He was a 1940 graduate of Catonsville High School. Mr. Fantom enlisted in the Army Air Forces the day after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 13, 2014
Just two pages into the book "Unbroken," its protagonist is in the water, hiding beneath the deteriorating life raft in which he has been drifting across the Pacific Ocean for almost a month. Overhead, Japanese bombers are circling back to strafe him a second time. And sharks are approaching from below. Death is coming for him from two directions, and your impulse is to verify that this is not a novel, not some outlandish fiction from the Indiana Jones School of Narrow Escapes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Elaine F. Wood, a retired Baltimore County Health Department secretary and World War II veteran, died Tuesday of dysphagia, a swallowing disorder, at her Towson home. She was 98. The daughter of Wesley Fennell, a salesman, and Frances Letetia Stocksdale Fennell, a homemaker, Elaine Fennell was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating in 1933 from Forest Park High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1937 from what was then Western Maryland College. She also studied at Strayer's Business College in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Dr. James Ellicott Tyson Hopkins, a retired thoracic surgeon and decorated World War II veteran who drew on his battlefield experience to advocate for the use of body armor, died of heart failure Monday at his home near Bel Air. He was 99. He served during World War II with a fabled unit, Merrill's Marauders, behind enemy lines in Burma. Born on his family's farm near Highland in Howard County, he was a descendant of Johns Hopkins, the Quaker philanthropist who founded the Baltimore hospital and university.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
William E. Mosley, a retired Maryland Transit Administration subway motorman and World War II veteran, died June 8 of undetermined causes at Manor Care Health Services — Woodbridge Valley in Catonsville. He was 90. William Edward Mosley was born and raised in West Baltimore. After graduating in 1942 from George Washington Carver Vocational-Technical High School, he enlisted in the Army. Mr. Mosley served with the infantry in Africa, Corsica, Italy and France, and was in the second wave of troops landing at Normandy on June 6, 1944.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 1997
IRVINE, Calif. -- A number of medical professionals, who say they have become ill while treating Persian Gulf war veterans, claim the mysterious disease afflicting tens of thousands of soldiers is contagious and could pose a public health threat.Doctors, nurses and laboratory researchers, as well as others who come in casual contact with gulf war veterans, say they have contracted the same symptoms -- fatigue, fever, aches, rashes and respiratory problems -- that are generally associated with "gulf war syndrome."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1996
LEBANON, Pa. -- Two new government studies show for the first time that veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf war are far more likely to suffer from a variety of serious health problems than troops who did not serve in the war, a finding that appears to vindicate ailing veterans who have said that their service in the gulf has cost them their health.The studies -- one conducted by the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the other by the Navy -- do not resolve the mystery of what is making most of the veterans ill.But they clearly show that gulf war veterans are having health problems in unusual numbers and that their illnesses can be disabling, even though they do not necessarily result in hospital admissions or death.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Claude L. Callegary, a retired Baltimore lawyer and World War II veteran who advised five U.S. presidents on veterans' affairs, died June 3 of respiratory failure at the Loch Raven Veterans Administration Living and Rehabilitation Center. He was 92. "Claude was a valued adviser as a founding member of my Veterans Advisory Board," said Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski. "As a veteran, advocate and Marylander, he was a true patriot who always valued service over self. " "He was just a superb national head of Disabled American Veterans for a few years, and that concern continued throughout his life.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Dr. William Howard Adolph, a retired Randallstown-area chiropractor and decorated World War II veteran, died of cancer March 27 at his Owings Mills home. He was 92. Born in Philadelphia and raised in the Idlewylde section of Baltimore County, he was the son of William Taylor Adolph, a salesman, and Gladys Keen Adolph, a homemaker. As a young man, he helped with family finances - his parents had 10 children - by driving a milk truck, delivering newspapers, cutting lawns and singing in a church choir.
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