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By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Flying over Iraq this week, Maryland National Guard Col. David W. Carey surveyed miles and miles of emptiness. Where 500 U.S. bases once housed as many as 170,000 troops, the American military footprint had shrunk to two bases and 4,000 soldiers - all with orders to pack up and move out by the end of month. "It's as if you're going to a ghost town," Carey, commander of the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade, said Thursday from Iraq. "I have instructed and encouraged my soldiers to take it all in, take pictures, write stuff down, keep a journal," he said.
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NEWS
By Michael E. Young and Michael E. Young,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | November 11, 1994
LAUDERDALE LAKES, Fla. -- He looks back 77 years through hTC the comfortable shade of long memory and recalls the faded image of 58 brave young soldiers marching off to win the War to End All Wars.And as the rest of the country celebrates Veterans Day today, 100-year-old Ralph Foster will remember its other name, Armistice Day, and the battles he fought during the first World War.Mr. Foster was little more than a kid in 1917 when the United States joined the fight, just a few years out of high school and more comfortable as captain of the baseball and football teams in Bowling Green, Ohio, than as a soldier in the U.S. Army.
NEWS
July 26, 2009
HARRY PATCH Britain's last World War I veteran Harry Patch, Britain's last survivor of the trenches of World War I, was a reluctant soldier who became a powerful eyewitness to the horror of war, and a symbol of a lost generation. Mr. Patch, who died Saturday at 111, was wounded in 1917 in the Battle of Passchendaele, which he remembered as "mud, mud and more mud mixed together with blood." "Anyone who tells you that in the trenches they weren't scared, he's a damned liar: You were scared all the time," Mr. Patch was quoted as saying in a book, The Last Fighting Tommy, written with historian Richard van Emden.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
Because of an editing error, yesterday's article on surviving World War I veterans had an incomplete first reference to Frank J. Trimble, 99, of Charlotte Hall.The Sun regrets the error.They were young then, most of them teen-agers when they learned names like Verdun, St. Mihiel, Chateau Thierry, Belleau Wood and Meuse-Argonne.Now they are old men with fragmentary, frequently fleeting memories of the soul-searing events that ended 75 years ago today with the Armistice of World War I.As doughboys they marched into battle in their khaki uniforms singing ditties like "Over There," "It's a Long, Long Way to Tipperary," "Mademoiselle from Armentieres" and "Pack up Your Troubles in Your Old Kitbag (and Smile, Smile, Smile)
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | November 21, 2004
THIS MONTH marked the anniversaries of two events ending prolonged periods of conflict and generating the hope that war would no longer be the means to settle disagreements between nations. One was Nov. 9, the day in 1989 when the Berlin Wall fell, foreshadowing the demise of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War that had sapped the treasuries and energies of the United States and the Soviet Union for almost five decades. The other was Nov. 11, called Veterans Day in America, marking the day in 1918 when an armistice ended the Great War, the War to End All Wars, in which millions had perished.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
Henry Gunther of Baltimore died at one minute before the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month - the last soldier killed in the four-year insanity of World War I. This Veterans Day 2008 marks 90 years since the armistice of 1918 and the deaths of Henry Gunther and nearly 3,000 other men - American, British, French, German - whose senseless loss in the final hours form the ultimate metaphor for the bloody lunacy of "the war to end all wars."...
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 7, 1998
LONDON -- Eighty years later, Douglas Thomson can still summon up the smells and sounds of World War I.The military messenger who once ferried orders to British troops dug into trenches along the Western Front is now, at 100, one of the few survivors of a conflict that ended the old order and shaped modern Europe."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | November 11, 1994
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- They are dying at a rate of 20 a day, the last American voices of the First World War.But as they fade away, the surviving U.S. veterans of "the war to end all wars" are fighting a lonely battle to save the national organization that for generations has bound them together.Of the 4.7 million Americans who served in World War I, fewer than 25,000 have endured the march of time and will today mark Veterans Day, which was established in part to remember the end of that conflict in 1918 on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.
NEWS
October 14, 2008
The war in Iraq hasn't been a topic of conversation in many American homes for some time now. For most, a crippled economy, declining home values, job security and shrinking retirement savings are the more urgent concerns of the day. There are few reasons to talk about the Iraq conflict except to perhaps wager a guess on which of the two presidential candidates would best resolve the U.S. involvement there. But the deployment of U.S. soldiers, reservists and national guardsmen to Iraq or Afghanistan remains steady, as 50 families gathered this weekend in Glen Burnie know all too well.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
Henry Gunther of Baltimore died at one minute before the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month - the last soldier killed in the four-year insanity of World War I. This Veterans Day 2008 marks 90 years since the armistice of 1918 and the deaths of Henry Gunther and nearly 3,000 other men - American, British, French, German - whose senseless loss in the final hours form the ultimate metaphor for the bloody lunacy of "the war to end all wars."...
NEWS
October 14, 2008
The war in Iraq hasn't been a topic of conversation in many American homes for some time now. For most, a crippled economy, declining home values, job security and shrinking retirement savings are the more urgent concerns of the day. There are few reasons to talk about the Iraq conflict except to perhaps wager a guess on which of the two presidential candidates would best resolve the U.S. involvement there. But the deployment of U.S. soldiers, reservists and national guardsmen to Iraq or Afghanistan remains steady, as 50 families gathered this weekend in Glen Burnie know all too well.
NEWS
By JEFFREY S. REZNICK | November 11, 2005
Americans today are rightly concerned about the health and safety of our troops engaged in the global war on terrorism. We are equally interested in preserving the legacy of the "greatest generation" of World War II. But as we focus on our soldiers of today and yesteryear, we have largely forgotten our veterans of the "war to end all wars," World War I. They, too, deserve special recognition this Veterans Day because fewer than 40 survive; the death of...
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
They're the last of the last, the dwindling band of living veterans of World War I, the Great War, as it was called, the war to end all wars. It didn't, of course, and today, on the 88th anniversary of the day that the United States entered the war, its veterans are mostly forgotten even as newer veterans, from the current conflict in Iraq, come home. The best estimate is that perhaps 30 World War I veterans are alive in the United States, and that there are 150 survivors worldwide - a thin company left from the 65 million called up to fight the war. They're all very old now, even those who were very young when they went off to fight.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | November 21, 2004
THIS MONTH marked the anniversaries of two events ending prolonged periods of conflict and generating the hope that war would no longer be the means to settle disagreements between nations. One was Nov. 9, the day in 1989 when the Berlin Wall fell, foreshadowing the demise of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War that had sapped the treasuries and energies of the United States and the Soviet Union for almost five decades. The other was Nov. 11, called Veterans Day in America, marking the day in 1918 when an armistice ended the Great War, the War to End All Wars, in which millions had perished.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | November 21, 2004
HAS THERE ever been a war that so many people disapproved of but so few wanted to stop? Have the reasons for starting a war ever been so thoroughly discredited without turning into reasons for ending it? The Vietnam era antiwar movement had an agenda: Bring the troops home. What seems to be today's antiwar position - it was a terrible mistake and it's a terrible mess, but we can't just walk away from it - was actually the pro-war position during Vietnam. In fact, it was close to official government policy for more than half the length of that war. Today's antiwar cause doesn't even have a movement, to speak of, let alone an agenda.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | November 21, 2004
HAS THERE ever been a war that so many people disapproved of but so few wanted to stop? Have the reasons for starting a war ever been so thoroughly discredited without turning into reasons for ending it? The Vietnam era antiwar movement had an agenda: Bring the troops home. What seems to be today's antiwar position - it was a terrible mistake and it's a terrible mess, but we can't just walk away from it - was actually the pro-war position during Vietnam. In fact, it was close to official government policy for more than half the length of that war. Today's antiwar cause doesn't even have a movement, to speak of, let alone an agenda.
NEWS
May 31, 1993
To honor the fallen of the nation's wars is the least that posterity owes them. Some more practical obligations ensue, such as insuring decent education, health and opportunities for the children and heirs of those who sacrificed. But honor and remembrance are not without value.Memorial Day began with decorations of the new graves of the fallen during and after the Civil War and took on a national character in 1868. Antietam battlefield has always been one of the more important sites of commemoration.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2003
About 90 former soldiers from Carroll County gathered yesterday in Westminster for a Veterans Day ceremony that featured speakers revisiting experiences from past and present wars, starting with World War I and ending with Operation Iraqi Freedom. Though long converted into the city's gymnasium, Longwell Armory regained a part of its past with the tribute to the military yesterday. Maj. Thomas Long of the Carroll County Sheriff's Office talked about his "grandpap." Army Lt. John Long arrived in France singing patriotic songs such as "Yankee Doodle" and "Over There," but then endured machine gun fire, artillery barrages and poison gas. John Long survived, but, Thomas Long said, his grandfather's brothers-in-law weren't so fortunate, suffering and later dying from their injuries in the war. "Sadly, it wasn't the war to end all wars," Thomas Long said.
NEWS
November 11, 2003
THE LETTER to the mother of the five soldiers arrived over the president's signature. Mrs. Lydia Bixby, of Massachusetts, lost two of her sons on the battlefield. Her sacrifice was great and the commander in chief was humbled by her loss: "I feel how weak and fruitless must be any word of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save," President Abraham Lincoln wrote on Nov. 21, 1864.
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