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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 23, 2002
SUN SCORE ***1/2 Undisputed is the best action film of the summer. Even though it has relatively few big action scenes and almost no special effects, it plays like one uninterrupted streak of action, because violence menaces the characters like a storm cloud when it isn't slicing through their milieu like lightning. The tale is simple: A heavyweight boxing champ named Iceman (Ving Rhames) lands in the slammer and discovers that the quickest way out is to fight the prison program's boxing champ, Monroe (Wesley Snipes)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
When Walter Hill was flipping through the first 40 pages of the science fiction/horror script that became "Alien," he considered it turgid, a snooze. "I thought it was just terrible," said Hill, who co-wrote and co-produced the movie with his partner, David Giler. It barely diverted Hill from watching Jimmy Carter's acceptance speech at the 1976 Democratic convention, which was on his TV in the background. Then Hill got to the now-infamous "chest-burster scene," where a creepy little critter — with a head like a slimy, tiny sperm whale — explodes from the chest of a spaceship's executive officer and traumatizes the crew.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
When Walter Hill was flipping through the first 40 pages of the science fiction/horror script that became "Alien," he considered it turgid, a snooze. "I thought it was just terrible," said Hill, who co-wrote and co-produced the movie with his partner, David Giler. It barely diverted Hill from watching Jimmy Carter's acceptance speech at the 1976 Democratic convention, which was on his TV in the background. Then Hill got to the now-infamous "chest-burster scene," where a creepy little critter — with a head like a slimy, tiny sperm whale — explodes from the chest of a spaceship's executive officer and traumatizes the crew.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
From her breakthrough with Near Dark, a contemporary vampire movie featuring undead who roam the West in a van, Kathryn Bigelow has broken new ground for female movie directors. Simply following her instincts for atmosphere and suspense, she's become a specialist in fable and adventure. Even skeptics acknowledge her knack for splashy action-film iconography in movies like Point Break, which turned Keanu Reeves into a Gen-X version of the strong, silent type and showcased Patrick Swayze as a specialist in tough-guy karma while mixing surfing and grand larceny.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
For Ralph Henry, the 104th Army-Navy game tomorrow is his last and very nearly his first. For Walter Hill, it is his first and most certainly not his last. The two Baltimore-bred players, one a senior in Annapolis, the other a plebe at West Point, will bring diametrically opposite perspectives onto Philadelphia's Lincoln Financial Field tomorrow, with both hoping to make a distinct impact on the outcome. The Army-Navy experience is the one career highlight that has virtually eluded Henry, the veteran who is listed to start at defensive end for the Midshipmen.
NEWS
October 29, 2005
On Tuesday, October 25, 2005, BARBARA CURRY HILL, devoted wife of Walter Hill Sr., beloved mother of Walter Hill Jr., Lindsey Hill and Christine Curtis. Loving daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Curry. Loving sister of Deborah Campbell, Robin Riley and Marc Curry. She is also survived by many loving sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of other relatives and friends. The family will receive friends at the New Psalmist Baptist Church, 4501M-l Old Frederick Rd., Balto.
NEWS
October 24, 2004
On October 21, 2004, JOHN A. HILL, 80, formerly of Baltimore. He was a Shop Foreman and Auto Mechanic. He is survived by his wife, Freta and his children, John A. Hill, III, Walter Hill, Iva Heishman, Ruthie Marie Bonta, Margaret Sue Luft and Joanne Wagner; a sister, Margie Kilgore; eleven grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Services will be held on Monday, October 25, 2 P.M. at the Bethany Chapel of Melson Funeral Services, West Avenue, Ocean View, DE, where friends may call from 2 until 4 P.M. on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
From her breakthrough with Near Dark, a contemporary vampire movie featuring undead who roam the West in a van, Kathryn Bigelow has broken new ground for female movie directors. Simply following her instincts for atmosphere and suspense, she's become a specialist in fable and adventure. Even skeptics acknowledge her knack for splashy action-film iconography in movies like Point Break, which turned Keanu Reeves into a Gen-X version of the strong, silent type and showcased Patrick Swayze as a specialist in tough-guy karma while mixing surfing and grand larceny.
FEATURES
By Zap2it | January 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES - HBO has ordered 13 episodes of Deadwood, a Western that will blend fictional and real-life characters from the post-Civil War era. The series, created by former NYPD Blue and Hill Street Blues writer-producer David Milch, is set to begin production in the spring. It will likely premiere in 2004. The series begins in Deadwood, S.D., in 1876, two weeks after Custer's defeat at Little Big Horn. Timothy Olyphant stars as Seth Bullock, a former marshal who's trying to set up a mercantile business in the town.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 25, 2006
ROBERT DUVALL MIGHT BE GOING A little overboard when he says, "The Russians have Chekhov, and the English have Shakespeare; we have the Western." But if the Academy Award-winning actor and producer was overstating the literary importance of America's most durable genre, it wasn't by much: Despite recurring predictions of the Western's demise, tonight's prime-time lineup will feature a new episode of HBO's graphic and operatic series Deadwood. And at the same time, AMC 's first original movie, Broken Trail, a spellbinding frontier epic starring Duvall and directed by Walter Hill (Geronimo: An American Legend)
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 25, 2006
ROBERT DUVALL MIGHT BE GOING A little overboard when he says, "The Russians have Chekhov, and the English have Shakespeare; we have the Western." But if the Academy Award-winning actor and producer was overstating the literary importance of America's most durable genre, it wasn't by much: Despite recurring predictions of the Western's demise, tonight's prime-time lineup will feature a new episode of HBO's graphic and operatic series Deadwood. And at the same time, AMC 's first original movie, Broken Trail, a spellbinding frontier epic starring Duvall and directed by Walter Hill (Geronimo: An American Legend)
NEWS
October 29, 2005
On Tuesday, October 25, 2005, BARBARA CURRY HILL, devoted wife of Walter Hill Sr., beloved mother of Walter Hill Jr., Lindsey Hill and Christine Curtis. Loving daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Curry. Loving sister of Deborah Campbell, Robin Riley and Marc Curry. She is also survived by many loving sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of other relatives and friends. The family will receive friends at the New Psalmist Baptist Church, 4501M-l Old Frederick Rd., Balto.
NEWS
October 24, 2004
On October 21, 2004, JOHN A. HILL, 80, formerly of Baltimore. He was a Shop Foreman and Auto Mechanic. He is survived by his wife, Freta and his children, John A. Hill, III, Walter Hill, Iva Heishman, Ruthie Marie Bonta, Margaret Sue Luft and Joanne Wagner; a sister, Margie Kilgore; eleven grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Services will be held on Monday, October 25, 2 P.M. at the Bethany Chapel of Melson Funeral Services, West Avenue, Ocean View, DE, where friends may call from 2 until 4 P.M. on Sunday.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
For Ralph Henry, the 104th Army-Navy game tomorrow is his last and very nearly his first. For Walter Hill, it is his first and most certainly not his last. The two Baltimore-bred players, one a senior in Annapolis, the other a plebe at West Point, will bring diametrically opposite perspectives onto Philadelphia's Lincoln Financial Field tomorrow, with both hoping to make a distinct impact on the outcome. The Army-Navy experience is the one career highlight that has virtually eluded Henry, the veteran who is listed to start at defensive end for the Midshipmen.
FEATURES
By Zap2it | January 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES - HBO has ordered 13 episodes of Deadwood, a Western that will blend fictional and real-life characters from the post-Civil War era. The series, created by former NYPD Blue and Hill Street Blues writer-producer David Milch, is set to begin production in the spring. It will likely premiere in 2004. The series begins in Deadwood, S.D., in 1876, two weeks after Custer's defeat at Little Big Horn. Timothy Olyphant stars as Seth Bullock, a former marshal who's trying to set up a mercantile business in the town.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 23, 2002
SUN SCORE ***1/2 Undisputed is the best action film of the summer. Even though it has relatively few big action scenes and almost no special effects, it plays like one uninterrupted streak of action, because violence menaces the characters like a storm cloud when it isn't slicing through their milieu like lightning. The tale is simple: A heavyweight boxing champ named Iceman (Ving Rhames) lands in the slammer and discovers that the quickest way out is to fight the prison program's boxing champ, Monroe (Wesley Snipes)
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
Gilman's Ambrose Wooden patterns his game after Virginia Tech's Michael Vick, and in yesterday's 41-0 rout at unranked St. Paul's, the 6-foot, 180-pound sophomore quarterback did his best imitation of him. Employing his sub-4.3-second speed in the 40-yard dash, Wooden darted his way to 209 of Gilman's 344 rushing yards and scores of 22, 12 and 85 yards. Gilman (3-0) won its 24th straight game and collected its 13th shutout in that span, having outscored opponents by a combined 847-124.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
Archbishop Curley's homecoming crowd will christen a 2000-capacity stadium this Saturday when the Friars meet Cardinal Gibbons at 1 p.m. The fans will witness what could be quite a game in a comfortable venue that boasts terrace seating and an outdoor concession stand complete with restrooms. The project cost more than $500,000. Curley (5-2, 2-0) and Cardinal Gibbons (7-1, 3-0) meet in a game that could yield the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association's B Conference Gold Division champ.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
Archbishop Curley's homecoming crowd will christen a 2000-capacity stadium this Saturday when the Friars meet Cardinal Gibbons at 1 p.m. The fans will witness what could be quite a game in a comfortable venue that boasts terrace seating and an outdoor concession stand complete with restrooms. The project cost more than $500,000. Curley (5-2, 2-0) and Cardinal Gibbons (7-1, 3-0) meet in a game that could yield the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association's B Conference Gold Division champ.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
Gilman's Ambrose Wooden patterns his game after Virginia Tech's Michael Vick, and in yesterday's 41-0 rout at unranked St. Paul's, the 6-foot, 180-pound sophomore quarterback did his best imitation of him. Employing his sub-4.3-second speed in the 40-yard dash, Wooden darted his way to 209 of Gilman's 344 rushing yards and scores of 22, 12 and 85 yards. Gilman (3-0) won its 24th straight game and collected its 13th shutout in that span, having outscored opponents by a combined 847-124.
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