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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1997
Too many repeats on the networks tonight. Thank goodness for Walter Cronkite and the Discovery Channel."Diagnosis Murder" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- When the hospital administrator trying to force Dr. Sloan into early retirement turns up dead, guess who the most likely suspect is? Of course he didn't do it, but the guy who did is going to make sure Sloan takes the fall -- unless the good doctor is willing to do him a small favor. (Anyone who notices a slight resemblance between this repeat from April and Alfred Hitchcock's "Strangers On a Train," I'm sure it's only a coincidence.
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NEWS
April 28, 2012
In Rafael Medoff's recent op-ed ("The president and the Jews," April 24), he makes two basic contentions. One is that President Barack Obama regards Israel as a "nuisance. " The second is that the purveyor of that opinion, Gary Rosenblatt, editor of the Jewish Weekly, may turn out to be like Walter Cronkite in his influence on voters. Regarding the first assertion as to Mr. Obama viewing Israel as a "nuisance," here is what President Obama has done regarding it: He killed Osama bin Laden.
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FEATURES
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 19, 2006
Walter Cronkite inspired viewer respect of unusual depth. He was "Uncle Walter," and a poll dubbed him "the most trusted man in America." Such high regard might seem fantastic to anyone who never saw Cronkite anchor the CBS Evening News from 1962 to 1981. A stirring new documentary, Walter Cronkite: Witness to History, explains his timeless appeal. Cronkite, 89, gained his status through hard work and a quick grasp of the new medium. Walter Cronkite: Witness To History airs at 9 tonight on PBS.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
CBS made it official Tuesday: Charlie Rose and Gayle King will be the latest in a long, long line of TV personalities tasked with lifting CBS out of last place in the mornings. Walter Cronkite and the puppet Charlemagne couldn't do it. Diane Sawyer and Charles Kuralt couldn't either. Some say God in heaven and all his/her angels couldn't make "The Early Show" competitive with NBC's "Today" and ABC's "Good Morning America. " But CBS News will hand the baton to Rose and King starting Jan. 9 and hope for the best.
NEWS
March 26, 2000
Sig Mickelson, 86, who helped build CBS News during the early days of television and made Walter Cronkite a national news figure, died Friday at Scripps-Mercy Hospital in San Diego of complications from pneumonia, his wife, Elena, said yesterday. He had been hospitalized since Monday.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
In Rafael Medoff's recent op-ed ("The president and the Jews," April 24), he makes two basic contentions. One is that President Barack Obama regards Israel as a "nuisance. " The second is that the purveyor of that opinion, Gary Rosenblatt, editor of the Jewish Weekly, may turn out to be like Walter Cronkite in his influence on voters. Regarding the first assertion as to Mr. Obama viewing Israel as a "nuisance," here is what President Obama has done regarding it: He killed Osama bin Laden.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | November 20, 1991
It took Harry Smith about, oh, a second and a half to accept a guest shot on "Murphy Brown.""I think it's a hoot," said the "CBS This Morning" co-host, the latest big-name new celebrity -- including Connie Chung, Linda Ellerbee and Walter Cronkite -- to appear on the CBS sitcom. "They called out of the blue. It's not something I campaigned for."At first, "Murphy" "was so frighteningly familiar and real, I thought one of the producers on our staff was writing under a 'nom de plume,'" said Smith, 40. "Now it's not as spooky as it used to be. Maybe I'm used to it."
NEWS
March 18, 2005
Mary Elizabeth "Betsy" Cronkite, 89, the wife of former CBS News anchorman Walter Cronkite, died of cancer complications Wednesday at their Manhattan apartment. Walter Cronkite met Mary Elizabeth Maxwell while they were working at radio station KCMO in Kansas City, Mo. They married in 1940, and shortly afterward she became women's editor of the Kansas City Journal-Post. While her husband was overseas reporting for United Press during much of World War II, she worked for Hallmark, publishing a company newspaper that also was distributed to members of the armed forces.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 22, 2009
Walter Cronkite, once the most trusted man in America and a leading figure in broadcast journalism's Mount Rushmore, believed the nation's war on drugs was unwinnable, and he said so on television. A decade after his years with CBS News, Mr. Cronkite succeeded in raising public awareness of the war's futility - an impressive accomplishment. Of course, Mr. Cronkite is famous for having reached the same correct conclusion about the Vietnam War in 1968. All of his obituaries have recalled Mr. Cronkite's special report from Vietnam, his characterization of the war as stalemate and his call for a negotiated peace.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Every election year politicians share the same fantasy, whether they are Democratic or Republican, conservative or liberal: to have unfettered access to the airwaves without interference from reporters, opponents or even League of Women Voters moderators.The voting public has a deep-seated desire, too: It wants a campaign free of nasty personal attacks, negative commercials and ideas-free political discourse.Yesterday, with the announcement by ABC that it will join the other networks in providing free air time during the closing days of the 1996 presidential campaign, both candidates and voters might have witnessed a small step toward the realization of their dreams.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
A media mogul, a surfboard industry pioneer, a coach of disabled athletes and the first man to sail solo around the world are among the inaugural inductees to the National Sailing Hall of Fame, a Maryland institution working to build a permanent home on the Annapolis waterfront. Next weekend's induction ceremony, to be held at the San Diego Yacht Club in California, comes six years after the National Sailing Center and Hall of Fame was formed to promote sailing and recognize men and women who have made "outstanding contributions" to the sport.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
If the only thing that Don Hewitt had done in his six decades at CBS News had been to invent the phenomenally successful "60 Minutes," he would still have been one of the two most influential producers in the history of the medium. But Hewitt's legacy reaches far beyond "60 Minutes." For starters, each time viewers tune into a network newscast, they are experiencing something partially invented in the frenzied and fertile imagination of Hewitt, who died Wednesday at his Bridgehampton, N.Y., home of pancreatic cancer.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 22, 2009
Walter Cronkite, once the most trusted man in America and a leading figure in broadcast journalism's Mount Rushmore, believed the nation's war on drugs was unwinnable, and he said so on television. A decade after his years with CBS News, Mr. Cronkite succeeded in raising public awareness of the war's futility - an impressive accomplishment. Of course, Mr. Cronkite is famous for having reached the same correct conclusion about the Vietnam War in 1968. All of his obituaries have recalled Mr. Cronkite's special report from Vietnam, his characterization of the war as stalemate and his call for a negotiated peace.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | July 18, 2009
Former CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite, who was named the "most trusted man in America" in a 1972 poll and came to personify the golden age of network TV news, died Friday. He was 92. Mr. Cronkite's longtime chief of staff, Marlene Adler, said Mr. Cronkite died at 7:42 p.m. at his Manhattan home surrounded by family. She said the cause of death was cerebral vascular disease. Known for his avuncular camera presence and fierce commitment to fact-based journalism, Mr. Cronkite was the face and voice that most Americans turned to from 1962 to 1981, when the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite became TV's most influential news franchise.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | September 24, 2006
If there is such a thing as an unpretentious 64-foot yacht, the two-masted vessel owned by Walter Cronkite is it. While some owners turn their boats into floating jewel boxes, Cronkite's Wyntje is the kind of boat on which you could spill your lemonade and not worry about being thrown overboard. "He has [the boat] to sail. Not sit in the harbor," said J. Holt, the yacht's smiley 28-year-old captain. "It is very family-friendly." The upholstery is faded, and the wood panels gleam but don't overwhelm.
FEATURES
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 19, 2006
Walter Cronkite inspired viewer respect of unusual depth. He was "Uncle Walter," and a poll dubbed him "the most trusted man in America." Such high regard might seem fantastic to anyone who never saw Cronkite anchor the CBS Evening News from 1962 to 1981. A stirring new documentary, Walter Cronkite: Witness to History, explains his timeless appeal. Cronkite, 89, gained his status through hard work and a quick grasp of the new medium. Walter Cronkite: Witness To History airs at 9 tonight on PBS.
NEWS
February 6, 2003
An interview with Thea Jones, founding member of Renaissance book club. When did your group get started? A group of us decided to do this about 1980. ... We were working together as members of the Friends of the Howard County Library, and ... we thought that it would be a great idea to have a book club with men and women in it so that there would be cross-gender discussion, if I can say it that way. And we convinced our husbands that it would be a great idea. What book are members reading this month?
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
CBS made it official Tuesday: Charlie Rose and Gayle King will be the latest in a long, long line of TV personalities tasked with lifting CBS out of last place in the mornings. Walter Cronkite and the puppet Charlemagne couldn't do it. Diane Sawyer and Charles Kuralt couldn't either. Some say God in heaven and all his/her angels couldn't make "The Early Show" competitive with NBC's "Today" and ABC's "Good Morning America. " But CBS News will hand the baton to Rose and King starting Jan. 9 and hope for the best.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
Mary Elizabeth "Betsy" Cronkite, 89, the wife of former CBS News anchorman Walter Cronkite, died of cancer complications Wednesday at their Manhattan apartment. Walter Cronkite met Mary Elizabeth Maxwell while they were working at radio station KCMO in Kansas City, Mo. They married in 1940, and shortly afterward she became women's editor of the Kansas City Journal-Post. While her husband was overseas reporting for United Press during much of World War II, she worked for Hallmark, publishing a company newspaper that also was distributed to members of the armed forces.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | March 13, 2005
DAN RATHER' S final broadcast as anchor for the CBS Evening News on Wednesday was preceded by a number of articles that put his career, as a March 5 story in The Sun said, "in a harsh light." When longtime colleagues - Walter Cronkite, Mike Wallace, Don Hewitt and former Sun reporter Tom Fenton - criticize your work and even say they preferred the competitions', the judgments are indeed "harsh." Rather, who had a remarkable reporting career, from the assassination of John F. Kennedy to the Watergate scandal to Abu Ghraib, has been getting hammered from all sides.
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