Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWar Fever
IN THE NEWS

War Fever

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | January 16, 1992
THE YELLOW ribbons, those few that remain in view, are faded and tattered.The red, white and blue flag-emblazoned T-shirts are stuffed in the back of the closet, forgotten ornaments of another era.Does anyone remember the Persian Gulf War?A year ago today the war began, a war that would be played out live on television. Suddenly everyone was talking about Scuds and sorties and collateral damage. People succumbed to "CNN syndrome," remaining glued to their TVs, unwilling to miss a moment. Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf and Gen. Colin L. Powell became instant heroes, Saddam Hussein instant enemy, and the "mother of all battles" fodder for comedians coast to coast.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Swanson | May 24, 2012
In this bicentennial year of the start of the War of 1812, the StarSpangledBaltimore.com website tells us: "The War of 1812 represents what many see as the definitive end of the American Revolution. A new nation, widely regarded as an upstart, successfully defended itself against the largest, most powerful navy in the world during the maritime assault on Baltimore and Maryland. America's victory over Great Britain confirmed the legitimacy of the Revolution. " But the revolution had ended three decades before 1812, and the choice to launch a new war was made by the U.S. government inWashington, D.C. In the lead-up to the War of 1812, the British and Americans exchanged attacks along the Canadian border and in the open seas.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- After spending more than two years and tens of millions of dollars preparing missions, training commandos and gathering intelligence, the United States has dropped its secret plans to arrest Bosnia's two most wanted men accused of war crimes, senior administration officials say.Plans for clandestine missions to seize the men -- Radovan Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic, the wartime political and military leaders of the Bosnian Serbs -- have been...
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Former Sen. John Edwards was the first national Democrat to congratulate anti-war candidate Ned Lamont on his primary victory over Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, but the phone call wasn't really about Connecticut. Edwards is aggressively pursuing his party's presidential nomination, and his call was a reflection of Lamont's emergence as a liberal hero and nod to the new reality of this election year. Anti-war fever is raging. Democrats, especially those on the left, are angry and aroused, and candidates ignore them at their peril.
NEWS
By Bennard Perlman and Bennard Perlman,Special to The Sun | February 13, 1998
Even before the battleship Maine blew up in Havana harbor 100 years ago Sunday, war fever was being nourished in the United States by sensational newspaper reports accompanied by the pen-and-ink sketches of such artists as George Luks, Frederic Remington, William Glackens and others.In this era, before newspaper photos, the use of drawings captured the public imagination. With the largest U.S. cities boasting as many as two dozen daily papers apiece, news illustrations became circulation boosters.
NEWS
January 5, 2003
NOW IT STARTS to get real. All across America, thousands of families are going to be saying their good-byes in the weeks and months to come. At least 30,000 and maybe as many as 200,000 members of the Reserves and National Guard are being called up in anticipation of a war against Iraq. They'll be leaving their jobs and businesses, their spouses and parents and children, their homes and neighborhoods, to do what's expected of them. These thousands of men and women are answering the call to duty just as millions have in the generations that have come before.
NEWS
By JAMES McCARTNEY | January 22, 1991
Former President Jimmy Carter made a startling and troubling observation a few days before President Bush launched the war on Iraq.Although the United States professes to be a nation of peace, he asserted, it has acquired the reputation in many places around the world ''of being the world's warmonger, with the possible exception of Saddam Hussein.''Are we, indeed, a warlike people?Many church leaders are becoming fearful that this is exactly what is happening. It was Mr. Carter, however, a deeply religious man, who made the case most pointedly.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 20, 2003
BOSTON - This is how I spent the week before the war: Driving across the Florida landscape, locked in the alternate universe of talk radio. I tuned in as an act of professional penance, and I'm sorry now that I didn't take my hands off the wheel to make notes. But I took away lasting memories of propaganda, a souvenir list of fact-free opinions delivered by a cast of angry baritones. Somewhere between Orlando and Tampa, a host spent the morning touting the discovery of an Iraqi drone as the smoking gun in the case against Iraq.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | January 18, 1991
BUSH ADMINISTRATION economists are astonishingly sanguine about the economic costs of a Persian Gulf war. They have convinced themselves and the president that a war, to be won in a few brisk weeks, will be tonic for the economy. After the rousing victory, oil prices will tumble, consumer confidence will return, short-circuiting the recession.The actual costs, of course, will depend on the contours of the actual war. But whatever happens, the costs will not be trivial, nor will they all be immediately obvious.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | October 25, 1993
MUDDY BOOTS AND RED SOCKS. By Malcolm W. Browne. Random House. 366 pages. $23.THERE are two types of journalistic memoirs.One recounts news events the reporter has covered, all-but-forgotten wars and dreams as well as ones better remembered. For instance, the accounts of the '20s and '30s by Leland Stowe, Hallett Abend, Vincent Sheean and others add color and insight that you can't find anywhere else.The other kind of memoir is autobiographical, written by a reporter who thinks his life and thoughts should be of interest to humankind, or at least to that portion of humankind that still reads books.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 20, 2003
BOSTON - This is how I spent the week before the war: Driving across the Florida landscape, locked in the alternate universe of talk radio. I tuned in as an act of professional penance, and I'm sorry now that I didn't take my hands off the wheel to make notes. But I took away lasting memories of propaganda, a souvenir list of fact-free opinions delivered by a cast of angry baritones. Somewhere between Orlando and Tampa, a host spent the morning touting the discovery of an Iraqi drone as the smoking gun in the case against Iraq.
NEWS
January 5, 2003
NOW IT STARTS to get real. All across America, thousands of families are going to be saying their good-byes in the weeks and months to come. At least 30,000 and maybe as many as 200,000 members of the Reserves and National Guard are being called up in anticipation of a war against Iraq. They'll be leaving their jobs and businesses, their spouses and parents and children, their homes and neighborhoods, to do what's expected of them. These thousands of men and women are answering the call to duty just as millions have in the generations that have come before.
NEWS
By Miriam Pemberton | October 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Democratic leadership was open about its motives in rushing through a congressional affirmation of President Bush's war plans in order to get the issue out of the way so the elections can turn on the economy. The problem with this strategy is that it's hard to present yourself to the electorate as an economic champion when you've just voted for a war that is so likely to inflict further damage on an extremely vulnerable economy. The damage is already being done. Oil prices have been flirting dangerously around the $30-a-barrel mark, a price that has been associated with the last four recessions.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 17, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- When Miodrag Vujovic sounds off on NATO's war with Yugoslavia, he slips into his television studio and lets out a roar.During periodic 15-minute screeds on his TV Palma station, the bearded, fiery-eyed 43-year-old has castigated Western leaders, derided NATO and growled, "Only dead Americans are good Americans."For Vujovic and other hard-liners, these are bullish times, for the war fever has emboldened Serbia's superpatriots.With political debate extinguished and even opponents of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic rallying to the country's cause, nationalists and other government supporters are dominating the airwaves and newspapers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- After spending more than two years and tens of millions of dollars preparing missions, training commandos and gathering intelligence, the United States has dropped its secret plans to arrest Bosnia's two most wanted men accused of war crimes, senior administration officials say.Plans for clandestine missions to seize the men -- Radovan Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic, the wartime political and military leaders of the Bosnian Serbs -- have been...
NEWS
By Bennard Perlman and Bennard Perlman,Special to The Sun | February 13, 1998
Even before the battleship Maine blew up in Havana harbor 100 years ago Sunday, war fever was being nourished in the United States by sensational newspaper reports accompanied by the pen-and-ink sketches of such artists as George Luks, Frederic Remington, William Glackens and others.In this era, before newspaper photos, the use of drawings captured the public imagination. With the largest U.S. cities boasting as many as two dozen daily papers apiece, news illustrations became circulation boosters.
NEWS
By David Swanson | May 24, 2012
In this bicentennial year of the start of the War of 1812, the StarSpangledBaltimore.com website tells us: "The War of 1812 represents what many see as the definitive end of the American Revolution. A new nation, widely regarded as an upstart, successfully defended itself against the largest, most powerful navy in the world during the maritime assault on Baltimore and Maryland. America's victory over Great Britain confirmed the legitimacy of the Revolution. " But the revolution had ended three decades before 1812, and the choice to launch a new war was made by the U.S. government inWashington, D.C. In the lead-up to the War of 1812, the British and Americans exchanged attacks along the Canadian border and in the open seas.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 17, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- When Miodrag Vujovic sounds off on NATO's war with Yugoslavia, he slips into his television studio and lets out a roar.During periodic 15-minute screeds on his TV Palma station, the bearded, fiery-eyed 43-year-old has castigated Western leaders, derided NATO and growled, "Only dead Americans are good Americans."For Vujovic and other hard-liners, these are bullish times, for the war fever has emboldened Serbia's superpatriots.With political debate extinguished and even opponents of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic rallying to the country's cause, nationalists and other government supporters are dominating the airwaves and newspapers.
NEWS
April 22, 1994
The Senate Armed Services Committee chairman is ready to extend the war in Bosnia "all the way to Serbia if need be." The Senate's Republican leader is all for having the U.S. "go it alone" by breaking the United Nations arms embargo and shipping weaponry to the Bosnian Muslims. The president wants NATO air power unleashed to protect Muslim cities from Serbian attack, a big escalation from humanitarian aid and protecting U.N. peacekeepers. The secretary of state feels a need "to vindicate U.S. leadership" and protect American "strategic interests" by strong, robust action.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | October 25, 1993
MUDDY BOOTS AND RED SOCKS. By Malcolm W. Browne. Random House. 366 pages. $23.THERE are two types of journalistic memoirs.One recounts news events the reporter has covered, all-but-forgotten wars and dreams as well as ones better remembered. For instance, the accounts of the '20s and '30s by Leland Stowe, Hallett Abend, Vincent Sheean and others add color and insight that you can't find anywhere else.The other kind of memoir is autobiographical, written by a reporter who thinks his life and thoughts should be of interest to humankind, or at least to that portion of humankind that still reads books.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.