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By Cal Thomas | March 12, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - In George Bush's plans to oust Saddam Hussein and liberate the Iraqi people from years of murder and oppression, the president has left out something he might like to consider. The point has been made - and not just by his critics - that the president has not sufficiently rallied the public to his cause. Mr. Bush has yet to call for sacrifice or any type of investment by the people - other than military forces - for his grand undertaking. In December, two Republican senators - Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Conrad Burns of Montana - sponsored legislation to revive war bonds as part of the antiterrorism effort.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Leonard T. Schroeder Jr. was a North Linthicum native and a graduate of Glen Burnie High School, but 70 years ago he carved out a moment in history for himself when, on the morning of the Allied invasion of Normandy, he was credited with being the first American to step ashore in France. In the days following the invasion that marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe, Schroeder was cited in newspaper clippings as likely being the first American soldier to reach Europe in the amphibious invasion.
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NEWS
By B. Phill McGowan and B. Phill McGowan,Sun Staff | November 26, 2000
The ammunition the 1944 Army-Navy game provided to the American effort in fighting World War II came on two fronts: one symbolic, one tangible. Moving this potential national championship game to the showcase location of Baltimore provided a serious morale boost to a nation and military that was persevering through years of rationing. But what was foremost on the minds of Washington politicians was the sale of bonds to help pay off the most expensive war in history -- in excess of $260 billion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2012
Members of the Arch Social Club, at North and Pennsylvania avenues, are about to have a party. And the reason they're partying is that the city's oldest African-American social club is about to celebrate its centenary. An anniversary church service in recognition of its 100th birthday gets under way at 11 a.m. Sunday at Fulton Baptist Church, at 1630 W. North Ave. At its conclusion, revelers can cross the street to the club, and beginning at 1:30 p.m. take in a dinner and a jazz show featuring the Arch Social Club Big Band under the direction of Phil Butts.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | July 23, 1995
50 Years Ago* While a wartime shortage of cigarettes still plagues the rest of the nation, many smokers in Baltimore have discovered that cigarettes are not only plentiful, but that full cartons of standard-brand cigarettes are available entirely free of cost. This modern miracle is but one of the byproduct achievements of American War Bonds en route to their major task of smashing the Japanese war machine. In an effort to step up the sale of war bonds, business houses have used many devices.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | July 3, 1994
50 Years Ago* With a short limit placed on summer cruising by Annapolis midshipmen due to the war, the most extensive summer sport schedule ever will take its place. In the fall, four of the football games will be held in Baltimore. -- The Sun, July 16, 1944.* Some 364 used army trucks were offered today to local farmers by the U.S. procurement office at Fort Meade. Farmers producing enough war foods to qualify for one of the trucks must apply through the Agricultural Adjustment Agency. -- The Sun, July 27, 1944.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | January 23, 1994
25 Years Ago* An ordinance that would establish historical districts in Westminster and forbid the alteration or demolition of any building within that district unless approved by a Historical Commission is being submitted to the mayor and City Council. Proposed by the Historical Society of Carroll County, the ordinance aims at preserving districts and specific buildings of Westminster which reflect its cultural, social and architectural history. -- Democratic Advocate, Feb. 3, 1969.50 Years Ago* See a captured German Messerschmitt fighter plane from actual combat war zones at St. John's Catholic Church Grounds, East Main Street, on Feb. 1, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The plane was captured at Naples Slareno.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia porter and Sylvia porter,1991 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | April 22, 1991
For times like these, why doesn't someone invent a risk-free investment for small investors who can't afford to speculate?Someone already did -- half a century ago. Today it's the most widely held investment instrument in the world, and still going, stronger than ever. You know it as the U.S. Savings Bond.Last month Americans purchased $815 million worth of U.S. Savings Bonds, setting a 50-year record for the month. You also made the first quarter of 1991 a record, putting away $2.57 billion in the quarter and prompting Catalina V. Villalpando, treasurer of the United States, to see it as a tribute to "the returning savings ethic of Americans."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Ruth L. Thomas, whose philanthropic interests ranged from medical and educational institutions to helping newly arrived immigrants, died Wednesday of complications from a stroke at Springhouse Assisted-Living in Pikesville. Mrs. Thomas would have celebrated her 98th birthday this coming week. The daughter of Jacob Legum, founder of Park Circle Motor Co., and Rose l. Legum, a homemaker, Ruth Legum was born in Norfolk, Va., and moved with her family to Fairview Avenue in Forest Park in 1917.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Leonard T. Schroeder Jr. was a North Linthicum native and a graduate of Glen Burnie High School, but 70 years ago he carved out a moment in history for himself when, on the morning of the Allied invasion of Normandy, he was credited with being the first American to step ashore in France. In the days following the invasion that marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe, Schroeder was cited in newspaper clippings as likely being the first American soldier to reach Europe in the amphibious invasion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Ruth L. Thomas, whose philanthropic interests ranged from medical and educational institutions to helping newly arrived immigrants, died Wednesday of complications from a stroke at Springhouse Assisted-Living in Pikesville. Mrs. Thomas would have celebrated her 98th birthday this coming week. The daughter of Jacob Legum, founder of Park Circle Motor Co., and Rose l. Legum, a homemaker, Ruth Legum was born in Norfolk, Va., and moved with her family to Fairview Avenue in Forest Park in 1917.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 12, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - In George Bush's plans to oust Saddam Hussein and liberate the Iraqi people from years of murder and oppression, the president has left out something he might like to consider. The point has been made - and not just by his critics - that the president has not sufficiently rallied the public to his cause. Mr. Bush has yet to call for sacrifice or any type of investment by the people - other than military forces - for his grand undertaking. In December, two Republican senators - Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Conrad Burns of Montana - sponsored legislation to revive war bonds as part of the antiterrorism effort.
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2001
The Department of Defense has appealed for ideas to help in the fight against terrorism. Officials said they want innovative ideas from sources that might otherwise not have access to the Pentagon - small companies and individuals with imaginative solutions. This idea of the national equivalent to the office suggestion box drew jibes from some quarters. A Washington columnist for the New York Times laughed at the idea of "every Tom, Dick and Goofball" becoming national security consultants.
NEWS
By B. Phill McGowan and B. Phill McGowan,Sun Staff | November 26, 2000
The ammunition the 1944 Army-Navy game provided to the American effort in fighting World War II came on two fronts: one symbolic, one tangible. Moving this potential national championship game to the showcase location of Baltimore provided a serious morale boost to a nation and military that was persevering through years of rationing. But what was foremost on the minds of Washington politicians was the sale of bonds to help pay off the most expensive war in history -- in excess of $260 billion.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
When the Army and Navy service academies last met for a football game in Baltimore, FDR was in the White House and the Nazis were beating a bloody retreat across Europe. More than 5 million Americans were in uniform overseas. Some questioned the propriety of moving the 1944 game from its subdued venues on the campuses of the respective academies, where it had been held during the war. After all, the Allies had landed at Normandy just six months earlier and were engaged in fierce fighting.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | July 23, 1995
50 Years Ago* While a wartime shortage of cigarettes still plagues the rest of the nation, many smokers in Baltimore have discovered that cigarettes are not only plentiful, but that full cartons of standard-brand cigarettes are available entirely free of cost. This modern miracle is but one of the byproduct achievements of American War Bonds en route to their major task of smashing the Japanese war machine. In an effort to step up the sale of war bonds, business houses have used many devices.
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2001
The Department of Defense has appealed for ideas to help in the fight against terrorism. Officials said they want innovative ideas from sources that might otherwise not have access to the Pentagon - small companies and individuals with imaginative solutions. This idea of the national equivalent to the office suggestion box drew jibes from some quarters. A Washington columnist for the New York Times laughed at the idea of "every Tom, Dick and Goofball" becoming national security consultants.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 29, 1994
The Baltimore News-Post that day gave hints of the beginning of the end: "Allies Crush Fierce Nazi Counter-Attacks," the front page headline said. Nowhere did it use the phrase "D-Day," but maybe it didn't have to. The beginning of the end, indeed: June 7, 1944, the day the newspapers reported the Allied invasion to end the war in Europe."
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | July 3, 1994
50 Years Ago* With a short limit placed on summer cruising by Annapolis midshipmen due to the war, the most extensive summer sport schedule ever will take its place. In the fall, four of the football games will be held in Baltimore. -- The Sun, July 16, 1944.* Some 364 used army trucks were offered today to local farmers by the U.S. procurement office at Fort Meade. Farmers producing enough war foods to qualify for one of the trucks must apply through the Agricultural Adjustment Agency. -- The Sun, July 27, 1944.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 29, 1994
The Baltimore News-Post that day gave hints of the beginning of the end: "Allies Crush Fierce Nazi Counter-Attacks," the front page headline said. Nowhere did it use the phrase "D-Day," but maybe it didn't have to. The beginning of the end, indeed: June 7, 1944, the day the newspapers reported the Allied invasion to end the war in Europe."
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