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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2011
For more than three decades, Maryland Public Television produced "Wall $treet Week" with Louis Rukeyser. It was a resounding success, pioneering a format that paved the way for the cable financial news shows of today. Then several years ago, MPT fired Rukeyser as part of an effort to revamp the show to compete against cable competitors. Rukeyser, who has since died, went to CNBC. "Wall $treet Week" eventually went off the air. And the station has never been able to replace its content and the millions in revenue it brought in. Now MPT news host Jeff Salkin is trying to bring back the venerable "Wall $treet Week" brand — at least to the Web. Salkin has licensed the "Wall $treet Week" name from MPT, which has owned a kind of trademark on the show since 1982.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2011
For more than three decades, Maryland Public Television produced "Wall $treet Week" with Louis Rukeyser. It was a resounding success, pioneering a format that paved the way for the cable financial news shows of today. Then several years ago, MPT fired Rukeyser as part of an effort to revamp the show to compete against cable competitors. Rukeyser, who has since died, went to CNBC. "Wall $treet Week" eventually went off the air. And the station has never been able to replace its content and the millions in revenue it brought in. Now MPT news host Jeff Salkin is trying to bring back the venerable "Wall $treet Week" brand — at least to the Web. Salkin has licensed the "Wall $treet Week" name from MPT, which has owned a kind of trademark on the show since 1982.
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NEWS
By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Staff Writer | October 4, 1992
Louis Rukeyser came to the campus of Western Maryland College yesterday morning to receive an honorary doctorate and to offer his condolences to the Class of 1993.But true to his reputation as American's foremost economic optimist, he found a silver lining to their entry into one of the slowest job markets in recent history."There may actually be an advantage to setting out in less than balmy seas," said the host of Maryland Public Television's production, "Wall Street Week."It's not in the quantity or quality of jobs, he quickly said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Jay.Hancock@baltsun.com | July 21, 2009
The woman who invented financial television doesn't live in Manhattan, doesn't own a fabulous stock portfolio and, truth to tell, never did make much money from the medium that turned Jim Cramer, Suze Orman and Louis Rukeyser into multimillionaires. Anne T. Darlington lives in a nice townhouse in Lutherville. She is as decorous as CNBC's Cramer is obnoxious, as soft-spoken as personal-finance guru Orman is hectoring. This underappreciated pioneer thinks financial TV has let the country down in recent years.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Jay.Hancock@baltsun.com | July 21, 2009
The woman who invented financial television doesn't live in Manhattan, doesn't own a fabulous stock portfolio and, truth to tell, never did make much money from the medium that turned Jim Cramer, Suze Orman and Louis Rukeyser into multimillionaires. Anne T. Darlington lives in a nice townhouse in Lutherville. She is as decorous as CNBC's Cramer is obnoxious, as soft-spoken as personal-finance guru Orman is hectoring. This underappreciated pioneer thinks financial TV has let the country down in recent years.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 5, 2002
Louis Rukeyser made clear his disdain for his former employers at Maryland Public Television on CNN last night, saying they had acted "stupidly and deceptively and gracelessly" in forcing him from the anchor's chair he had held for 32 years on Wall Street Week. As his contract's end neared, he told Larry King, MPT officials never suggested a single specific change and didn't inform him of the intent to team up with Fortune magazine on the new version of the show. He said that the program had remained relatively strong in the ratings and that the desire to overhaul the show made little sense.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 27, 2002
DON'T CRY too hard for Lou at the Wall Street Wake. Louis Rukeyser, whom People magazine called "the dismal science's only sex symbol," was sacked by Maryland Public Television on Sunday as host of one of TV's most intelligent and informative shows for 32 years. Even Johnny Carson didn't last that long. MPT moved to demote Rukeyser, 69, to third fiddle after apparently deciding Wall Street Week needs Daisy Fuentes or the Kratts' Creatures guys to make it relevant. Rukeyser balked and then blasted MPT on Friday's show, which ensured that it was his last.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 24, 2005
After struggling for three years to regain the audience and underwriters it lost since firing star Louis Rukeyser, Maryland Public Television will announce today that it is canceling one of the longest-running national franchises in TV history, Wall Street Week. The final episode of the 35-year-old, landmark PBS series - produced at MPT's Owings Mills studio and considered the prototype for financial advice programming (including entire cable channels) - will air at 8:30 p.m. June 24. For 32 years, the imposing Rukeyser presided over the hourlong Friday-night program interspersing financial insights with wry puns and idiosyncratic musings on the market.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 30, 1992
Maryland Public Television is denying a published report that it is angry at "Wall Street Week" host Louis Rukeyser because MPT is not sharing in profits from a financial newsletter Rukeyser recently launched."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 22, 2002
The 3-decade-long Louis Rukeyser era at Maryland Public Television is coming to an acrimonious close, as the pioneering financial journalist is being forced out of the anchor's chair of the program that bears his name. Starting this fall, MPT's signature program, Wall Street Week With Louis Rukeyser, will have a new format, a new name and two new anchors. Rukeyser will be replaced by Fortune magazine editorial director Geoffrey Colvin, whose publication will co-produce the show, and another anchor yet to be named.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE | May 14, 2006
The recent passing of television host and investment pundit Louis Rukeyser at age 73 was the end of an era, but it meant more to me than that. When starting out as a business reporter a couple of decades ago, I interviewed this unique fellow who was first to bring business and economic news to the masses. Fortunately, Rukeyser showed interest in my goals and discussed the potential in broad dissemination of information about money on TV and in print. He also invited me to attend a taping of his PBS television show, Wall Street Week, at Owings Mills.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 2006
Louis Rukeyser, who for 32 years presided over PBS' Wall Street Week, a landmark financial advice show developed in Owings Mills and distinguished by his keen insights, wry puns and idiosyncratic musings on the market, died yesterday at his home in Greenwich, Conn. Mr. Rukeyser, who was 73, died of multiple myeloma, a rare cancer of the bone marrow, said his brother, Bud Rukeyser. An imposing but likable on-air presence with deep voice, silver-white hair and mischievous smile, Louis Rukeyser left the airwaves in October 2003 when he started undergoing treatment for cancer.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | March 27, 2005
THE MARCH 3, 2000, edition of Wall Street Week with Louis Rukeyser, taped in Owings Mills and seen by perhaps 2 million people, was not its best. Julius Westheimer, a broker at Ferris, Baker Watts who once wrote a column for The Sun, said he was short-term bearish on stocks but recommended Intel (which fell 75 percent in less than three years before recovering somewhat); Cisco (down 80 percent); Home Depot (down 60 percent); AOL and Time Warner, which would disastrously merge; and Coke and Gillette, which did better.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 24, 2005
After struggling for three years to regain the audience and underwriters it lost since firing star Louis Rukeyser, Maryland Public Television will announce today that it is canceling one of the longest-running national franchises in TV history, Wall Street Week. The final episode of the 35-year-old, landmark PBS series - produced at MPT's Owings Mills studio and considered the prototype for financial advice programming (including entire cable channels) - will air at 8:30 p.m. June 24. For 32 years, the imposing Rukeyser presided over the hourlong Friday-night program interspersing financial insights with wry puns and idiosyncratic musings on the market.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
Louis Rukeyser, who has been absent from his CNBC financial news show since last fall, is taking an indefinite leave because of health concerns, the cable network announced yesterday. Rukeyser, who was last on the air on Oct. 31, underwent surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota for surgery to relieve pain in his back several months ago. In a statement released by CNBC yesterday, Rukeyser wrote that further tests revealed "a low-grade malignancy" that requires continued treatment. He did not return a call left at his home yesterday seeking additional comment.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
Order from chaos. On the air, that's the charge of Karen Gibbs, co-host of Wall Street Week with Fortune. Relying on years of experience as a financial and commodities analyst, she seeks to make sense of the daunting and unsettling data that cascades her way about the nation's markets for the investors who watch the PBS show. Off the air, too, Gibbs is supposed to help resurrect success for Maryland Public Television, where her arrival followed hard on the heels of the spring 2002 ouster of original Wall Street Week host Louis Rukeyser.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 10, 2002
Cut loose by Maryland Public Television, Louis Rukeyser will be appearing instead on cable financial news channel CNBC at 8:30 p.m. Fridays in a show that will compete directly with Wall Street Week - the PBS show he anchored for 32 years. In an unusual deal, commercials will be placed solely at the top and close of the new half-hour show on CNBC, just where the underwriting spots highlighting corporate sponsors appeared on the MPT program. That's meant to tailor the format for public television stations, which will be offered the opportunity to broadcast the show the weekend after it's aired twice on CNBC each Friday.
BUSINESS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 16, 1990
It's not surprising that, as Louis Rukeyser remembers, "Wall Street Week" did not start out as the program you see every Friday these days."It was supposed to be much more educational," Rukeyser said in a recent interview.In 1970, what was then called the Maryland Center for Public Broadcasting took the educational requirement of its state TC charter much more literally. It wouldn't even show a movie without some pipe-smoking scholar coming on before or after to explain the significance. So of course it wanted Rukeyser to lecture on the complexities of his chosen subject.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | August 24, 2002
Officials at Maryland Public Television are embarking on sweeping layoffs, across-the-board salary cuts, demotions of many executives and an elimination of all marketing efforts as they combat deep drops in revenue. "We've had to [cut] personnel as a last resort," Robert J. Shuman, president and chief executive officer of MPT, said yesterday. "It's been difficult across the board." MPT officials acknowledge that the budget problems have been compounded by their failure to draw any significant corporate sponsors for the station's signature program, Wall Street Week, after the ouster in spring of longtime anchor Louis Rukeyser.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | June 27, 2002
Just days before the debut of the new version of Wall Street Week With Fortune, the people out at Maryland Public Television's Owings Mills studios say they're too busy to be nervous. "I don't start getting jitters until a half-hour before we go on the air," says John T. Potthast, MPT's senior vice president for content enterprises, as he sits inside a bustling control room. A graphic artist nearby is manipulating images on one of 24 television screens before him, superimposing a series of faces over the head of a strapping male model from the cover of a fitness magazine - first actor David Hasselhoff, then MPT President and CEO Robert J. Shuman, then that of a golden retriever.
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