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War In Chechnya

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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 1, 2000
MOSCOW -- Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright began a visit to Moscow yesterday by confronting her hosts over the war in Chechnya, accusing Russia of using excessive force and worsening its problems in the region by indiscriminately targeting civilians. Igor S. Ivanov, the Russian foreign minister, told Albright that Moscow would fight Chechen terrorists as it saw fit, whether its methods were popular or not. "We have made quite clear that we think that there has been an incredible amount of misery injected upon the civilian population of Chechnya," Albright said at a news conference, "both militarily and also because of the creation of so many refugees."
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Foreign Reporter | April 24, 2007
CLARIFICATION The April 24 obituary of Boris Yeltsin carried a Moscow dateline and identified the writer as a Sun foreign reporter. The writer, Will Englund, was a Sun Moscow correspondent who reported on Yeltsin, and who is now on the newspaper's editorial board. MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin, the Russian leader who broke the Soviet Union and the system it had created, died yesterday in Moscow of complications from chronic heart problems. He was 76. Mr.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 6, 1996
KUBINKA, Russia -- Sergei A. Kovalyov, small and frail looking, has come to a sanitarium here, 50 miles west of Moscow, to restore himself so he can take up his singular burden once more. The moral weight of Russia rests on his thin shoulders.Kovalyov, an ardent dissident in Soviet times, has become the most prominent critic of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and the war in Chechnya. An early ally, he has decided that he cannot support the president, even if it means that the Communists win the June 16 election.
NEWS
December 14, 2004
THE AFFLICTION that has disfigured Viktor A. Yushchenko, the Ukrainian presidential candidate, calls to mind a similar malady that befell a crusading member of the Russian parliament, Yuri Shchekochikhin, last year. The one significant difference is that Mr. Yushchenko got to a hospital in Vienna, and lived; Mr. Shchekochikhin went into one in Moscow, and died. Supporters of both men believe they were poisoned by the authorities. Mr. Yushchenko fell ill after having dinner with the head of the Ukrainian KGB; he went through enormous pain, and today his face is bloated and cratered with what Austrian doctors have determined is chloracne, from dioxin ingestion.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 14, 1996
MOSCOW -- Sounding more like a hawkish military commander than the man most Russians thought would finally bring an end to the war in Chechnya, Alexander Lebed, the new national security adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin, took a far more bellicose stance on the war yesterday than he ever has before.Although he said he soon plans to visit the secessionist southern republic to try to negotiate a new peace accord, Lebed's remarks yesterday indicate that the deeply unpopular war, which has killed at least 30,000 people in the last 18 months, might be far from over.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 20, 1995
MOSCOW -- A new poll shows astonishingly broad opposition throughout Russia to the war in Chechnya, offering graphic testimony to the extent to which public opinion here is no longer subject to government efforts at control.The survey found large majorities in favor of a withdrawal of Russian troops from Chechnya, and supportive of European and U.S. criticism of the Russian offensive.By overwhelming numbers, respondents voiced support for critics of the war within the government, and expressed doubt that President Boris N. Yeltsin is in control of the situation.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 10, 1995
MOSCOW -- Volodya, an 18-year-old draftee, has made ppTC decision that helps to illustrate what the war in Chechnya has come to for the once-proud Russian army.He is a deserter.Volodya would not give his last name, for fear of provoking the army even more than he already has. But he is a private who saw it as his duty to serve his country. He spent five months learning to be an air force truck driver and making the pleasant discovery that military life wasn't so bad. Then, on Dec. 27, as Moscow was preparing an ill-fated assault on Chechnya, he was suddenly ordered into the army as an artilleryman.
NEWS
May 29, 1996
PRESIDENT BORIS N. Yeltsin knows a photo opportunity, when he sees one. Visiting Chechnya a day after signing a cease-fire with secessionist rebels, he told his troops: "The war is over and you have won." Of course, the president misspoke on both counts. The war is not over and the Russians have not won.Mr. Yeltsin has a reason to feel good, though. In hosting talks with Chechen rebels in the Kremlin and signing a cease-fire he has created an impression that the bloody 17-month-old war in the Caucasus mountains may finally come to an end. If the cease-fire collapses -- which is a real possibility -- he can claim he did his best and the Chechens -- who are widely despised and distrusted by ethnic Russians anyway -- broke their word.
NEWS
March 24, 1995
Three days after President Clinton disclosed that he is snubbing Britain yet visiting Russia to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the allied victory over Nazi Germany, he got a two-fold response yesterday that bellowed volumes about his tin ear in world affairs. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev declared after "candid" talks with Secretary of State Warren Christopher that the American-Russian "honeymoon is over." In Britain, Prince Charles said, "American English is very corrupting" and pleaded for the primacy of "proper English."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 2000
MOSCOW -- Madeleine K. Albright was sizing up Russia's new president. Who is this 47-year-old man who seemingly came out of nowhere and is now running the Kremlin, the government, the world's second-largest nuclear power? Vladimir V. Putin has been acting president for a month and, after elections March 26, is highly likely to be settling down for a four-year term. The U.S. secretary of state, in Moscow last week for a meeting on the Middle East, had a meeting with Putin that was scheduled for one hour and ran to three.
TOPIC
August 29, 2004
The World Rebel forces loyal to cleric Muqtada al-Sadr left the city of Najaf under a a deal forged by Iraq's most powerful Shiite cleric, the Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Husseini al-Sistani, ending their fight with U.S. troops. The crisis had gripped Iraq since Aug. 5, reduced much of central Najaf to ruins and challenged the authority of the nation's fledgling government. Russian investigators said that the destruction of at least one of two airliners that crashed simultaneously was a terrorist act after finding traces of explosives in its wreckage.
NEWS
October 26, 2002
IN MARCH 1995, a correspondent for The Sun walked along the streets that demarcated the rubble that had once been the center of Grozny, capital of Chechnya. Whatever had not been pulverized was riddled with bullet holes. One old truck near the Presidential Palace had been remade into fine filigree. The Russian soldiers at their posts wore black bandanas over the lower halves of their faces, like cattle rustlers. In front of one checkpoint, they had left a body out on the street, a warning to others.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 18, 2000
MOSCOW - After three grim days in a nasty prison, media magnate Vladimir A. Gusinsky woke up in his own bed yesterday, a new martyr prepared to fight the Kremlin until the end for freedom of the press in Russia. Andrei Babitsky, martyred earlier this year in the same cause, naturally sympathizes. But he fears the end is near, he said yesterday, and the media are on the losing side. "Today, the words of a journalist no longer have any significance," said Babitsky, a Radio Liberty correspondent who was arrested in January while covering the war in Chechnya.
NEWS
June 1, 2000
CHECHNYA'S BRUTAL war is not going well for President Vladimir Putin. His troops are taking heavy casualties. But the bad news does not end there. Russians have been unable to find reliable Chechen allies to galvanize the local population against separatist insurgents. Early this week, Moscow was forced to dump a former mayor of Grozny, a convicted embezzler, as head of the pro-Russian militia. Of his 353 militiamen, 295 had gone AWOL. And yesterday, the capital's deputy mayor and a top Russian administrator were killed by a rebel landmine.
TOPIC
By LEONARD S. RUBENSTEIN AND NATHANIEL RAYMOND | May 14, 2000
DR. HASAN Baiyev opened a small war hospital in the village of Alkhan-Kala, his hometown in Chechnya, at the first clash between Chechen insurgents and the Russian army in 1994. The one-story cement block building contained few medical supplies and a staff of just eight nurses and a handful of volunteers. Baiyev was the sole physician. Refusing to side with either, he treated soldier and civilian, Chechen or Russian. "My plan was to stay despite the bombs and the shelling, to stay until the last minute," he said.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
This article first appeared in the Economist: MOSCOW -- If this is victory, what would a stalemate look like? Even in winter, when the Chechen fighters were at their most vulnerable -- cold, hungry and visible through the bare trees -- the Russian forces, which outnumber them at least tenfold, failed to destroy them. Now spring is making conditions in the mountains friendlier for the Chechens. The war goes on. On April 27, Russia reported 10 dead from a Chechen ambush; another one the day before killed 15. The fighting is in areas which Russia claims to have controlled for weeks.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 19, 1998
MOSCOW -- The voters of the vast Krasnoyarsk region have put a general in power, and that's got Moscow worried. Now Alexander I. Lebed will find out if winning the governorship in Russia's second-largest region can be a springboard to the Kremlin, or just another form of Siberian exile.Lebed is the salty, pugilistic tough guy who stands for common sense and order and has made only the vaguest pronouncements on policy or economics. Even people who are wary of him are attracted to him.He defies the Yeltsin administration and quarrels with Communists, and he will always be remembered as the army general who never wavered in his criticism of the war in Chechnya -- a war he eventually brought to an end during a brief stint as head of President Boris N. Yeltsin's security council.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Political chaos and economic decline in the former Soviet Union since the end of Communist rule have produced "an almost total demographic collapse," as birth rates have plummeted and death rates risen, according to a study released yesterday.The collapse is most dramatic in Russia itself, said Carl Haub, the demographer who wrote the study. Even before the disastrous war in Chechnya, life expectancy for Russian men had fallen below the retirement age of 60, the result of the rising toll of stress-related heart attacks, alcoholism, accidents, murder and suicide, he said.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 2000
MOSCOW -- Madeleine K. Albright was sizing up Russia's new president. Who is this 47-year-old man who seemingly came out of nowhere and is now running the Kremlin, the government, the world's second-largest nuclear power? Vladimir V. Putin has been acting president for a month and, after elections March 26, is highly likely to be settling down for a four-year term. The U.S. secretary of state, in Moscow last week for a meeting on the Middle East, had a meeting with Putin that was scheduled for one hour and ran to three.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 1, 2000
MOSCOW -- Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright began a visit to Moscow yesterday by confronting her hosts over the war in Chechnya, accusing Russia of using excessive force and worsening its problems in the region by indiscriminately targeting civilians. Igor S. Ivanov, the Russian foreign minister, told Albright that Moscow would fight Chechen terrorists as it saw fit, whether its methods were popular or not. "We have made quite clear that we think that there has been an incredible amount of misery injected upon the civilian population of Chechnya," Albright said at a news conference, "both militarily and also because of the creation of so many refugees."
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