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NEWS
By Matt Vensel | June 13, 2011
You know those amazing videos we see of minor-league managers flipping out and getting ejected from games in emphatic fashion ? We can now add Norfolk Tides manager Gary Allenson to the highlight reel. In Sunday’s 11-5 win over Durham, the manager of the Orioles’ Triple-A affiliate took objection to a home run getting switched to a ground-rule double by the umps. So Allenson sauntered out to the warning track, scaled the outfield wall and started looking for more phantom ground-rule doubles in the shrubbery in center field.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Local playwright Rosemary Frisino Toohey has taken first place for having written the best script to be performed in the recently concluded Baltimore Playwrights Festival. Toohey picked up $250 for her Holocaust-themed drama, "Under the Poplar Trees, the festival announced in a news release. Toohey previously won top honors in the 2005 and 2009 festivals. Second place, carrying a $100 award, went to Lewis Schrager's script for "Fourteen Days in July", while Joycelyn Walls won third place and $50 for "The Soulman's Soul.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
The Orioles announced their plans to renovate Camden Yards for the stadium's 20th anniversary this upcoming season and, as I am sure you all know by now, that includes six bronze statues of the club's current Hall of Famers. I've been lucky enough to visit nearly every Major League Baseball stadium. And Camden Yards, 20 years in, is still one of the best if not the best (I love the parks in San Francisco and Pittsburgh, too). Having the statues - of Frank and Brooks Robinson, Earl Weaver, Jim Palmer, Eddie Murray and Cal Ripken Jr. - will make Camden Yards even cooler.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Burglars who were confronted by a Pasadena resident Monday night fired a shot into a wall before fleeing, Anne Arundel County police said. The resident told police he, his wife and his grandson were asleep in the home in the 1800 block of Poplar Ridge Road when they heard noises inside the house around 11:40 p.m. The man left his bedroom to investigate, yelled that he was armed with a shotgun, and the burglars fired a shot into a wall then ran...
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | September 9, 2003
JERUSALEM - If you want to understand why Israel is building a wall and fence around the West Bank to defend against suicide bombers, just hop on any bus in Jerusalem. You can't wait to get off. You scrutinize every passenger. You look at every backpack. You flinch when another bus pulls alongside. And you can't wait to get off. Yes, Israelis admit it. Suicide bombing of buses and cafes has made them crazy, and the wall-fence they are building is a concrete expression of all those primordial fears.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 22, 2011
Dr. Lester Aubrey Wall Jr., a retired Baltimore internist who during his professional career personified the virtues of the old-fashioned general practitioner, died Tuesday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a daughter's home in The Woodlands, Texas. The longtime Guilford and Towson resident was 94. The son of a banker and homemaker, Dr. Wall was born in Baltimore and raised on Kenwood Avenue. He was a 1933 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in 1937 from St. John's College in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Prestige television has some inherent advantageous over movies: With dozens of hours to tell a story, TV can develop characters with the same depth as novels.  But, now and then, television also can beat movies at their own game: Delivering a blockbuster thrill-ride. Sunday's “Game of Thrones” episode, called “The Watchers on the Wall,” was one of those times. Just as they did for Season 2's best episode “Blackwater,” HBO show-runners brought in Neil Marshall to direct what was essentially an hour-long war movie.
NEWS
October 25, 1992
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
If you live around the BMA, the Walters or the Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower, Kanye West is coming to a wall near you Sunday night. Or, at least his image, words and music are. West has been using public walls the last two weeks to promote the "New Slaves" song from his next release, which is expected to be released in June, according to Rolling Stone . Images of West along with his words and music were projected and broadcast last week...
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
In the early days of the HIV/AIDS crisis, when diagnoses were far more likely to kill than they are today, those in Baltimore who lost their fight with the dreaded disease were memorialized with small tiles mounted in the lobby of Chase Brexton Health Care in Mount Vernon. On Thursday, as Chase Brexton prepares to move to its new offices in the historic Monumental Life Building, about 75 family members and friends of those memorialized in the "Wall of Courage" took a candlelight march to mark the transfer of the memorial.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
City and CSX Transportation maintenance crews did not do a good job responding to repeated complaints from residents about street damage on the Baltimore block that collapsed in the spring, according to the city's transportation director and a report reviewing previous inspections. The city of Baltimore issued the report Sunday analyzing the April 30 collapse of a stretch of East 26th Street after massive rainfall. The report noted that neither CSX nor city maintenance crews who responded to several resident complaints about the roadway before the disaster had the expertise to identify the surface issues as symptomatic of a larger failure of the street's subsurface.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. confirmed Thursday that it has settled a lawsuit brought by residents of an East Baltimore rowhouse partially destroyed in a gas explosion and the family of an 8-year-old boy who was killed in the blast. The family of Troy Douglas, the boy who was killed, and Henry Gaither and Danelle White, who lived in the house in the 400 block of N. Lakewood Ave., sued BGE in May over the explosion. The suit filed by Troy's family alleged that the company had failed to properly maintain its gas lines.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The city of Baltimore and CSX Transportation have agreed to split the cost of rebuilding the one-block retaining wall that collapsed along East 26th Street in Charles Village, ending months of negotiations over who was responsible and how much taxpayers would cover. City officials said Monday they expect the collapse to cost taxpayers about $7.5 million - though the total could increase as construction continues - and CSX would pay the rest. The entire project is now expected to cost about $15 million, down from an initial estimate of $18.5 million.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Osiris Therapeutics cut its quarterly losses in half as it more than doubled sales of its stem cell-based medical treatments used in wound care and sports medicine, but it widely missed Wall Street analysts' expectations. Sales grew to $13.3 million in the quarter ended June 30, up from $5.3 million in the same quarter of 2013. Losses narrowed to $1.9 million from $3.8 million over the same period. When solely considering Osiris' operations, excluding any long-term costs, officials at the Columbia-based company said losses narrowed to $66,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Prestige television has some inherent advantageous over movies: With dozens of hours to tell a story, TV can develop characters with the same depth as novels.  But, now and then, television also can beat movies at their own game: Delivering a blockbuster thrill-ride. Sunday's “Game of Thrones” episode, called “The Watchers on the Wall,” was one of those times. Just as they did for Season 2's best episode “Blackwater,” HBO show-runners brought in Neil Marshall to direct what was essentially an hour-long war movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
For many "American Ninja Warrior" competitors, the warped wall is an insurmountable challenge. But Kacy Catanzaro is not one of those warriors. On Monday's episode of NBC's reality extreme challenge show, Catanzaro, a former Towson University gymnast, became the first female in the show's history to scale the warped wall, moving on to the next round of competition. Catanzaro, who also competed on the show last year, repeatedly jumped up and down in sheer elation after she got to the top of the wall during the qualifying round.  The Towson community was quick to tweet its support.
NEWS
June 1, 2008
On May 25, 2008 MR. WALL passed away. A private service will be held at Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
One week after the collapse of a large retaining wall between CSX Transportation railroad tracks and East 26th Street in Charles Village, city officials said they still had not determined who was responsible for the wall or who will pay the cost to repair it. Officials said they are still poring over decades of documents, including a 1998 agreement between the city and CSX showing that, at least once in the past, they cooperated to repair retaining...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Several steps away from the crumbling edge of East 26th Street in Charles Village, a construction worker slowly unrolled a long yellow measuring tape into a circular hole about the size of a sewer manhole lid. Foot after foot of the tape disappeared as he sought to learn the depth of the hole being bored straight down into the earth by a hulking orange drilling machine anchored not far from St. Paul Street. Another worker at the block-long construction site Tuesday said the hole is the first of many that will be cut into the street as part of a new design to keep East 26th Street and the earth beneath it from spilling down onto the railroad tracks, which run parallel to the street, as they did last week when a century-old retaining wall collapsed amid heavy rain.
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