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By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 24, 1998
The Hudson Review just had its 50th birthday. It is changing editors. The outgoing editor has done the job for 50 years, the entire, full life of the publication. Frederick Morgan, founder and defining consciousness of the institution, is stepping down. As his successor, he's chosen his editing colleague of 31 years, Paula Deitz, who, not insignificantly, is also his wife.If you do not read - or even know - the Hudson Review, there's no cause for shame, though you've been missing irreplaceable joys.
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By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 24, 1998
The Hudson Review just had its 50th birthday. It is changing editors. The outgoing editor has done the job for 50 years, the entire, full life of the publication. Frederick Morgan, founder and defining consciousness of the institution, is stepping down. As his successor, he's chosen his editing colleague of 31 years, Paula Deitz, who, not insignificantly, is also his wife.If you do not read - or even know - the Hudson Review, there's no cause for shame, though you've been missing irreplaceable joys.
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NEWS
November 16, 1997
Ann Bishop, 66, a retired Miami television news anchor whose reporting career spanned four decades, died of cancer Friday. She was a reporter at WJZ-TV in Baltimore from 1965 to 1970, and over the next 25 years became the most recognized and trusted television news figure in South Florida as a reporter and co-anchor of the evening newscasts at WPLG-TV.Sara Remington, 13, the longest-surviving pediatric heart transplant recipient, died Tuesday of coronary disease in Houston. She received the heart of a 3-year-old accident victim on Nov. 1, 1984, at Texas Heart Institute.
NEWS
August 17, 1997
A new book, "My Dear Mother," by Karen Elizabeth Gordon and Holly Johnson (Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. 224 pages. $18.95), is a compilation of letters that authors, musicians and artists wrote to their mothers. Below are a few examples.My French is improving - I get along quite well now. And - don't faint - I am growing a beard.-- William FaulknerI've been eating apple pie & ice cream all over Iowa and Nebraska, where the food is so good. ... You ought to see the Cowboys out here.-- Jack KerouacWhen is the wedding, you ask me, apropos of the news of Ernest Chevalier's marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | January 26, 2003
I know noble accents And lucid, inescapable rhythms; But I know, too, That the blackbird is involved In what I know Those lines by poet Wallace Stevens helped to provide a name for a sextet of musicians devoted to new music. They call themselves eighth blackbird -- all lower case, for added effect -- because that particular verse of Stevens' Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird happens to be the eighth. Got it? The important thing is not the name, but the intent of this ensemble, which was founded in 1996 at the Oberlin Conservatory in Ohio and has been raising ear lobes ever since.
NEWS
By H. B. Johnson Jr | March 7, 1994
SIX AMERICAN POETS. Edited by Joel Conarroe. VintageBooks/Random House. 281 pages. $12.TC I FINALLY did it! I finally got through a book that otherwise would not have been a chore. I have AIDS, you see. The eyes burn, and I get too quickly tired. But enough about that. I want to talk about something more life-giving and life-sustaining. I want to talk about poetry.The wife of a dear friend of mine sent me a delicious meal last week, and his son sent me a collection of books. I consumed everything with gratitude.
NEWS
April 20, 2003
Earl King, 69, a prolific songwriter and guitarist responsible for some of the most enduring and idiosyncratic compositions in the history of R&B, died Thursday of diabetes-related complications. Over his 50-year career, Mr. King wrote and recorded hundreds of songs. His best-known compositions include the Mardi Gras standards "Big Chief" and "Street Parade"; the rollicking "Come On (Let the Good Times Roll)"; and "Trick Bag," the quintessential New Orleans R&B story-song. In his prime, he was an explosive performer, tearing sinewy solos from his Stratocaster guitar and wearing his hair in an elaborate, upraised coif.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2000
Candlelight Concerts stays comfortably in the mainstream of classical programming most of the time, offering the public a roster of gifted artists at work in the "meat and potatoes" segment of the classical repertoire. That will change dramatically Saturday evening, as Candlelight presents "eighth blackbird," a remarkable contemporary music ensemble of six players known for adventurous programming and the intensity of their performances. Molly Alicia Barth (flute), Michael Maccaferri (clarinet)
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | January 11, 1991
MUSIC, AS Wallace Stevens suggests, was feeling rather than sound last night at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra under its old boss Sergui Comissiona put on a sure-fire display of the bitterness, rage and yearnings that Dmitri Shostakovich poured into his "Symphony No. 10" in 1953 after Stalin died.Comissiona says he loves Shostakovich. Few could doubt it as he extracted from the BSO "the 10th's enormous span of feelings" let loose by the twice censured composer in that one summer of composing, eating, sleeping and composing once Stalin was gone.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | March 31, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- Sunday morning. The morning of the Seventh Day.Depending on the nature of the household and the habits of its occupants, this might be the time for a hickory-smoked cholesterol fix. For a jog down quiet suburban streets. For earnest banalities on Washington interview shows. For sleeping in.For some, Sunday morning means nice clothes and formal Sunday services, the comfort of familiar prayers and sacred music. For others, not necessarily the less devout, it can be an occasion for more private reflections on life, on time, on eternity, on death.
NEWS
By Daniel J. Kornstein and Daniel J. Kornstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1997
Creativity is highly prized but little understood. We celebrate it, we try to cultivate it, yet we know virtually nothing about it. Over the years, many theories of creativity have been offered, the most recent being Frank J. Sulloway's claim in his 1996 book "Born to Rebel" (Pantheon. 653 pages. $30.00.) that birth order determines one's creativity.Consider one more theory the last two decades or so have increased the familiarity with the phenomenon of the lawyer-writer. John Grisham, Scott Turow and dozens of wannabes have turned legal experiences into highly successful creative art. At the same time, "law and literature" has become a growing movement in law schools.
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