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NEWS
July 29, 2005
WALRUSES STAR IN WEBCAM SHOW JUNEAU, Alaska-- Wallowing and snorting as they jockey for position on the rocks, the 2-ton walruses aren't the prettiest reality show stars. But two cameras installed at the Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary off Alaska's southwest coast are giving scientists and Web surfers alike the chance to watch the mammals rest and play in their natural environment. Joe Meehan, a Fish & Game lands and refuges coordinator, said the "walrus cams" on Round Island in Bristol Bay, an arm of the Bering Sea, provide an essential research tool for wildlife biologists and entertainment for wildlife enthusiasts.
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,rick.maese@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
Ever wonder what professional golfers chat about when the television cameras are off and the galleries are sequestered far away? Me, too. Until this week at least, when I found myself inside the ropes of the Champions Tour. For a full day, I was like a National Geographic wildlife guide, studying this curious breed of golfus nontigris professionalium at the Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship. Lurking in the shade of the 11th tee box, I spotted our subject - a 53-year-old specimen called Brad Bryant.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 15, 1992
SEATTLE -- A two-year federal undercover operation has broken up one of the biggest illegal wildlife slaughters in modern Alaska history.Drugs, savagely beheaded animals, traditional Eskimo lifestyles and tourists' fancy for ivory all are intertwined in the case.So far, 29 people in Alaska -- Eskimos as well as non-natives -- have been charged, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says at least 80 others could be arrested in the massacre of protected walrus to provide ivory for the tourist trade.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | August 26, 2007
WAINWRIGHT, Alaska -- The Arctic sea ice in northwestern Alaska is usually within 30 miles of Wainwright in August. Today it's more than 300 miles away, much farther than it has ever been. Wainwright hunters have usually bagged more than 100 walruses by this time in the season. They've bagged fewer than 20 this year. The ice left Wainwright so quickly in June -- a month earlier than usual -- that Oliver Peetook didn't have the chance to get a walrus. Like most Wainwright families, the Peetooks -- Oliver has four children -- usually fill the freezer with three or four of them, butchering the animals on the ice where they've been shot.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 17, 2007
The majesty and poignancy of March of the Penguins hasn't dimmed in memory, but good intentions kill great footage in Arctic Tale, this North Pole follow-up that chronicles the life cycles of polar bears and walruses in an age of global warming. It should give comedian Stephen Colbert's liberal-hating, bear-phobic persona on The Colbert Report enough material for a year's worth of "Threatdowns" and "Wags of the Finger." Directors Adam Ravetch and Sarah Robertson capture images that are astonishing in intimacy and action.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | April 16, 1992
JERUSALEM -- The walrus, of course, was crazy. He would have loved it here."The time has come . . . to talk of many things," the walrus said in "Alice Through the Looking Glass." "Of shoes -- and ships -- and sealing wax -- of cabbages and kings -- and why the sea is boiling hot -- and whether pigs have wings."As with the walrus, many of the everyday acts of life here seem to make sense only when viewed through a looking glass.The lens is ground of politics, and it magnifies such mundane matters as choosing the color of a new car, meeting someone for lunch, or in what order one may tie one's shoelaces in the morning.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 12, 2003
IT WAS A VALIANT effort traipsing across the putting green and driving range in our hot and heavy pursuit of "The Walrus." Alas, Craig Stadler had vanished from view at Hayfields Country Club yesterday. Where did he disappear to so fast? Why the rush? Didn't anyone tell "The Walrus" that at this Constellation Energy Classic stop on the Champions Tour, the tone and tenor is supposed to be different from the regular tour? This is Hunt Valley, for goodness sakes, not Hootie's hallowed golfing grounds of Augusta National.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,rick.maese@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
Ever wonder what professional golfers chat about when the television cameras are off and the galleries are sequestered far away? Me, too. Until this week at least, when I found myself inside the ropes of the Champions Tour. For a full day, I was like a National Geographic wildlife guide, studying this curious breed of golfus nontigris professionalium at the Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship. Lurking in the shade of the 11th tee box, I spotted our subject - a 53-year-old specimen called Brad Bryant.
NEWS
By Joe S. Loya | August 27, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- I never thought Jimmy Smits looked like a NYPD cop. He's a pretty boy. Hollywood rarely gets the law-enforcement look right. New York police officers look more like those photos of Officer Justin Volpe and Officer Charles Schwarz -- the men accused of raping Abner Louima with a toilet plunger while shouting racial epithets.New York's Mayor Rudolph Giuliani is searching for an explanation. Why did peace officers, sworn to protect and serve, sit around and do nothing while Mr. Louima screamed under torture?
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | August 26, 2007
WAINWRIGHT, Alaska -- The Arctic sea ice in northwestern Alaska is usually within 30 miles of Wainwright in August. Today it's more than 300 miles away, much farther than it has ever been. Wainwright hunters have usually bagged more than 100 walruses by this time in the season. They've bagged fewer than 20 this year. The ice left Wainwright so quickly in June -- a month earlier than usual -- that Oliver Peetook didn't have the chance to get a walrus. Like most Wainwright families, the Peetooks -- Oliver has four children -- usually fill the freezer with three or four of them, butchering the animals on the ice where they've been shot.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 17, 2007
The majesty and poignancy of March of the Penguins hasn't dimmed in memory, but good intentions kill great footage in Arctic Tale, this North Pole follow-up that chronicles the life cycles of polar bears and walruses in an age of global warming. It should give comedian Stephen Colbert's liberal-hating, bear-phobic persona on The Colbert Report enough material for a year's worth of "Threatdowns" and "Wags of the Finger." Directors Adam Ravetch and Sarah Robertson capture images that are astonishing in intimacy and action.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
WALRUSES STAR IN WEBCAM SHOW JUNEAU, Alaska-- Wallowing and snorting as they jockey for position on the rocks, the 2-ton walruses aren't the prettiest reality show stars. But two cameras installed at the Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary off Alaska's southwest coast are giving scientists and Web surfers alike the chance to watch the mammals rest and play in their natural environment. Joe Meehan, a Fish & Game lands and refuges coordinator, said the "walrus cams" on Round Island in Bristol Bay, an arm of the Bering Sea, provide an essential research tool for wildlife biologists and entertainment for wildlife enthusiasts.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 12, 2003
IT WAS A VALIANT effort traipsing across the putting green and driving range in our hot and heavy pursuit of "The Walrus." Alas, Craig Stadler had vanished from view at Hayfields Country Club yesterday. Where did he disappear to so fast? Why the rush? Didn't anyone tell "The Walrus" that at this Constellation Energy Classic stop on the Champions Tour, the tone and tenor is supposed to be different from the regular tour? This is Hunt Valley, for goodness sakes, not Hootie's hallowed golfing grounds of Augusta National.
NEWS
By Joe S. Loya | August 27, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- I never thought Jimmy Smits looked like a NYPD cop. He's a pretty boy. Hollywood rarely gets the law-enforcement look right. New York police officers look more like those photos of Officer Justin Volpe and Officer Charles Schwarz -- the men accused of raping Abner Louima with a toilet plunger while shouting racial epithets.New York's Mayor Rudolph Giuliani is searching for an explanation. Why did peace officers, sworn to protect and serve, sit around and do nothing while Mr. Louima screamed under torture?
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | April 16, 1992
JERUSALEM -- The walrus, of course, was crazy. He would have loved it here."The time has come . . . to talk of many things," the walrus said in "Alice Through the Looking Glass." "Of shoes -- and ships -- and sealing wax -- of cabbages and kings -- and why the sea is boiling hot -- and whether pigs have wings."As with the walrus, many of the everyday acts of life here seem to make sense only when viewed through a looking glass.The lens is ground of politics, and it magnifies such mundane matters as choosing the color of a new car, meeting someone for lunch, or in what order one may tie one's shoelaces in the morning.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 15, 1992
SEATTLE -- A two-year federal undercover operation has broken up one of the biggest illegal wildlife slaughters in modern Alaska history.Drugs, savagely beheaded animals, traditional Eskimo lifestyles and tourists' fancy for ivory all are intertwined in the case.So far, 29 people in Alaska -- Eskimos as well as non-natives -- have been charged, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says at least 80 others could be arrested in the massacre of protected walrus to provide ivory for the tourist trade.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 24, 2004
Bob Keeshan, who for 30 years played television's Captain Kangaroo, trading knock-knock jokes with a moose puppet while introducing morals and civility to countless children, died yesterday at 76. Mr. Keeshan's death in Hartford, Vt., followed a long illness, according to a statement released by his son, Michael. Although Fred Rogers, who died last year, is often considered the father of children's television, Mr. Keeshan preceded him on U.S. national TV by 13 years, debuting on CBS in 1955 as an avuncular character with a walrus mustache, Buster Brown wig, baggy jacket and beloved gaggle of Treasure House friends.
FEATURES
By Barbara M. Joosse | October 18, 1998
Mama, do you love me?Yes I do, Dear One.How much?I love you more than the raven loves his treasure, more than the dog loves his tail, more than the whale loves his spout.How long?I'll love you until the umiak flies into the darkness, till the stars turn to fish in the sky, and the puffin howls at the moon.Mama,what if I carried our eggs - our ptarmigan eggs! - and tried to be careful, and I tried to walk slowly, but I fell and the eggs broke?Then I would be sorry. But still, I would love you.What if I put salmon in your parka, ermine in your mittens, and lemmings in your mukluks?
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