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War In Europe

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By WILLIAM PFAFF | August 9, 1993
Paris.With the end of the Cold War, the world passed from a Copernican to a post-Newtonian political universe.Before, the United States and the Soviet Union provided the fixed political points about which other nations revolved. Since their gravitational force has waned or been withdrawn, the international system's order has been lost, sending individual nations and parties tumbling into unforeseen and unpredictable orbits.So long as the United States and the Soviet Union dominated the international scene, other states, and even the political party systems within other nations, functioned within the fields of force radiating from Moscow and Washington.
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NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | December 18, 1991
Washington. -- Considered in the abstract, the words ''America First'' could hardly offend anyone lucky enough to be a citizen of this country. But after more than two centuries ofpolitical dialogue, most such phrases suggest more than they say.Anyone familiar with our 20th-century history, such as the commentator Pat Buchanan, surely understands this. Thus, in declaring his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination on an ''America First'' platform, he knowingly associates himself with the best-known earlier political movement of that name.
NEWS
By Doug Struck | December 4, 1991
The Chicago Sun is born this day, Dec. 4, 1941, but its competitor, the Tribune, grabs the headlines. The Trib and two other papers print the government's plans for war in Europe, merrily code-named "Victory Parade."The White House must have groaned. Disclosure that the government has a war blueprint is bound to cause President Roosevelt more problems with the isolationists. They have hammered on his administration as trigger-happy, often maneuvering him into an awkward defensive posture.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | November 18, 1991
They were the good ol' days: November 1941.In Middle River, Harry Eugene Mettee was a year out of high school and already working as an inspector at Glenn L. Martin Co., helping to build airplanes for Britain's frantic defense against Nazi Germany.He made good money -- $31 a week. He expected the country to be dragged into the war soon. But, like most 19-year-olds, he was thinking mainly about his job, girls and flashy cars.In downtown Baltimore, Walter Thomas worked as a waiter at the old Emerson Hotel.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 16, 1990
WASHINGTON -- As his chief diplomat describes it, President Bush heads off tonight on a mission to "bury the hatchet" of the Cold War in Europe while laying the political foundation for a hot war looming in the Persian Gulf.His eight days of travel will take him to the public square in Prague, where chanting multitudes peacefully toppled Czechoslovakia's Communist regime one year ago, and then onto elegant treaty-signing ceremonies in Paris that promise a new era of peace and cooperation between East and West.
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