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By Matt Vensel | February 24, 2011
I've got another interesting and possibly worthless study for you (I should just make this a daily afternoon feature). The Wall Street Journal examined every offseason move and ranked each MLB team based on "the volume of moves it made and the net quality of the players it ended up with. " The Wall Street Journa l has a bunch of statheads over there -- and there's nothing wrong with that -- so authors Scott Cacciola and Jared Diamond used projected Wins Above Replacement (WAR)
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NEWS
September 25, 2013
One can scarcely blame an appropriately-outraged Rep. Elijah E. Cummings for calling on AIG's Robert Benmosche to step down after the CEO compared the public criticism of the generous bonuses given top finance industry executives to lynchings in the Deep South. It's hard to know even where to begin with the outrageousness of that comparison. The son of sharecroppers, the Baltimore congressman has a far better perspective on the subject of the Jim Crow era than the average individual.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
This week the Wall Street Journal's health blog celebrated its five year anniversary. And not with cake. With the Michael Phelps diet. Or, rather, with the memories of it. In a post looking back at its five years in existence, the bloggers recalled some of their biggest hits. Near the top of the list was one about the Baltimore swimmer's famously fattening power meals. "With over 475 comments and counting," the Wall Street Journal writers said, "it's still one of the most trafficked posts 3 ½ years after it was written.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Baltimore's Legg Mason Opportunity Trust, co-managed by well-known stock-picker Bill Miller, is the top-ranked U.S. diversified stock fund for the third consecutive quarter, according to a Wall Street Journal ranking. Miller and his co-manager, Samantha McLemore, buy shares that have fallen substantially because of dim prospects for the company, The Wall Street Journal said. The duo, for example, snapped up shares of Netflix and Best Buy before their stock recovery. These purchases contributed to Opportunity Trust's 55.1 percent return for the past 12 months and 31.6 percent gain for the first half of this year, the Journal said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
If you want to get a sense of how desperate things have become in Rupert Murdoch's empire, take a look at this editorial in today's Wall Street Journal. To cast what is happening in the UK -- and what certainly seems headed for the US -- as the work of Murdoch's commercial and ideological enemies might seem mad to reasonable journalists. But not to Murdoch and his chieftans. That is all they seem to know: attack, attack and try to destroy your opponents. Providing reliable and trustworthy information to citizens so that they can make reasoned decisions about their lives is not on this gang's daily to-do list.
SPORTS
By Jack Craig and Jack Craig,The Boston Globe | March 10, 1995
In the face of a threatened lawsuit, the Wall Street Journal yesterday stood behind its story suggesting that the possibility of Reggie Lewis' fatal heart attack being caused by cocaine use was covered up."We remain confident that the article was fair and accurate," managing editor Paul Steiger said after Boston Celtics chairman Paul Gaston announced the team plans to sue the newspaper for $100 million because of the story, written by Ron Suskind.Gaston said Suskind would be included in the suit.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | May 21, 2008
NEW YORK - Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. named Wall Street Journal publisher Robert Thomson as the newspaper's managing editor yesterday, succeeding Marcus Brauchli. Thomson's appointment was approved by a special committee created to oversee the Journal's editorial integrity, New York- based News Corp. said in a statement. Murdoch is remaking The Wall Street Journal, the second- largest U.S. newspaper based on daily circulation, to emphasize more general news and compete with the New York Times.
BUSINESS
By Richard J. Dalton Jr. and Richard J. Dalton Jr.,Newsday | May 2, 2007
Shares of Dow Jones & Co. skyrocketed nearly 55 percent yesterday on news that News Corp. had made an unsolicited offer to buy the publisher of The Wall Street Journal for $60 a share, valuing the deal at about $5 billion. The move would give Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief executive of News Corp., control of the highly respected business newspaper at a time when he also is building a new business television network, significantly adding to his global media empire.
NEWS
By Daniel MachalabaTed Shelsby and Daniel MachalabaTed Shelsby,The Wall Street Journal | December 4, 1990
The port of Baltimore received a big dose of national publicity yesterday -- and it was not very flattering.A front-page story in the Wall Street Journal pointed out the major differences between labor relations and work ethics at the port here, where shipping traffic has declined 21 percent the past decade, and the port at Norfolk Va., which as posted a 130 percent jump in traffic the past ten years.The port of Baltimore has been concerned about its image problems around the world, and has tried to use the recent opening of the $250 million, automated Seagirt terminal to create a more positive view of operations here.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 2000
The Washington Post received three of the 14 Pulitzer Prizes awarded for journalism yesterday, including the public service award for its coverage of the neglect and abuse of the mentally retarded in city group homes in Washington. The Wall Street Journal won two prizes, and the Village Voice, a free weekly newspaper in New York, was awarded the prize for international reporting for its coverage of the AIDS crisis in Africa. The Denver Post staff won the award for breaking news for its coverage of the student massacre at Columbine High School.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
This week the Wall Street Journal's health blog celebrated its five year anniversary. And not with cake. With the Michael Phelps diet. Or, rather, with the memories of it. In a post looking back at its five years in existence, the bloggers recalled some of their biggest hits. Near the top of the list was one about the Baltimore swimmer's famously fattening power meals. "With over 475 comments and counting," the Wall Street Journal writers said, "it's still one of the most trafficked posts 3 ½ years after it was written.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | January 18, 2012
It's one thing to criticize Mitt Romney for being a businessman with the wrong values. It's quite another to accuse him and his former company, Bain Capital, of doing bad things. If what Bain Capital did under Mr. Romney was bad for America, the burden shifts to Mr. Romney's critics to propose laws that would prevent Bain and other companies from doing such bad things in the future. Don't hold your breath. Newt Gingrich says Bain under Mr. Romney carried out "clever legal ways to loot a company.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | December 13, 2011
The Institute for Policy Studies has published its list of the 10 greediest Americans for 2011. "Unfortunately, it was very easy to choose 10," says Sam Pizzigati, editor of the think tank's “Too Much” weekly newsletter. "That's the problem with our economy at the current time. " Pizzigati says he could have made things easy by just choosing the top 10 players in the hedge fund industry. But, he adds, "We try to give a little flavor of the variety of the greed.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
Letter writer Elizabeth Fixsen commends The Sun for hiring conservative columnist Ron Smith by contrasting it with the difficulty of finding a liberal voice such as Thomas Schaller's in conservative media such as The Washington Times, The Wall Street Journal and Fox News ("A conservative voice on a liberal page," Nov. 26). Evidently she does not listen to Fox News, or she would certainly have heard the liberal views often expressed there by such commentators as Leslie Marshall, Alan Colmes, Juan Williams, Bob Bickel and others who appear on the network.
NEWS
Liz F. Kay | October 19, 2011
The Occupy Baltimore protests , like those around the country, have relied on the rallying cry of "We are the 99 percent. " If you've been curious whether your household income falls, or how close your family is to the 1 percent, the Wall Street Journal is prepared to help you. A "percentage calculator" on the Wall Street Journal's site will tell you where your income stacks up. I discovered it via a blog post on The Atlantic website...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
If you want to get a sense of how desperate things have become in Rupert Murdoch's empire, take a look at this editorial in today's Wall Street Journal. To cast what is happening in the UK -- and what certainly seems headed for the US -- as the work of Murdoch's commercial and ideological enemies might seem mad to reasonable journalists. But not to Murdoch and his chieftans. That is all they seem to know: attack, attack and try to destroy your opponents. Providing reliable and trustworthy information to citizens so that they can make reasoned decisions about their lives is not on this gang's daily to-do list.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 3, 1999
NEWBURGH, Me. -- Here in this tiny town, where they grow their own vegetables, hunt moose, chop firewood and tap maples for syrup, people have no patience for talk about trademark dilution.Bottom line, people here say, a big bully newspaper is picking on a little kids' publication. And they wish the Wall Street Journal would just go away.The Small Street Journal, with its stories, poems, puzzles and contests, was happily into its sixth issue when its founders got a cease-and-desist letter from the Wall Street Journal's parent company.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
Any good editor - and it's widely agreed that Paul E. Steiger is one - would cringe at the phrase "roller coaster ride," especially if it were being used to describe what his newspaper, The Wall Street Journal, has gone through in the past two years. For one thing, it's a cliche. For another, it's inaccurate. Roller coaster rides have some amusing stretches. Roller coaster rides don't leave scars. Roller coasters, as a rule, don't descend into the depths of hell. Again and again since 2001, it has seemed as if that's where Steiger and his staff were.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 24, 2011
I've got another interesting and possibly worthless study for you (I should just make this a daily afternoon feature). The Wall Street Journal examined every offseason move and ranked each MLB team based on "the volume of moves it made and the net quality of the players it ended up with. " The Wall Street Journa l has a bunch of statheads over there -- and there's nothing wrong with that -- so authors Scott Cacciola and Jared Diamond used projected Wins Above Replacement (WAR)
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 23, 2010
The Wall Street Journal reports that baby boomers have not emerged from the fetal position they assumed in 2008, when they found their homes and their retirement funds suddenly to be worth half as much. We boomers stopped spending — we haven't opened our wallets since — and because boomers represent such a huge chunk of the American population, that's bad news for an economy powered by consumer spending. Our plans for retirement were already in trouble because we hadn't saved enough during our working lives, and the stock market collapse made the future that much more troubling.
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