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By Neil Grauer and Neil Grauer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2000
Fascination with the computer technology in new animated films such as "Toy Story II" obscures a key fact: Behind all the electronic wizardry employed in creating Woody, Buzz Lightyear and their friends remains the acting talent of animators. That's right, acting talent. The fact that animators must be accomplished performers as well as superior graphic artists was emphasized forcefully by the death on Jan. 12 of Marc Davis, one of the greatest practitioners of the art in the nearly 100-year history of animation.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Former Maryland basketball star Walt Williams, who currently serves as an analyst on the team's radio broadcast at home games, said Wednesday that he heard sophomore forward Charles Mitchell being "disruptive" during a timeout in Tuesday's game against Virginia Tech. The incident led to Mitchell being sent to the locker room by Terps coach Mark Turgeon . Williams said he didn't hear or see what preceeded the timeout. “I was listening to what Mark was telling them at the under 4-minute timeout, and I could hear Charles talking too. You could hear both of them.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 11, 1993
Helen Bentley wants to be governor until she is 79, and wh not?Walt Disney plans to put a fantasy mall in the Washington suburbs to compete for tourists with the one the federal government runs downtown.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Walt Fuchs, who taught philosophy at Towson University for more than four decades, died of cancer Feb. 11 in a hospital in Gottingen, Germany. The Towson resident was 71. Born Wolfgang Walter Fuchs in Berlin and raised in Pittsburgh, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy from Duquesne University and a doctorate at Pennsylvania State University. He was a specialist in phenomenology and existential philosophy. He joined the faculty at Towson University in 1969 and taught until 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
"Just because you shot Jesse James does not make you Jesse James," Mike tells Walt late in "Hazard Pay", shooting him back to earth and, at the same, antagonizing Walt to do something stupid. The power struggle between the somehow noble Mike and ego-maniac Walt/Heisenberg continued in the third episode of "Breaking Bad's" fifth season. When Mike lays down the parameters and responsibilities of the new team in Saul's office, he assumes the role as the company's alpha male.  "I handle the business," he says sternly.
NEWS
January 24, 1998
Ronald H. Walt, 51, department store managerRonald H. Walt, a manager for Marshall's Department Store, died Dec. 23 of complications from AIDS at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 51.He joined Marshall's in 1992 and retired because of medical disability in 1995.The 30-year Baltimore resident began his retail career as an assistant manager for Sears Roebuck and Co. in 1970. He became manager of the Young's Men's Store at Harford Mall in 1975. He also worked at Macy's and Eagle Clothes.The native of Harrisburg, Pa., moved to Aberdeen in 1956 and graduated from Aberdeen High School in 1965.
NEWS
September 16, 2005
JOSEPH WALTER LAUTENBERGER, JR., 1933-2005, long time resident of Lafayette and Walnut Creek, CA., passed away at his home early Saturday morning, September 10, 2005, after a brief battle with cancer. Mr. Lautenberger was born in 1933 to Grace Burke and Joseph Walter Lautenberger in Baltimore, Maryland where he lived as a young boy and attended Baltimore Polytechnic Institute graduating in 1950. He then attended Cornell University graduating in 1954 with a degree in Mechanical Engineering.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | July 8, 1998
DENVER -- Daddy ran onto the field for his first All-Star Game, and sitting on his mommy's lap, Brody Weiss looked like the happiest, healthiest little boy in the world.His mother's eyes moistened as his father received one of the loudest ovations during pre-game introductions. Brody, 3 1/2 , bounced excitedly, a kid with blond hair and a big smile, looking so alive.The fans cheered his father as a former Rockie, yes. But little did Brody know, they were cheering for him, too, for what his family had endured.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | October 24, 1992
Contract negotiations between former University of Maryland star Walt Williams and the Sacramento Kings remain at an impasse, but indications yesterday were that the two sides are getting closer to reaching an agreement.Williams, the No. 1 pick of the Kings and the seventh player chosen overall in last June's NBA draft, rejected a seven-year, $14.7 million offer a little more than a week ago. The two sides met again Thursday in Washington, and both offered to see what concessions can be made.
SPORTS
February 2, 1996
Opponent: Springfield FalconsSite: Springfield (Mass.) Civic CenterTime: 7:35Radio: WITH (1230 AM), WAMD (970 AM)Outlook: The first time the Bandits played Springfield, in October, they lost, 8-2. "It very well could have been 15-2," said coach Bandits Walt Kyle. Nine days ago, the Falcons prevailed, 1-0. "That's a pretty good indication of how far we've come," said Kyle. Springfield has split its past 10 games, and Baltimore is on its seventh two-game win streak, having never taken three in a row this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | November 19, 2013
Beloved by all for its packed-to-the-gills karaoke action on weekends and more Jell-O shots that any human fist can shake at, Walt's Inn has been one of the tried and true dive bars of the Canton scene for ages. The very last thing you'd ever expect to see there was an actual cocktail in an actual glass. Until now. Bartender Dawn Green, a Little Italy native and part-time bartender at Walt's, will frequently concoct large-volume creations with cute names to dispense to the masses.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
The Catonsville girls soccer team spent most of Saturday's Class 4A state title game valiantly defending against talented Walt Whitman's persistent attack. Eventually, it became too big a burden. For more than 70 minutes, the No. 5 Comets turned away everything the Vikings from Montgomery County sent their way, protecting their goal with stubborn determination and poise. But Walt Whitman finally broke through with two goals in the final eight minutes - both on headers by senior forward Anna Gurney - to come away with a 2-0 win over Catonsville at UMBC Stadium.
SPORTS
From Sun staff and news services | November 3, 2013
Hall of Fame center Walt Bellamy, a four-time All-Star during 14 NBA seasons who played for the Bullets during their first two years in Baltimore, died Saturday, according to the Atlanta Hawks. He was 74. No cause of death was announced. Bellamy was an All-American at Indiana and won a gold medal in the 1960 Olympics before being the No. 1 overall pick in the 1961 draft by the Chicago Packers. He averaged 31.6 points and 19 rebounds for the Packers in 1961-62, making the All-Star team and earning the Rookie of the Year award.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 21, 2013
Cycling Walt Williams to bike 100 miles for 'Team Walt' Former Maryland men's basketball player Walt Williams will bike 100 miles in the Catoctin Challenge, a two-day mountain ride that starts Saturday. Williams, who is participating in honor of the 20th anniversary of his father's death, is hoping to recruit other cyclists and hundreds of sponsors to join "Team Walt" as he tries to raise $50,000 for Camp Greentop and the Walter A. Williams Sr. Fund. Williams works as a financial adviser at The Legacy Wealth Management Group at UBS and has been involved with Boys and Girls Clubs, raising awareness and money for charities and people with disabilities, especially children, so they have access to outdoor recreation.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - Before playing at Madison Square Garden in the 1990 ECAC Holiday Festival, Walt Williams was considered an up-and-coming player for a down-and-out program. A junior, Williams had stayed at Maryland rather than transferring to another school without penalty after the Terps were put on a harsh probation by the NCAA. Ineligible to play in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament or the NCAA tournament that season because of the sanctions, the late December tournament at a place often called "The World's Most Famous Arena" became a showcase for the 6-foot-8 guard from Temple Hills known as "The Wizard" and a program under second-year coach Gary Williams.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Whenever the Poly girls basketball players or coach Kendall Peace-Able talk about the heart of their program, the conversation always centers on defense. Thursday, the No. 8 Engineers relied on that stinginess in the final 25 seconds of the Class 4A state semifinal at UMBC's RAC Arena to hold on for a 33-32 victory over Walt Whitman and secure a berth in Saturday's state championship game. The Engineers had a 33-30 lead when their Aneah Young missed the front end of a one-and-one and the ball caromed out of bounds, giving Whitman 24.6 seconds to try to tie the game.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
In three victories for River Hill against Howard County competition last week, the 6-foot-4 senior forward averaged 22 points and nine rebounds. In a 70-58 win over Howard on Jan. 7, Moody finished with 24 points, including three 3-pointers, and 11 rebounds. He followed that with 21 points and eight rebounds in a 55-51 overtime win against Centennial, going 9-for-10 from the free-throw line and scoring 11 of the Hawks' 15 points in overtime. On Friday, he scored 21 points and added eight rebounds in the team's 57-51 victory over Reservoir.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Will consumers pay $20 for a reusable glass drinking bottle? Walt Himelstein thinks so. The Owings Mills environmental chemist and entrepreneur invented the Pure reusable glass drinking bottle, which features a shock-absorbing plastic sleeve that holds the glass together if it breaks. Himelstein, 59, hopes to tap a surging interest among environmentally conscious consumers who want their own reusable bottles, rather than buying beverages in single-use glass, metal or plastic containers.
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