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War And Peace

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By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace by Masha Gessen. The Dial Press. 371 pages. $24. She was Harrison Salisbury's personal reader. It was the early 1950s, and the outstanding and distinguished New York Times reporter was the only American newspaper correspondent living in Moscow. Ruzya Solodovnik worked at the Central Telegraph building on what was then Gorky Street, and she was his censor. She, alone among Soviet citizens, knew what he was writing about her country.
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Baltimore Sun staff | September 6, 2012
Below are President Barack Obama's full remarks as prepared for delivery at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., on Thursday night. Michelle, I love you. The other night, I think the entire country saw just how lucky I am. Malia and Sasha, you make me so proud…but don't get any ideas, you're still going to class tomorrow.  And Joe Biden, thank you for being the best Vice President I could ever hope for.  Madam Chairwoman, delegates, I accept your nomination for President of the United States.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2002
Many an intimidating copy of Tolstoy's War and Peace sits unread on a shelf, though people always mean to read it sometime, all 1,500 pages of it. At least everyone knows the novel is a masterpiece. Prokofiev's War and Peace goes largely unheard and unseen. Although some folks occasionally express an interest in the opera, all four hours of it, the word "masterpiece" doesn't always work its way into the conversation. The Metropolitan Opera's new production, in conjunction with the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, successfully challenges the conventional wisdom that Prokofiev wasn't the right man to distill Tolstoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | February 19, 2009
Although the economy looms largest in the public consciousness now, issues of war and peace have hardly gone away - they never do, somehow. Those issues will be the focus of a presentation this weekend, part of the Tiffany Series at Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church. "Imagine a World Without War" features music of diverse genres, as well as remarks by longtime peace activist Elizabeth McAlister, who, with her husband, the late Philip F. Berrigan, played a major role in the movement against the Vietnam War. The musical portion includes Portrait of Peace, a five-movement work for horn, piano and percussion composed by Brian Prechtl, a percussionist in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | February 18, 1991
FOR MANY families, early evening is the worst of times. Even without a war.Children and adults, both in their own worlds for the last eight or 10 hours, are coming back together, bringing with them the joys and frustrations of their day, expecting support and comfort, as well as food.Parents are tired, kids are tired. And still there are dinner and homework and phone calls and chores and, in most homes, tension.War can make it worse.Even in families not directly affected by the Persian Gulf war, anxiety levels may be higher than usual, experts say. Children may be troubled by what they've talked about in school; adults may be upset by the news they've heard -- or not heard -- during the day.Add to this mix the nightly news with film of bodies being carried from a bombed-out structure or the on-again, off-again promise of peace.
NEWS
By Bethany Broida and Bethany Broida,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2003
As images and news about the war in Iraq have loomed in recent weeks, Howard County religious leaders have been focusing on messages of peace. Members of many area churches and synagogues have been straddling the fine line between support for U.S. troops overseas and discussing whether the war is just. Whether their members have supported the war or opposed military action, many congregations simply prayed for a peaceful and just resolution. "Our congregation is very divided about this particular war," said Rabbi Sonya Starr of Columbia Jewish Congregation.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | July 14, 1991
Minutes after Joseph P. Walsh Jr. arrived in Dharan, Saudi Arabia, he was phoning his wife at his home here.He had arrived safely, but his luggage was lost.Could she make a quick shopping trip?Deborah Walsh raced out of their Miller Drive home on a crash shopping spree. With freshly packed suitcases in tow, she --ed to Washington, D.C., and gave her husband's new clothes to another Persian Gulf-bound colleague.The lost luggage never materialized, but changes of clothing were the leastof Walsh's problems as he plunged into a round-the-clock job: covering the war and later the peace as a correspondent for Mutual NBC Radio.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 11, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Edging America closer to possible war, Congress voted decisively to give President Bush the broad authority he wants to use military force against Iraq. The Senate passed the measure early this morning by a vote of 77-23, after the House approved it yesterday, 296-133. Passage followed solemn debate in both chambers -- spending three days in the House and about a week in the Senate -- about the consequences of authorizing a pre-emptive attack on Iraq. The resolution allows Bush to use force, acting alone if necessary, to protect the United States from threats posed by Iraq and to enforce United Nations mandates that Saddam Hussein has defied.
NEWS
December 17, 1994
Arthur Bestor, 86, a constitutional historian and a frequent commentator on the separation of powers, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his home in Seattle. He was a professor emeritus of history at the University of Washington, where he taught from 1962 until his retirement in 1976. His historical studies of the constitutional provisions for making war and peace, of the roles of the presidency in defining foreign relations and the impeachment process were widely read in the 1970s and 1980s.
NEWS
October 23, 1994
Sergei Bondarchuk, 74, one of Russia's greatest film directors and a prominent actor, died Thursday of a blood disease in Moscow. He became well-known when he directed and starred in the Mosfilm-produced "The Fate of a Man" in 1959. He won broader fame for his 1965-1967 adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's "War and Peace," in which he played Pierre Bezukhov. The 16-hour movie was re-edited and sold internationally.
SPORTS
April 3, 2008
Rays@Orioles 7 P.M. [MASN] Final game of the opening series of the season with veteran Steve Trachsel scheduled to pitch for the O's in his second go-around here. The good thing about watching a game pitched by Trachsel (known as the Human Rain Delay) is that you have plenty of time between pitches to grab a snack. Or do your laundry. Or catch up on your reading -- even if what you're reading is War and Peace.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,sun reporter | July 18, 2007
Reading War and Peace, the classic 19th-century novel by Leo Tolstoy about life in Russian society during the Napoleonic era, has been described by some as an arduous undertaking. Turning the nearly 1,500-page epic into an hourlong water ballet, though? No problemski. If you go War and Fleas will premiere at a hot dog and beer benefit at Riverside Park's pool at 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $20. All other performances are $8. They will be at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday at Riverside and at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. July 28 and 29 at Patterson Park's pool.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN REPORTER | September 27, 2006
WASHINGTON --The Rev. Andrew Foster Connors remained calm yesterday as a police officer put his hands in white plastic handcuffs and searched his pockets after he crossed a police line outside the U.S. Capitol. Less than an hour later, the Rev. Roger Scott Powers was also led away in handcuffs from the interfaith demonstration against the war in Iraq in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building. The two Presbyterian ministers from Baltimore were among 71 people who were detained yesterday as they protested the war in Iraq - and continued Baltimore's long tradition of civil disobedience against wars.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Everyone hates rudeness. Even small, feral children are stunned when people are rude back to them. Yet despite this universal disdain for incivility, almost no one wants to hear (much less read) that the manners apply as much to them as to that rude person over there. Manners, it would appear, are for other people. Call it the Civility Disconnect: In the 21st century, the lack of manners has rendered us acculturated to incivility. However, in an era of globalization, shifting political landscapes and terrorism, incivility can be more than just annoying; it can be downright dangerous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace by Masha Gessen. The Dial Press. 371 pages. $24. She was Harrison Salisbury's personal reader. It was the early 1950s, and the outstanding and distinguished New York Times reporter was the only American newspaper correspondent living in Moscow. Ruzya Solodovnik worked at the Central Telegraph building on what was then Gorky Street, and she was his censor. She, alone among Soviet citizens, knew what he was writing about her country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Makely and John Makely,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
In some ways, life in Afghanistan today appears peaceful. Children ride their bikes through the parks. Vendors are busy in the bazaars. Some neighborhoods have started rebuilding after years of occupation, civil war and air strikes. But in any town, there are landmarks to remind passers-by that peace is easily shattered: the street where they car-bombed the German troops, the shop where they put a bomb in a shopping bag. The faceless threat of al-Qaida and the Taliban generates an undercurrent of unease.
SPORTS
April 3, 2008
Rays@Orioles 7 P.M. [MASN] Final game of the opening series of the season with veteran Steve Trachsel scheduled to pitch for the O's in his second go-around here. The good thing about watching a game pitched by Trachsel (known as the Human Rain Delay) is that you have plenty of time between pitches to grab a snack. Or do your laundry. Or catch up on your reading -- even if what you're reading is War and Peace.
FEATURES
By The Literary Almanac | July 26, 1998
Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)was born in Yasnaya Polyana, Russia, into an aristocratic family. Orphaned at 9, he was brought up by an elderly aunt and studied at Kazan University, but did not graduate. After several aimless years in town and countryside, Tolstoy served as an officer in the Caucasus, wrote his first novels, and after the Crimean War retired as commander. He returned to St. Petersburg a literary star, traveled abroad and married Sophie Behrs in 1862. They had 13 children. He is best remembered for some of the most important fiction ever written - "War and Peace" (1869)
NEWS
By Bethany Broida and Bethany Broida,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2003
As images and news about the war in Iraq have loomed in recent weeks, Howard County religious leaders have been focusing on messages of peace. Members of many area churches and synagogues have been straddling the fine line between support for U.S. troops overseas and discussing whether the war is just. Whether their members have supported the war or opposed military action, many congregations simply prayed for a peaceful and just resolution. "Our congregation is very divided about this particular war," said Rabbi Sonya Starr of Columbia Jewish Congregation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria Brownworth and By Victoria Brownworth,Special to the Sun | April 13, 2003
Writing by those who do the actual fighting tells a tale of war unlike any told by observers, however deeply embedded. Whether writ by history's battlefield stalwarts, or by youthful geniuses like Wilfred Owen and Rupert Brooke, who died along with a generation of English soldiers in World War I, these personal battlefield accounts reveal a side of war few noncombatants know. Memoirs, novels and poetry by those who have seen action and lived to tell the tale give a far more revelatory picture of war than any CNN telecast.
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