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NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | April 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Without fanfare, the Joint Chiefs of Staff have been making gradual changes in the way they watch the world from the windowless command center inside the Pentagon.The changes are supposed to increase efficiency and improve the flow of information throughout the complex -- with fewer people. The military chiefs consider this as much a response to recent budget cuts as an adjustment to the reduced threat of nuclear war.In the "war room" -- actually a maze of secure communications rooms and conference areas that are usually off-limits to outsiders -- it was revealed during a recent visit that staffing has been cut by about 25 percent since 1990.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
At some point in next week's NFL draft, the Ravens will get the itch. It's usually a good itch, and few teams, if any, have been as successful at scratching it as they have been the past two decades. That's why during the draft it has become a question of when, not if, the Ravens will swap one of their picks. They have made at least one trade in each of the past 10 drafts and 14 of 16 overall. Their preference has been to trade down, but they can be aggressive when trying to secure a player they believe is special.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 15, 1994
How important timing is. "The War Room," a documentary on the inner workings of the 1992 Clinton presidential campaign that opens today at the Charles, feels almost like a post-World War II unit tribute, celebrating some regimental combat team or airborne division's charge to glory across occupied Europe. But it has the bad fortune to arrive too late, when the celebrating has stopped and the complexity of the post-war environment has become evident and people are beginning to ask: What did we win?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun TV critic | October 30, 2009
There are three things you should know about the HBO documentary "By the People: The Election of Barack Obama." First, this two-hour film is the document in all likelihood by which the landmark presidential campaign of 2008 will be known to future generations. Think Theodore White's book on the 1960 campaign of John F. Kennedy, "The Making of the President." Second, the documentary is so skillfully crafted that it will transport many viewers back to Nov. 4, 2008, and they will re-experience what they felt on that emotion-charged election night as the returns came in and it was announced that the nation had elected its first African-American president.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | July 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Inside a converted White House conference room that has a feverish buzz of activity and a growing sense of urgency, a fax that ordinarily would have been filed in a trash can instead became a presidential introduction yesterday.The fax in question was a run-of-the-mill news release from Michael Walsh, chairman and chief executive of Tenneco Inc., endorsing President Clinton's economic plan. In the White House "war room" its potential was spotted immediately.The war room, or "boiler room," as some call it, is where veterans of the Clinton presidential campaign are trying to shape public opinion about the president's $500 billion deficit reduction package.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | February 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton may have promised yesterday to shrink the White House staff, but for now he's brought back into the fold the hip and high-powered team that turned his floundering presidential campaign into a smooth and sophisticated hit show.With crisis after crisis entangling his first three weeks in office, Mr. Clinton has enlisted the help of former campaign strategists James Carville and Paul Begala, pollster Stanley Greenberg, and Mandy Grunwald, the media manager and mastermind of the "Arsenio" appearance.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
On the day the "War Room" was unveiled to the public, it scored a big success yesterday. As state and local leaders talked about the War Room, which targets violent repeat offenders, officials got a hit on a database search that let them detain a child abuse suspect with an outstanding warrant. "He could have possibly hit the streets, but because of the War Room's efforts, he will not be released," Robert Thumma, a field supervisor with parole and probation, said of the arrested man, whose name was not released.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
In July last year, after a stray bullet intended for someone else struck a 10-year-old West Baltimore boy in the neck, the gunman was released on $35,000 bond, causing Mayor Martin O'Malley and State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy to publicly point fingers. Police were angry that there wasn't a prosecutor at Perry Spain's bail-review hearing to argue for higher bail. Prosecutors said they weren't notified by the police about the hearing. It's that kind of problem that city authorities are trying to eliminate with the "War Room," a new office where prosecutors, probation agents and pretrial officials will share information about offenders in an attempt to ensure that defendants aren't released prematurely.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 14, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Gore brain trust is huddled inside 2 1/2 rooms just past the donkey doormats on the ground floor of the Democratic National Committee headquarters here, a "war room" so hastily arranged that many of its phone lines don't work, the muck-a-mucks have no private cubicles and no one has even set up a computer. "It looks like one of those dot-coms," says Chris Lehane, campaign spokesman for Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore, the dark circles under his eyes and rumpled sweater making him look like a man who has pulled a few too many all-nighters surfing the Web. Instead, his sleeplessness can be blamed on the nature of this race, which for Gore has moved into Democratic Party headquarters on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the war room where the White House works to mold public opinion in the Arab world, all eyes are turned to March 21. It is the first day of the new school year in Afghanistan, and it promises to be a media event. Will President Bush urge American students to send school supplies and adopt Afghan pen pals? How many headlines can be generated about the arrival of girls in school after the fall of the Taliban, which prohibited their education? Can any U.S. officials get on TV to discuss the image of America among young Muslims?
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 29, 2008
So professional baseball has been played for, what, about 140 years, give or take, and has managed to get along without the technological assistance commonly referred to as "instant replay." Now, suddenly, Major League Baseball has to have instant replay and it has to have it immediately. By immediately, we're talking yesterday. Most fans are aware that replay will be applied only to home runs - fair or foul, over the fence or still in play, fan interference or not. And it might be a good idea in concept, but what's not a good idea is the timing.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Andrew A. Green and Paul Adams and Andrew A. Green,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - Minutes after Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor announced her retirement, 24-year-old Georgetown University graduate Kristin Bateman rushed to her computer in People For the American Way's fifth-floor "war room" and hit the "send" button. Through the miracle of instant messaging, nearly 2,000 of the liberal advocacy group's Washington volunteers received an e-mail urging them to rush downtown and start calling activists in battleground states. Two hours later, the war room's 40 computer stations and 70 phones overlooking M Street N.W. were nearly full, and a conference table was packed with volunteers stuffing envelopes.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
On the day the "War Room" was unveiled to the public, it scored a big success yesterday. As state and local leaders talked about the War Room, which targets violent repeat offenders, officials got a hit on a database search that let them detain a child abuse suspect with an outstanding warrant. "He could have possibly hit the streets, but because of the War Room's efforts, he will not be released," Robert Thumma, a field supervisor with parole and probation, said of the arrested man, whose name was not released.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
In July last year, after a stray bullet intended for someone else struck a 10-year-old West Baltimore boy in the neck, the gunman was released on $35,000 bond, causing Mayor Martin O'Malley and State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy to publicly point fingers. Police were angry that there wasn't a prosecutor at Perry Spain's bail-review hearing to argue for higher bail. Prosecutors said they weren't notified by the police about the hearing. It's that kind of problem that city authorities are trying to eliminate with the "War Room," a new office where prosecutors, probation agents and pretrial officials will share information about offenders in an attempt to ensure that defendants aren't released prematurely.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
Despite a bleak fiscal environment, the state was fairly generous to Baltimore during the most recent legislative session -- providing $789,000 to pay for a "war room" to help prosecutors target violent repeat offenders, as well as more money for playgrounds and drug treatment. And although city officials feared that the state would kill a successful tax credit program that encourages the renovation of old buildings, the state preserved it but imposed a limit on the payouts, Mayor Martin O'Malley told the City Council during a briefing yesterday.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and David Nitkin and Howard Libit and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2002
IT'S BEGINNING to look like a 1998 reunion at Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's Mount Washington headquarters. After complaints that her campaign has failed to spark much interest among the party faithful, the expected Democratic nominee for governor is busily reassembling the crew that engineered Gov. Parris N. Glendening's successful re-election effort. "In the 1998 campaign, we had a great model," said Alan Fleischmann, Townsend's campaign chairman. Peter S. Hamm, spokesman for the 1998 Glendening-Townsend campaign, took over the same role for Townsend yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
Despite a bleak fiscal environment, the state was fairly generous to Baltimore during the most recent legislative session -- providing $789,000 to pay for a "war room" to help prosecutors target violent repeat offenders, as well as more money for playgrounds and drug treatment. And although city officials feared that the state would kill a successful tax credit program that encourages the renovation of old buildings, the state preserved it but imposed a limit on the payouts, Mayor Martin O'Malley told the City Council during a briefing yesterday.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 29, 2008
So professional baseball has been played for, what, about 140 years, give or take, and has managed to get along without the technological assistance commonly referred to as "instant replay." Now, suddenly, Major League Baseball has to have instant replay and it has to have it immediately. By immediately, we're talking yesterday. Most fans are aware that replay will be applied only to home runs - fair or foul, over the fence or still in play, fan interference or not. And it might be a good idea in concept, but what's not a good idea is the timing.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the war room where the White House works to mold public opinion in the Arab world, all eyes are turned to March 21. It is the first day of the new school year in Afghanistan, and it promises to be a media event. Will President Bush urge American students to send school supplies and adopt Afghan pen pals? How many headlines can be generated about the arrival of girls in school after the fall of the Taliban, which prohibited their education? Can any U.S. officials get on TV to discuss the image of America among young Muslims?
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | October 22, 2001
WHEN THE war against international terrorism is over, will the Irish Republican Army remain? Will the Tamil Tigers still slaughter, the Basque separatists deliver bombs to Spanish officials? No doubt all that will remain, to the continuing anxiety of the people of Ireland, Sri Lanka and Spain. Though these groups fight against the legitimate governments of nations with which they are at odds, they keep in touch with counterparts in other lands. They trade arms, explosives, advice. The IRA has gotten much of its financing from sympathetic Americans, and trained its volunteers in Libya.
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