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War Against Iraq

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By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 23, 2002
LONDON - If there is a clear gauge for measuring the lack of support for American military action to topple Saddam Hussein of Iraq, it can be found among the best European friends the United States has, in Britain. And here, as in the United States, influential leaders have not only withheld support for war but are campaigning against it. Prime Minister Tony Blair, who was among the first European leaders to back the bombing of Afghanistan and was key to forming the coalition that supported the action, has expressed second thoughts about a war against Iraq, a campaign that he previously signaled he would be willing to join.
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FEATURES
March 19, 2008
March 19 2003 President Bush ordered the start of war against Iraq. (Because of the time difference, it was early March 20 in Iraq.)
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 11, 2003
SEDGEFIELD, England - The obvious target of the next United Nations Security Council vote on Iraq is Saddam Hussein, but the decision-making - the if and when of whether to wage war to disarm him - looks increasingly like it could cause an unintended casualty: the political career of British Prime Minister Tony Blair. That is reflected in defections within Blair's own party - even his Cabinet - and in opinion polls in Britain, which show that public support for a war against Iraq hinges on a second resolution from the Security Council.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | February 4, 2008
ATLANTA -- In October 1962, a young president confronted one of the greatest crises of his century. After U.S. intelligence confirmed that the Soviets were shipping medium-range nuclear missiles to Cuba - missiles easily capable of reaching the United States, just 90 miles away - President John F. Kennedy considered whether to set fire to the Cold War. The press was itching for a first strike by American forces, as was the public. The formidable Dean Acheson, an architect of the U.S. strategy of communist containment, pushed for an invasion of Cuba.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2002
Among Marylanders, the difference in opinion last night on President Bush's speech - in which he urged confronting the Iraqi regime "for the sake of peace" - was as wide as the distance between Washington and Baghdad. Many remained unconvinced that military action is the answer, while others pledged their full support to the president. From Salisbury to Charles Village, about the only thing residents did agree on was that the president's half-hour address, beamed into their homes from Cincinnati, did little to change opinions they held prior to his remarks.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 5, 2003
LONDON -- Prime Minister Tony Blair failed yesterday to persuade French President Jacques Chirac to support a United Nations resolution authorizing war with Iraq. Chirac made clear, however, that he might change his mind if he is convinced that Iraq is stockpiling or producing weapons of mass destruction. The two leaders, whose relationship has been frosty at best, sought to stress their agreement on the need to disarm Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. But Chirac, appearing at a news conference with Blair in the French resort of Le Touquet on the English Channel, declined to promise support for a resolution authorizing war and refused to rule out vetoing such a measure.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - The foreign minister of Qatar said yesterday that his nation opposes war against Iraq, but he did not rule out the possibility that Qatar, on the Persian Gulf, would allow the United States to use its military bases to launch such an attack. The minister, Sheik Hamad bin Jasim bin Jabir al-Thani, said he thought war against Iraq would "destabilize the region," adding that his government has urged President Saddam Hussein to allow U.N. weapons inspectors back into Iraq without restrictions or conditions.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 2004
WUERZBURG, Germany - Deputy Defense Secretary Paul D. Wolfowitz said yesterday that the Bush administration was justified in toppling Saddam Hussein, regardless of whether prewar American intelligence indicating that Iraq had stockpiled unconventional weapons was proved wrong. "You have to make decisions based on the intelligence you have, not on the intelligence you can discover later," Wolfowitz said during a visit here with troops of the 1st Infantry Division, which is scheduled to go to Iraq in coming weeks.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 25, 2003
KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait - It's after midnight, but the dozen men of the Sabah al-Salem neighborhood gathered in a second-floor banquet room have no plans to go home yet. They order more cups of tea and coffee. They light cigarettes. They prop themselves up on plush crimson pillows. They want to talk more about a possible U.S.-led war against their neighbor, Iraq. A young schoolteacher opposed to war asks how an Iraqi family would feel if U.S. soldiers accidentally killed an innocent son or daughter during an attack.
FEATURES
March 19, 2008
March 19 2003 President Bush ordered the start of war against Iraq. (Because of the time difference, it was early March 20 in Iraq.)
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | May 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - The supporters of John R. Bolton as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations believe that the charge that he politicized intelligence on a series of international issues is no more than a smokescreen to block his confirmation. In fact, his political handling of intelligence materials on Cuba, Iraq and North Korea should disqualify him from any high-level position in the Bush administration. There is no question that Mr. Bolton and others misused intelligence on weapons of mass destruction to make the case for going to war against Iraq and to block political dialogue with Cuba and North Korea.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - In the wake of President Bush's surprisingly lame performance in last week's first presidential debate, his campaign reacted by latching on to two of Sen. John Kerry's words: his suggestion of a "global test" for pre-emptive military action. Speaking the day after the debate to one of his usual pre-screened crowds of adoring supporters, Mr. Bush lashed out at the mere suggestion of such a test. "Senator Kerry last night said that America has to pass some sort of global test before we can use American troops to defend ourselves," Mr. Bush said, pausing and grinning as the audience booed Mr. Kerry's name.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 15, 2004
WASHINGTON -- What do President Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney and Sens. John Kerry and John Edwards have in common besides their fat wallets? Not one of them will admit that he was flimflammed about the Iraq war. At least Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, was courageous enough in the wake of his committee's blistering assessment of prewar intelligence to say something truly outrageous in Washington society:...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 17, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The word around town is that White House aides have been encouraged to plug Plan of Attack, the best-selling book by Bob Woodward that chronicles how President Bush took the country to war against Iraq. The question is why. What's remarkable about the White House's touting of the book is that, at least to one reader, it doesn't make the president and those around him look all that good in light of how we got into the war and how it has unfolded ever since. Mr. Woodward draws heavily on observations by the president from more than three hours of interviews, as well as long conversations with such principal players in the drama as Vice President Dick Cheney, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and others.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 29, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israeli officials overestimated the military threat posed by Iraq because of faulty intelligence that was derived from conjecture rather than based on fact, an investigation by Israel's parliament concluded in a report released yesterday. A special parliamentary committee, basing its findings on eight months of closed hearings, recommended restructuring Israel's intelligence services, including the Mossad, but said there had been no deliberate attempt to falsify information about Iraq before the U.S. invasion of the country last March.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - It takes a certain amount of ego to do this job. I don't mean an unhealthy obsession with the wonderfulness of oneself. Rather, I mean that inflicting one's opinions on others for a living requires immense confidence in one's own judgment. This is not a job for people who don't like saying, "I told you so." Your humble correspondent was typical in this regard until a year ago today. That's when the war against Iraq began. As bombs began raining on Baghdad, I worried - and argued in this space - that we were making a dreadful mistake.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | March 10, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The solid reasons for going to war with Iraq -- and rebuilding that nation as a democracy -- are cogently and succinctly sketched in Lawrence Kaplan and William Kristol's slim volume The War Against Iraq. The case does not rest upon humanitarian concerns alone, but if it did, it would still be powerful. The tyranny that Saddam Hussein has imposed on Iraq has few equals in the world today. International human rights groups, as well as the United Nations, report that some 16,000 Iraqis have disappeared, never to be accounted for. Mr. Hussein's agents are everywhere searching out evidence of disloyalty.
NEWS
August 28, 2002
`IF WE go to war against Iraq, it will be an unmitigated disaster. ... There's nothing good that can come out of this." -- Scott Ritter, former U.N. weapons inspector in Iraq, in a meeting Thursday with members of The Sun's editorial board
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - Just as former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean seems headed for the sidelines as a Democratic presidential candidate, his main theme - President Bush's pre-emptive war against Iraq - is re-emerging as a central campaign issue. Dr. Dean has already returned his campaign rhetoric to the issue that helped make him the front-runner before his misfortune in the Iowa caucuses and subsequent primary defeats. But the renewed focus on the war isn't likely to resuscitate his candidacy as much as give more anti-Bush ammunition to the whole Democratic field.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 2004
MUNICH, Germany - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld offered yesterday an impassioned defense of the American-led war against Iraq to some of Europe's fiercest critics of the conflict. Rumsfeld placed the blame for the war squarely on Saddam Hussein for his "deception and defiance," and refusal to abandon his illegal weapons program, as Libya did recently. "It was his choice," Rumsfeld said in a speech here to an audience of 250 government ministers, lawmakers and national security experts from 30 countries, most of them in Europe.
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