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Walters Art Gallery

NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 14, 1991
An appraisal of the Lucas collection of art -- which th Maryland Institute College of Art, is considering whether to sell -- has been completed by art dealer and appraiser William J. Tomlinson, who said a previous estimate of its worth as $15 million to $20 million is "much too high."The institute has been considering the sale of the 20,000-piece collection, either whole or in part, for at least two years. Virtually all of the works have been on loan to the Baltimore Museum of Art for almost 60 years, with a few pieces at the Walters Art Gallery.
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FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | May 5, 1991
Sun art critic John Dorsey says he always thought of the Walters Art Gallery's collection of Asian art as "one of the great unknown collections" because only a few pieces could ever be shown; most of it has been hidden away for nearly a century. Of the 3,000 porcelains in the collection, for instance, only 45 could be on display at any one time.All that changes today with the opening of Hackerman House, the Walters' Museum of Asian Art. Like the collection, the house itself has been a hidden treasure.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | February 5, 1995
From The Sun Feb. 5-11, 1845Feb. 7: The poor horses have a hard time of it now. The sleighs are continually going to the manifest injury of horse-flesh. We observe that many of the animals are so smooth shod, as scarcely to be able to get along -- we saw several fall, some under heavy loads in carts and drays. This should not be.Feb. 10: Lyford's Commercial Journal says that the Baltimore Life Insurance Company took risks on 13 persons during the month of January.From The Sun Feb. 5-11, 1895Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 4, 1999
Life imitated art at the Hackerman House, with help from the Women's Committee of the Walters Art Gallery. The committee and area garden clubs designed floral interpretations of 25 Asian artworks in the museum's Hackerman House for the 10th annual Art Blooms event. At the opening-night party, 300 art and flower fans admired the results. Peter Van Dyke, retired T. Rowe Price managing director, picked as his fave a bunch of blooms that copied a camel. Leeward Resources president Billy Brown and wife, Mary Ellen, thought a botanical buddha the best.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | July 30, 1997
Hackerman House, the Walters Art Gallery's museum of Asian Art, has been closed temporarily to help meet demands of city budget cuts, Walters director Gary Vikan confirmed last night.The house, a separate building attached to the gallery and originally built as a 19th-century townhouse, will be closed beginning today for up to eight weeks. It will reopen no later than Sept. 21 and perhaps sooner if a Walters fund appeal succeeds."I anticipate this is eight weeks, max," said Vikan. "I hope it will be open in a couple of weeks depending on what happens.
FEATURES
By YOLANDA GARFIELD | March 29, 1992
The Women's Committee of the Walters Art Gallery presents its third annual "Art Blooms at the Walters" this Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. The event celebrates the beauty of works of art and flowers. Exhibits of fresh flower arrangements created by garden clubs will interpret selected works of art throughout the museum.An opening-night reception, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., will feature a preview of the floral arrangements, an auction and an appearance by the event's guest speakers. The $50-per-person admission fee also includes champagne and cocktails.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | August 1, 1993
An item in the "This Week" feature in Sunday's Arts and Entertainment section gave the wrong address for Artshowcase gallery. The correct address is 336 N. Charles St.The Sun regrets the errors.Admission to Mongrel Theatre's production of "The Firebugs" at the Merrick Barn at the Johns Hopkins University was incorrect in Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section. Admission is $7 for the general public and $5 for students and seniors.The Sun regrets the error.Portrait of Hillary: The seat of power?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 1, 1992
At the beginning of "Manuscript Illumination in Flanders" at the Walters Art Gallery is a painting of a crucifixion in a psalter of about 1300. Christ is shown on the cross between the Virgin Mary and John the Evangelist, on a flat gold background with both the sun and the moon above. The event is rendered in an almost abstract, symbolic way, with no attempt to create a setting from the real world for it.Toward the end of the same show is a depiction of the flight into Egypt from a book of hours of about 1510-1520, probably from Bruges.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1999
Mount Vernon's institutional leaders have outlined a legislative agenda aimed at restoring the Baltimore neighborhood's vitality, with plans for new lighting, sidewalks, informational kiosks and other tourist-friendly improvements to area streets. "We'll be at Annapolis next year with an articulated plan for the neighborhood and a bill for new lamping," said Gary Vikan, director of Walters Art Gallery. "New streetscapes are right at the top." Late last week, Vikan and his counterparts endorsed consultants' concepts -- aimed at making area streets more attractive and complementary to churches, schools, retail shops, arts institutions and residences.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 25, 1992
Is water waterier in Venice? Or does it just inspire artists to do something special with it?The water in John Singer Sargent's "Venetian Canal, Palazzo Corner, Contarini" (about 1880) and on Maurice Prendergast's rain-soaked street in front of "The Porch With the Old Mosaics, St. Marks, Venice" (1899) doesn't necessarily look more like water than the water in, say, George Howell Gay's "Surf at Northampton, Long Island" (about 1890) or Frederick Schiller Cozzens' "Breakwater at Low Tide" (1895)
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