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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
A contingent of Orioles players and staff, including Showalter, visited wounded veterans Tuesday at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda before the team's game against the Washington Nationals. Major League Baseball encourages the visitation when teams play in Washington, and the Orioles try to make it an annual trip. “I challenge everybody to go some time. Some people are given a completely different perspective, some people it … makes you kind of understand the price you pay for everything,” Showalter said.
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NEWS
August 26, 2013
Maryland has made a major step forward in encouraging hospitals to go 'baby-friendly' in support of breast-feeding ("Hospitals agree to state's breast-feeding standards," Aug. 5; "Progress on breast-feeding," Commentary, Aug. 21). In her report, Andrea Walker and The Sun neglected to include Walter Reed National Military Medical Center as one of Maryland's birthing hospitals and to note its commitment to breast-feeding that predates the state's campaign. Over 1,000 Maryland citizens are born at the "President's Hospital" in Bethesda each year on a labor and delivery service that opened in 1949.
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NEWS
July 30, 1991
Walter Reed, 72, a retired track inspector for the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, died Friday at his home on Clifton Avenue of cancer.Funeral services were being held today at the Simmons Memorial Baptist Church, Pennsylvania Avenue and Cumberland Street.Mr. Reed retired in 1978 after working for the railroad in Baltimore for 33 years. Earlier, he worked for Archer Laundry.During World War II, he served in the Army and was decorated for his service in Italy.A native of Caroline, Va., he came to Baltimore as a child with his family.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
A contingent of Orioles players and staff, including Showalter, visited wounded veterans Tuesday at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda before the team's game against the Washington Nationals. Major League Baseball encourages the visitation when teams play in Washington, and the Orioles try to make it an annual trip. “I challenge everybody to go some time. Some people are given a completely different perspective, some people it … makes you kind of understand the price you pay for everything,” Showalter said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
While many teenagers were eagerly anticipating what gifts they will receive this holiday season, students at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City were making sure that soldiers at Walter Reed Army Medical Center don't go empty-handed. Mount Hebron High staged its fourth annual Operation Remembering Our Troops for soldiers recuperating at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Bethesda. During the drive, which was launched by office secretary Maura Dribben, the school collected such items as gift cards of $5 or $10 that soldiers can use at department stores and grocery stores, as well as phone cards.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes | May 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said yesterday that he has asked the department's top military and civilian leaders to begin meeting weekly to carry out recommendations of review groups that have examined failures at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Gates said his deputy, Gordon England, will lead a strategy and oversight group consisting of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and health officials to see that reforms proposed by the Pentagon's Independent Review Group, a commission appointed by President Bush and other task forces are put into effect.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | July 4, 2008
BETHESDA - President Bush turned a spade of dirt to ceremonially launch a major expansion of one of the nation's premier military hospitals yesterday, saying he hoped a new Walter Reed National Military Medical Center "will be the site of many miracles of healing." Flanked by officers, soldiers and civilian military leaders, Bush joined Rep. Chris Van Hollen of Montgomery County and Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown in dipping a gold-painted shovel into a container of soil in the shadow of the art deco tower that is the centerpiece of the National Naval Medical Center.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | March 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Army Secretary Francis J. Harvey resigned under pressure from Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates yesterday, becoming the second top Army official forced to step down because of revelations of problems in the care of seriously injured soldiers at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. In an unusually harsh denunciation, Gates said he was displeased with some Army officials over their handling of disclosures that soldiers had received substandard housing and poor outpatient treatment at Walter Reed.
NEWS
By Joel Havemann and Joel Havemann,Los Angeles Times | March 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush inspected the much-maligned Walter Reed Army Medical Center yesterday and reiterated his promise to fix the bureaucratic bungling that led to shoddy living conditions and treatment delays for wounded soldiers - problems that sparked a shake-up of top-ranking military officials. In his first visit to what had been regarded as the nation's premier military hospital since the disclosure of squalid conditions there earlier this year, Bush apologized for "bureaucratic and administrative failures."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 2, 2007
WASHINGTON --The two-star general in charge of Walter Reed Army Medical Center was relieved of command yesterday, after disclosures that wounded soldiers being treated as outpatients were living in dilapidated quarters and enduring long waits for care. Maj. Gen. George W. Weightman, a physician and a graduate of West Point, was fired because Army Secretary Francis J. Harvey "had lost trust and confidence" in his ability to make improvements in outpatient care at Walter Reed, the Army said in a brief statement.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Tracy Balazs, the president and CEO of an Annapolis-based staffing firm, was named Entrepreneurial Success of the Year last month by the Baltimore district office of the U.S. Small Business Administration. She founded the company, Federal Staffing Resources LLC, in 2004. It now employs more than 300 people, has eight offices across the country and generates more than $30 million in revenue annually. The company mainly provides health professionals to government outfits, including the Army, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Federal Aviation Administration, though FSR recently expanded its operations to the staffing of private companies.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
A motorcade of police vehicles escorting wounded military service members from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to New York City will cause roving lane closures on multiple area highways Wednesday morning, according to Baltimore Police. The motorcade will begin at Walter Reed in Bethesda at 7 a.m. and is expected to impact morning commutes in the Washington and Baltimore metropolitan area, police said. The motorcade will travel northbound along Interstate 495 and Interstate 95. krector@baltsun.com twitter.com/rectorsun
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
Ever since Harford County learned that the nationwide military base realignment would bring up to 10,000 new jobs to Aberdeen Proving Ground, officials and residents have pushed for road improvements around the Army base. Average daily traffic on Route 715 to and from the installation grew from 7,950 vehicles in 2004, the year before the Base Realignment and Closure process was announced, to 12,612 in 2011, according to the State Highway Administration. Traffic on U.S. 40 near the post increased by nearly 3,000 vehicles per day. "As we prepared for BRAC, our No. 1 roads priority was upgrades to intersections closest to the installation," said Karen Holt, who manages a consortium of government agencies and business groups formed to promote economic development in the region.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
While many teenagers were eagerly anticipating what gifts they will receive this holiday season, students at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City were making sure that soldiers at Walter Reed Army Medical Center don't go empty-handed. Mount Hebron High staged its fourth annual Operation Remembering Our Troops for soldiers recuperating at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Bethesda. During the drive, which was launched by office secretary Maura Dribben, the school collected such items as gift cards of $5 or $10 that soldiers can use at department stores and grocery stores, as well as phone cards.
NEWS
November 10, 2009
Perhaps no one could have anticipated that the stresses of his job as an Army psychiatrist counseling traumatized veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, coupled with his own conflicted feelings about Islamic terrorism and dread of being deployed to a war zone, would result in Maj. Nidal Hasan standing accused of killing 13 and wounding 38 of his fellow soldiers at Fort Hood Army base in Texas last week. The factors that cause certain men and women to snap under pressure are as unpredictable as they are devastating to the individuals involved and those around them.
NEWS
By Peter Slevin and Peter Slevin,The Washington Post | November 6, 2009
The gunshots came out of the blue. An Army psychiatrist, trained to treat soldiers under stress, allegedly opened fire Thursday in a crowded medical building at Fort Hood, Texas. When the assault ended minutes later, the attack had become what is believed to be the largest mass shooting ever to occur on a U.S. military base. Twelve were killed and 31 wounded. Nidal Malik Hasan, a major who had made a career in the military, fired a pair of pistols, one a semiautomatic, shooting and scattering people as they waited to see doctors, according to authorities.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2007
Marcy Gorsline has her own stories to tell about the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, similar to the tales of squalor and neglect that spawned congressional hearings last week and led to the firing of the hospital's commander. Hers involve the care of her son, Pfc. Caleb Lufkin, who was injured by a roadside bomb in Baghdad last May and spent three weeks recovering at Walter Reed. The sink in his room kept clogging, she said, and workers left the bathroom coated with black filth whenever they finished with the plunger.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 5, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Congressional Democrats kept up their attacks yesterday on substandard care for injured soldiers at Walter Reed Army Medical Center as they prepared for hearings on the issue this week. "If it's this bad at the outpatient facilities at Walter Reed, how is it in the rest of the country?" Sen. Charles E. Schumer, a New York Democrat, said on ABC's This Week. "Walter Reed is our crown jewel." In a letter sent yesterday to Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, Schumer called for the creation of an independent commission to examine conditions at all medical facilities treating military personnel and veterans.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
The floors were lacquered and shining, the grass was mowed, and the handicapped-access tracks and ramps in the new, $800,000 Pasadena home were ready for use. Just miles away, in Washington, Sgt. David Battle, a triple amputee from injuries he suffered in Iraq, sat in the small suite he, his wife, Lakeisa, and four children have shared at Walter Reed Army Medical Center for the past year and a half. Their bags were packed. A nonprofit group, Homes for Our Troops, and hundreds of Maryland volunteers had built the home from scratch.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | July 4, 2008
BETHESDA - President Bush turned a spade of dirt to ceremonially launch a major expansion of one of the nation's premier military hospitals yesterday, saying he hoped a new Walter Reed National Military Medical Center "will be the site of many miracles of healing." Flanked by officers, soldiers and civilian military leaders, Bush joined Rep. Chris Van Hollen of Montgomery County and Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown in dipping a gold-painted shovel into a container of soil in the shadow of the art deco tower that is the centerpiece of the National Naval Medical Center.
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