Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWallpaper
IN THE NEWS

Wallpaper

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Donna Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Wild about wallpaper in theory, but not so sure you want to fully commit to one look? Then check out the hippest instant designs: peel-and-stick wall art. Decorator Jonathan Adler has teamed with Brewster Home Fashions to create a new collection for WallPops , which launched this year. The product line, which has a fun vibe, includes mix-and-match geometric prints; wall kit patterns that include colorful lanterns and a black-and-white "Love" design in capital letters; and related items such as colorful zodiac-theme dry-erase message boards.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
If you read about language, grammar, and usage, you're as likely to come across rubbish and codswallop as anything else. Thus there is joy at the arrival of a new voice of sense and informed judgment. Stan Carey of Sentence First heralded the arrival last week of Caxton , a new blog on language. Today's post at Caxton includes a reminder about the rules of language that rule-mongers would do well to keep in mind. And it is not novel information, coming from the pen of John Colet, humanist of the English Renaissance and dean of St. Paul's (d. 1519)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | June 17, 2010
Two years ago when I started stripping the wallpaper from the first of six papered rooms in my 90-year-old house, I would have never suspected that today I'd be checking out wall covering design houses online and asking decorator friends if they knew a good paper hanger. I've lived in old houses my entire adult life, and they've all had bad wallpaper in common. English ivy climbing the walls. Tiny pink and yellow flowers suspended in a burgundy field. Sometimes layers had been applied one on top of the other, strata of bad taste.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
There was a time when wallpaper was reminiscent of grandma's parlor and furniture with plastic slipcovers, but those days are so over. What's haute now: the era of wallpaper 'wow.' Wallpaper is experiencing a renaissance, design aficionados say, one that eschews staid and stuffy designs and ushers wallcoverings into the 21st century. The current crop of wallpaper is more sophisticated, incorporating bolder, exotic and art-inspired palettes. Sheila Bridges, the celebrity designer to stars like P. Diddy, has a tongue-in-cheek historical line of wallpapers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
Joan C. Moag, a family matriarch who started a successful home wallpapering business on a whim, died of complications of cancer and Alzheimer's disease Monday at the Blakehurst Retirement Community. She was 78 and had lived in Tuscany-Canterbury. Born Joan Swanson in Chicago, she attended Aquinas High School and Loyola University of Chicago. She married John Andrew Moag, a neighbor who lived on the same block, in 1953. They spent their honeymoon in Paris and lived for a year in Heidelberg, Germany, where he was stationed with the Army.
FEATURES
By BETH SMITH | October 24, 1993
When Gary and Robin Houston chose the wallpaper for the dining room of their home in Baltimore County, they did so because they loved the formal pattern and the colors. Two centuries earlier, the Phelps and Hatheway families in Suffield, Conn., must have felt the same way."Fontaine de Fleurs," with urns, flowers, swags and birds, was hand-blocked in Paris by Jean Baptiste Reveillon around 1791 and installed in the Phelps-Hatheway House sometime between 1794 and 1796. Discovered there by Henry Francis du Pont, America's premier connoisseur and collector of 17th-, 18th- and 19th-century American decorative arts, the wallpaper was carefully removed and then hung in the Federal parlor at Winterthur, du Pont's country home near Wilmington, Del., now a public museum.
FEATURES
By Gene Gary and Gene Gary,Copley News Service | November 3, 1990
Q: We rented our condominium for a year, but are now preparing to return to it as our permanent home. When we decorated it, I invested in rather expensive wallpaper. My problem is that the renters did not take good care of our condo and some of the wallpaper is now smudged with stains. I would like to clean these walls, but I am unsure how to go about it. Do you have any suggestions?A: If the wallpaper is washable, such as a vinyl or vinyl-coated paper, most stains can be removed easily by applying thick soapsuds with a soft sponge, then rinsing well with clear water.
FEATURES
By Rose Bennett Gilbert and Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service | May 23, 1993
Q: We are slowly restoring our Queen Anne Victorian house as we can afford it. The dining room walls have us puzzled. What we thought was just old embossed wallpaper turns out to be leather, tooled into intricate designs. I'm sure it was beautiful once, but now it's a mess. We've heard there's a new wallpaper that's embossed to look like leather. Do you know any more about it?A: I know that you're half right: Indeed, there are inexpensive embossed products that go up like wallpaper to create the look of intricately carved plaster, leather or wood.
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR and RITA ST.CLAIR,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 25, 1991
Q: Instead of the usual wallpaper, I had planned to cover a wall in my dining room with a fabric that I like. A friend told me that the installation method would be more complicated than for wallpaper. Do you think it's still sensible for me to pursue the fabric option?A: While I'm not an expert on installation techniques, I do think your friend has exaggerated the difficulty of applying a fabric wall covering.Latex or paper-backed fabrics can easily be affixed to a wall by a professional paperhanger.
NEWS
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
Borders, expanded vinyl, coordinating prints, ready-made ensembles and fabricated vertical blinds -- that sums up what's new in wallpapercoverings and design this year.Interior designers are finding the "fully-coordinated" look is in for their customers. Wallpaper patterns match comforters, shams and dust ruffles, curtains and accent pillows. Bathrooms play host to coordinating shower curtains, window treatments and rugs.Kitchens and bathrooms are the most wallpapered rooms in the home, says Jim Forsythe, co-owner of Wallpapers to go at the Festival at Pasadena on Ritchie Highway.
FEATURES
By Donna Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Wild about wallpaper in theory, but not so sure you want to fully commit to one look? Then check out the hippest instant designs: peel-and-stick wall art. Decorator Jonathan Adler has teamed with Brewster Home Fashions to create a new collection for WallPops , which launched this year. The product line, which has a fun vibe, includes mix-and-match geometric prints; wall kit patterns that include colorful lanterns and a black-and-white "Love" design in capital letters; and related items such as colorful zodiac-theme dry-erase message boards.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Robert Larkin's association with Oak Crest retirement community in Parkville began long before he and his wife purchased a condo there in 2001. The 86-year-old retired Baltimore City police major had contacts with Oak Crest before it even opened its doors. "I used to walk over here from Perry Hall during construction," Larkin said. "I'd wear my hard hat, [and] I got to know all the workers. That was in 1994. " There was never any doubt that the he and his wife, Gloria, would move into Oak Crest when they felt the time was right.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
With some paint and glazes, a few tools and a little time, a plain, functional front door can become a home's welcoming statement, with the rich colors and grains of oak or mahogany. A concrete column can look like marble, a ceiling can become a cloud-dappled sky and old cabinets can get new life. To get those looks and more, all homeowners have to do is go to school. The Faux School, founded in Frederick by artist Ron Layman, 41, offers classes on decorative painting techniques to amateurs and professionals alike.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
Just two years ago, Bill and Jennifer Bartley were living on a three-acre property in bucolic Mount Airy. But with their grown children moving on, they were ready for a complete change of lifestyle. So in March 2009, the Bartleys exchanged views of the countryside for a harborside city view from their new condominium at the Ritz-Carlton Residences in downtown Baltimore. "Once the kids left, we knew we'd be ready to move," Jennifer Bartley recalled. "This 'lock and leave' lifestyle is perfect for us. " Moreover, the traveling couple wanted to turn the page to a new and elegant chapter in their lives as empty nesters.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
Joan C. Moag, a family matriarch who started a successful home wallpapering business on a whim, died of complications of cancer and Alzheimer's disease Monday at the Blakehurst Retirement Community. She was 78 and had lived in Tuscany-Canterbury. Born Joan Swanson in Chicago, she attended Aquinas High School and Loyola University of Chicago. She married John Andrew Moag, a neighbor who lived on the same block, in 1953. They spent their honeymoon in Paris and lived for a year in Heidelberg, Germany, where he was stationed with the Army.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | June 18, 2010
Two years ago when I started stripping the wallpaper from the first of six papered rooms in my 90-year-old house, I would have never suspected that today I'd be checking out wall covering design houses online and asking decorator friends if they knew a good paper hanger. I've lived in old houses my entire adult life, and they've all had bad wallpaper in common. English ivy climbing the walls. Tiny pink and yellow flowers suspended in a burgundy field. Sometimes layers had been applied one on top of the other, strata of bad taste.
NEWS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2008
In the small foyer of Deni Miller and Chris Morrone's Canton rowhouse, it is impossible to take in the scene all at once. Lemon-yellow walls pop under bright, recessed lighting. Several mirrors reflect photographs on the walls opposite them. Shadow boxes and curio cabinets filled with treasures create the appearance of a well-organized, high-end second-hand shop. It is clear the house has taken on the lightheartedness of its occupants, who are eager to show it off. Miller and Morrone are the third owners of the two-story, 12-foot-by-40-foot brick house, which they purchased in 2001 for $97,500.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
From its new perch on the wall of an ornate State House meeting room, the recently unveiled portrait of former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. can finally gaze down on the $37,500 rug he ordered in early 2006. The handmade custom piece from India - featuring an 8-foot-in-diameter replica of the Maryland seal - is one of several lush touches to a $10 million renovation receiving its de facto unveiling today. Less visible will be the rich red fabric that covers faded wallpaper in Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller's inner office - part of a separate $10,000 job paid for with Senate funds, according to Miller's chief of staff, Vicki Gruber.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.