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War In Vietnam

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By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 16, 1992
Today let me tell you what Bill Clinton and I did during the war in Vietnam: We avoided the war in Vietnam.Millions of young American men attempted to avoid Vietnam back then, whether they choose to remember it that way or not so many years later, but Bill Clinton and I actually did it. Back then, Bill avoided the draft with a friendly Arkansas ROTC officer's help, and I managed to avoid the unfriendly officer with the voice like scouring pads at Fort Holabird.The...
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NEWS
By Anthony H. Cordesman | April 1, 2007
The following is taken from a statement delivered Wednesday before the House Armed Services Committee. The author holds the Arleigh A. Burke chair in strategy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. His e-mail is acordesman@aol.com. Nearly half a century ago, I entered the office of the secretary of defense at a time when it was neoliberals who thrust us into a war in Vietnam. Over the years that followed, I saw the same tendency in that war to downplay the risks and threats and internal divisions in the nation where we fought that I see in the way that this administration treats the Iraq war today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Monica Crowley and Monica Crowley,Special to the Sun | March 14, 1999
When American voters went to the polls in November 1968, they could not have realized that they were choosing a president whose administration would initiate the most dramatic changes in U.S. foreign policy since the inception of containment more than 20 years earlier.Richard Nixon's 1968 campaign had curiously little to say regarding foreign policy, compared to his earlier runs for office. He spoke vaguely about ushering in a new era based on cooperation rather than confrontation, an inclination to reconsider American relations with the Soviet Union and China and ending the war in Vietnam.
NEWS
March 21, 2007
Thousands turned out to protest the war in Iraq on its fourth anniversary, not only in Washington but also in cities scattered across the country. Yet their impact was decidedly low-key. When half a million angry demonstrators filled the Mall on Nov. 15, 1969, to demand an end to the war in Vietnam, the nation could not help but take notice. A whiff of something momentous was in the air. Anti-war Americans today seem no less angry, but their protests don't get much traction. It's a different country now. There's no draft, of course, and this may go a long way toward explaining why the turnouts have not been more momentous.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | February 10, 1991
As the crowd gathered for the rally yesterday at Fort McHenry, Ronald Jones and his wife, Suzanne, planted their small sign into the lawn."Never again can we allow our troops to be denigrated," it said.In a nutshell, that was the theme of the two-hour, flag-waving rally, hosted by the American Freedom Coalition of Maryland. Mindful of the antipathy many Americans felt toward the military as the war in Vietnam soured, yesterday's crowd was intent on making sure history won't repeat itself as the United States prosecutes the Persian Gulf war."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | February 13, 1991
Washington--THE GRIM body count calculus is clearly a critical element of President Bush's decision on whether and when to order a ground offensive in the Persian Gulf war. But it also underlines a basic weakness in the president's position -- the fact that the Iraqis do not, and have never, posed a direct threat to the United States.From the outset the White House has understood, first, that popular support for President Bush's conduct of the war was essential to its success and, second, that this support might be threatened if there were heavy American casualties.
NEWS
By Cokie & Steven V. Roberts | August 11, 1995
THE JUXTAPOSITION could not have been more striking: Hiroshima and Hanoi -- two wars with two very different endings, and two very different lessons.The bang that concluded World War II, in addition to ushering in the atomic age and all that implies, taught us anew that victory requires might. In the half-century that's followed we've spent much of our treasure making sure no one is mightier. Candidates soft on defense" have seen their political lives comes to untimely ends. And now in Congress, Republican senators, convinced they can't trust the Defense Department of a Democratic administration, are busy adding more money to the Pentagon budget than the generals have asked for, including funding for Ronald Reagan's missile defense system, Star Wars.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It was easy for members of the Senate to cast crowd-pleasing votes to end the arms embargo against Bosnia. No one can watch the television films of the Serbs' savage "ethnic cleansing" without being horrified.And the notion of the Bosnians being denied the weapons they need to defend themselves is abhorrent. Besides, senators don't have to carry out the policies they set. Their idea of dealing with a problem usually is to hold a public hearing.But it would be a mistake to view the Senate vote as simply a political expression designed by Majority Leader Bob Dole to embarrass the White House and further his own campaign for the Republican presidential nomination.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | June 7, 1994
On December 3, 1969, a young man named Bill Clinton wrote a letter to the director of the Reserve Officers Training Corps at the University of Arkansas. In his letter, the 23-year-old law student explained that he opposed the war in Vietnam and therefore could not, in good conscience, participate in the R.O.T.C. program as he had agreed earlier -- even though reneging on that agreement meant he might be drafted.Wrote young Bill, "Because of my opposition to the draft and the war, I am in great sympathy with those who are not willing to fight, kill, and maybe die for their country (i.e.
NEWS
By Harry G. Summers | March 21, 1991
NOW WHAT? That's the question most of our armed forces are asking, not only those still standing by their guns in the gulf, but those deployed in East Asia and Western Europe as well. For the first time since the end of World War II, there is no immediate mission at hand following the end of hostilities.At the time, the Korean War was seen as a Soviet diversion, with the main attack likely to come in central Europe. Even during the war, the U.S. military sent most of its first-line aircraft and the majority of troops to Europe.
NEWS
By GORDON LIVINGSTON | June 23, 2006
In any discussion of the war in Iraq and its consequences, it is obligatory for everyone to acknowledge the sacrifices required of the men and women who have been sent there. More than 2,500 of them have died and about 18,000 have been wounded. The rate of post-traumatic stress disorder among those who have returned has been estimated to be as high as 20 percent. I was a soldier once in a war similar in many respects to this one. Like members of our current military, I was a volunteer.
NEWS
June 4, 2006
Here is how defense attorney George Latimer put it at the court-martial: "These are the experiences just before they go in: a number of reconnaissance and sweep and destroy missions, without ever seeing an enemy; losses of buddies by mines and snipers; never any security from death for it always came from unseen and unknown sources. ... You never knew when your number was up, and you never knew when the next step might cost you a leg or your life. ... Women and children operating with your enemy, being used to help destroy your unit.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | November 23, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. -- We now have a legitimate comparison between the Vietnam War and what is taking place in Iraq. That comparison was summed up nicely in a Wall Street Journal editorial Friday about the untimely call by Democratic Rep. John P. Murtha of Pennsylvania and a decorated Vietnam veteran, for the withdrawal of American forces from Iraq. The Journal recalled a comment made to historian Stanley Karnow in a 1990 interview by North Vietnamese Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap: "We were not strong enough to drive out a half-million American troops, but that wasn't our aim. Our intention was to break the will of the American government to continue the war."
NEWS
By Paul Moore | July 25, 2004
FOR MONTHS, readers have written and called seeking updated information about the number of U.S. soldiers killed and wounded in Iraq. Their e-mails and phone messages convey an urgency that transcends politics or opinions about the war itself. They express a desire for information and for articles that reflect the sacrifices and struggles of individual soldiers and their families. This trend, exemplified by last Sunday's front-page story "`Ripples' of War," which chronicled the effect of a soldier's death on a wide circle of family, friends and acquaintances, represents a more humanistic approach to reporting about the ramifications of war. The same day, The New York Times had a front-page article about deaths of soldiers over age 50 and how their loved ones and friends are coping.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - Finally the Bush and Kerry presidential campaigns have gotten around to talking about Americans' involvement in a foreign war - only it's the wrong war. With the United States increasingly mired in its occupation of Iraq, the campaigns have focused instead recently on the war in Vietnam, which ended nearly three decades ago, and more specifically on how the 2004 presidential candidates served, or didn't serve, in it. President Bush has...
NEWS
By Reed Johnson and Reed Johnson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 6, 2004
When Errol Morris' Oscar-winning documentary The Fog of War opened in theaters in December, Judy Muller intended to snub it. Not that she was blase about the movie's subject, former U.S. Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara. On the contrary, she was "outraged," Muller says, when McNamara issued his mea culpa-ish yet self-justifying memoir about Vietnam in the mid-1990s. As the daughter of a Navy officer and the ex-wife of a former Marine lieutenant stationed in Danang, Muller also had an intimate personal connection to the Vietnam War and its painful domestic repercussions.
NEWS
March 21, 2007
Thousands turned out to protest the war in Iraq on its fourth anniversary, not only in Washington but also in cities scattered across the country. Yet their impact was decidedly low-key. When half a million angry demonstrators filled the Mall on Nov. 15, 1969, to demand an end to the war in Vietnam, the nation could not help but take notice. A whiff of something momentous was in the air. Anti-war Americans today seem no less angry, but their protests don't get much traction. It's a different country now. There's no draft, of course, and this may go a long way toward explaining why the turnouts have not been more momentous.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | February 28, 1991
Maryland members of Congress responded to President Bush's war-winning speech last night with exclamations of joy, incredulity and caution about the road ahead."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
Norman Morrison was a Quaker. He was opposed to war, the violence of war, the killing. He came to the Pentagon, doused himself with gasoline, burned himself to death, below my office. He held a child in his arms, his daughter. Passers-by shouted, `Save the child.' He threw the child. The child lived and is alive today. "His wife issued a very moving statement: `Human beings must stop killing other human beings.' And that's a belief I shared. I shared it then. I believe it even more strongly today.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
It is hard to determine when the word "quagmire" was first used to describe a foreign military adventure gone bad, but its etymology shows that it is an appropriate term. Quagmire's first syllable comes from the word "quake" - as in earthquake - and it originally referred to ground that appeared solid but actually gave way when stepped upon. That could be the description of the British in South Africa in the 1890s or the French in Algeria in the 1960s. In U.S. foreign policy, "quagmire" is usually associated with the war in Vietnam, which appeared to many to be a clear-cut case of stopping Communist aggression and expansion, but turned out to be a far more complex situation.
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