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Walter Baker

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NEWS
January 31, 1994
C "An overwhelming number of Marylanders want tougher gun laws," Gov. William Donald Schaefer said in his State of the State address earlier this month. "Gun legislation can't be bottled up in a committee." Yet that is exactly what Cecil County's Sen. Walter M. Baker has in mind.Senator Baker is chairman of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee. As far as he's concerned, the only good handgun bill is a dead handgun bill. The fact that public opinion polls indicate overwhelming sentiment in favor of tougher handgun restrictions doesn't faze him. The fact that nearly as many Marylanders die from handgun wounds as from auto accidents doesn't seem to matter a bit. Nor does the Cecil County chairman seem upset that his stance is viewed by a growing number of his Senate colleagues as outdated and damaging to them politically.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Former state Sen. Walter M. Baker, who had served in the legislature representing the upper Eastern Shore for more than two decades and also had been a Cecil County attorney, died Tuesday of complications from diabetes at Christiana Hospital in Delaware. The longtime Elkton resident was 84. "Walter was a lifelong Democrat. He was from a large family that was rural and poor, and he grew up with a great sense of values," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. "He was conservative, and loved the Eastern Shore and reflected its conservative values.
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NEWS
January 20, 1996
YEAR AFTER YEAR, handgun legislation in the General Assembly has run afoul of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee and its conservative chairman, Walter Baker of Cecil County. But last week, Mr. Baker shocked gun-control supporters and dumbfounded the gun lobby by embracing major elements of the governor's reform legislation. Prospects for meaningful changes in current handgun laws have brightened considerably.As it now stands, criminals have no trouble obtaining all the handguns they want through legal means.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 11, 2002
THERE ARE no moral victories," Navy football coach Paul Johnson said after Saturday's Saint Vito's Day loss to Notre Dame at Unitas Stadium in Baltimore. I know he was disappointed - a few million Americans were - that the Midshipmen could not hold their 23-15 lead and ended up losing to the Fumblin' Irish, 30-23. And I know the coach was being bugged by sportswriters for a quote, and maybe he's not much of a spin doctor and doesn't try to prescribe that kind of medicine. A loss is an L in the record books, no matter what anyone says.
NEWS
April 19, 1994
IN THE waning weeks of the General Assembly session, Sen. Walter Baker half-heartedly tried to introduce a bill to let Eastern Shore voters decide whether they want to secede from Maryland. Not everyone took the idea lightly. The bill touched a nerve.The Eastern Shore has traditionally been scoffed at by some living west of the Chesapeake, who have viewed those on the Shore as reactionaries and rednecks. Remember Gov. William Donald Schaefer's X-rated comment about the Shore's backward condition?
NEWS
January 27, 1994
It is no secret in Annapolis that the biggest impediments to handgun control are Cecil County Sen. Walter Baker and his Judicial Proceedings Committee. Already this session, Mr. Baker has sworn to kill any and all handgun legislation that comes before his committee. "Banning guns has nothing to do with crime," he said. Mr. Baker's Senate colleagues, though, have other ideas.Their concern is that opposing handgun controls in an election year could be political dynamite, especially for incumbents running in urban or close-in suburban communities where crime is a dominant campaign issue.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 27, 2000
WALTER Baker, the bushy-browed state senator from Cecil County, must feel the fatigue deep in his bones, poor man. He's 73 years old and he's been going to Annapolis for the past 22 -- longer than anyone should, really -- and he's fought the good fight against the progress of the law and the excess of human emotion. Poor man. Think of all the stories he's had to hear as chairman of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee: stories about kids being accidentally shot by handguns, stories about somebody's husband or sister killed with a gun in a holdup.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1996
In a surprise turnaround that boosts the prospects for Gov. Parris N. Glendening's gun control proposal, the legislature's most powerful gun rights advocate said yesterday he supports limiting handgun sales in Maryland.Sen. Walter M. Baker, who chairs a key Senate committee that routinely kills gun control bills, said he could support limiting commercial handgun sales to one or two per person a month as well as restrictions on private sales."I have no problem with that," the conservative Eastern Shore Democrat said of limiting handgun sales, a proposal designed to reduce the flow of illegal firearms to criminals.
NEWS
February 11, 1992
Four pieces of progressive legislation in Annapolis are in grave jeopardy because of the intransigent attitude of one state senator, Walter Baker of Cecil County. Bills on helmets for motorcyclists, firearms safety, assault weapons and domestic violence all are threatened by Mr. Baker's misguided conservatism, which is sadly out of touch with the 1990s.These are sensible bills designed to ensure the safety of Marylanders. They are the kinds of measures a smart-thinking conservative could support.
NEWS
October 8, 1999
Nobuko Schlicker, 65, homemaker, gourmet cookNobuko Schlicker, a homemaker, died Tuesday of liver disease at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 65 and lived in Rossville.In 1957, she married Merrill Schlicker, a Navy yeoman chief who retired in 1968. They lived in Norfolk and Manassas, Va., and Paris before moving to Baltimore County in 1972.Born in Taiwan, the former Nobuko Kawamoto moved to Okayama,Japan, at 12 and was educated there. She later worked there as a waitress. A gourmet cook who enjoyed making Asian dishes, she was an avid 10-pin bowler and a fan of the Washington Redskins.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 27, 2000
WALTER Baker, the bushy-browed state senator from Cecil County, must feel the fatigue deep in his bones, poor man. He's 73 years old and he's been going to Annapolis for the past 22 -- longer than anyone should, really -- and he's fought the good fight against the progress of the law and the excess of human emotion. Poor man. Think of all the stories he's had to hear as chairman of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee: stories about kids being accidentally shot by handguns, stories about somebody's husband or sister killed with a gun in a holdup.
NEWS
October 8, 1999
Nobuko Schlicker, 65, homemaker, gourmet cookNobuko Schlicker, a homemaker, died Tuesday of liver disease at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 65 and lived in Rossville.In 1957, she married Merrill Schlicker, a Navy yeoman chief who retired in 1968. They lived in Norfolk and Manassas, Va., and Paris before moving to Baltimore County in 1972.Born in Taiwan, the former Nobuko Kawamoto moved to Okayama,Japan, at 12 and was educated there. She later worked there as a waitress. A gourmet cook who enjoyed making Asian dishes, she was an avid 10-pin bowler and a fan of the Washington Redskins.
NEWS
January 20, 1996
YEAR AFTER YEAR, handgun legislation in the General Assembly has run afoul of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee and its conservative chairman, Walter Baker of Cecil County. But last week, Mr. Baker shocked gun-control supporters and dumbfounded the gun lobby by embracing major elements of the governor's reform legislation. Prospects for meaningful changes in current handgun laws have brightened considerably.As it now stands, criminals have no trouble obtaining all the handguns they want through legal means.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1996
In a surprise turnaround that boosts the prospects for Gov. Parris N. Glendening's gun control proposal, the legislature's most powerful gun rights advocate said yesterday he supports limiting handgun sales in Maryland.Sen. Walter M. Baker, who chairs a key Senate committee that routinely kills gun control bills, said he could support limiting commercial handgun sales to one or two per person a month as well as restrictions on private sales."I have no problem with that," the conservative Eastern Shore Democrat said of limiting handgun sales, a proposal designed to reduce the flow of illegal firearms to criminals.
NEWS
April 19, 1994
IN THE waning weeks of the General Assembly session, Sen. Walter Baker half-heartedly tried to introduce a bill to let Eastern Shore voters decide whether they want to secede from Maryland. Not everyone took the idea lightly. The bill touched a nerve.The Eastern Shore has traditionally been scoffed at by some living west of the Chesapeake, who have viewed those on the Shore as reactionaries and rednecks. Remember Gov. William Donald Schaefer's X-rated comment about the Shore's backward condition?
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 10, 1994
A whirlwind of change is about to hit the State House. Not just in the governor's office but in the General Assembly.After tomorrow night's sine die adjournment, the rush to the exit door could resemble a stampede. There's even a chance every committee chairman in the state Senate will be replaced next session; a majority of top House leaders could be new, too.It's no longer fun playing state delegate or senator. The public blames incumbents for everything wrong with government.Citizens usually don't know the difference between a delegate in Annapolis and a councilman or commissioner back home or a congressman in Washington.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 11, 2002
THERE ARE no moral victories," Navy football coach Paul Johnson said after Saturday's Saint Vito's Day loss to Notre Dame at Unitas Stadium in Baltimore. I know he was disappointed - a few million Americans were - that the Midshipmen could not hold their 23-15 lead and ended up losing to the Fumblin' Irish, 30-23. And I know the coach was being bugged by sportswriters for a quote, and maybe he's not much of a spin doctor and doesn't try to prescribe that kind of medicine. A loss is an L in the record books, no matter what anyone says.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 10, 1994
A whirlwind of change is about to hit the State House. Not just in the governor's office but in the General Assembly.After tomorrow night's sine die adjournment, the rush to the exit door could resemble a stampede. There's even a chance every committee chairman in the state Senate will be replaced next session; a majority of top House leaders could be new, too.It's no longer fun playing state delegate or senator. The public blames incumbents for everything wrong with government.Citizens usually don't know the difference between a delegate in Annapolis and a councilman or commissioner back home or a congressman in Washington.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1994
One man appears to be standing in the way of efforts to pry Maryland legislators' fingers from a $7.9 million pot of scholarship money.With less than two weeks left in the General Assembly session, bills to abolish the legislative scholarship program are stuck in a committee led by Baltimore Sen. Clarence W. Blount. Reformers fear that he plans to let the bills die there by refusing to schedule a vote.The measures would take the college scholarships away from legislators and give them to the nonpolitical Maryland Scholarship Administration to distribute.
NEWS
February 3, 1994
Whipping post recommended for criminalsEach day, we read about the intolerable and almost unbelievable stories of violent crime and suggested cures. The most mentioned are more prisons, longer mandatory sentences and gun control.These would punish taxpayers. It costs from $25,000 to $30,000 a year to keep a criminal in prison. Gun control means taking guns from law-abiding citizens who need them more and more for personal protection.We should encourage the keeping of weapons by our citizens.
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