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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
As the deadline for a possible nationwide jockeys walkout Sunday edges closer, feelings on the issue have intensified at Laurel Park.Yesterday, John E. Mooney, the track's senior vice president and general manager, warned Jimmy Edwards, local representative for the Jockeys' Guild, that the Maryland Jockey Club will institute legal action if necessary if the guild violates antitrust laws by encouraging a job action by the local riders.The guild is not a union and does not have the authority by law to organize a strike.
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EXPLORE
September 15, 2011
The Maryland State Board of Education should step in to resolve the impasse on the county school board before the latter body ceases to function altogether. A certain degree of tension on any elected body is to be expected, even desired. However, the animosity between Allen Dyer and some of his fellow board members has become personal and counterproductive. Last week, the conflict took the board to a new level of dysfunction as chairwoman Janet Siddiqui abruptly suspended its Sept.
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
Sources in the Jockeys Guild said last night that a nationwide walkout on Jan. 1 has become a real possibility and that riders are being alerted to prepare for it."Obviously, they [the track owners] don't want to work with us in good faith and there certainly appears that there is going to be a walkout," said Jimmy Edwards, local manager for the guild at the Middle Atlantic tracks. "I've never seen the riders more unified."Yesterday, track owners rejected the jockeys' two latest proposals and said that when their current three-year contract with the riders is up Dec. 31, they no longer will feel any responsibility to pay the jockeys for their media rights.
NEWS
June 25, 2011
Anyone who has ever participated in contract negotiations of any kind has seen it all before. One side declares an impasse, leaves in a huff and accuses the other of being stubborn and unreasonable. Those left behind in negotiations point their fingers in the opposite direction. That's why it would be foolish to read too much in the abrupt end of debt ceiling talks on Thursday. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor walked away because Democrats want to include taxes in the potential $2 trillion package.
BUSINESS
By Blair Walker | July 9, 1991
Talks yesterday between General Motors Corp. and striking workers at its Baltimore minivan assembly plant brought the two sides no closer to ending a three-week walkout, negotiators said."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2001
Hospital service workers, who staged two one-day walkouts earlier this year, plan a three-day strike for April 19 to 21 at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Sinai Hospital, union leaders said yesterday. "Some workers wanted to do more" than another one-day strike in an attempt to advance bargaining toward a contract, said Robert Moore, president of District 1199E- DC of the Service Employees International Union. The workers also will distribute leaflets at Johns Hopkins homecoming that weekend to acquaint alumni with the issues, Moore said.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Franklin and Rick Popely | October 12, 2007
CHICAGO -- With its two short walkouts, the United Auto Workers union used a strategy that has almost become a relic for organized labor, the strike. Before the UAW's two-day strike last month at General Motors Corp. and its roughly six hour walkout Wednesday at Chrysler LLC, the union hadn't launched a nationwide strike against a major automaker in 31 years. There are fewer than two dozen major walkouts each year, down from 400 or more annually in the 1950s, which raises the question of whether the UAW's quick settlements with the two automakers on the heels of strikes will pump new life into an old tactic or whether U.S. unions remain gun-shy about the tactic, which has often backfired?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - Amtrak unions renewed a threat yesterday to stage a one-day walkout to protest the rail system's tenuous financial health, after a federal judge rejected management's request to block the strike. But Charles Moneypenny, director of the Transport Workers Union's railroad division, said the unions "almost certainly" would not strike during the holiday season. "The unions need to get together and decide what our next step will be, including the possibility of a one-day walkout," he said.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
Service workers walked off their jobs and onto picket lines yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Sinai Hospital. The one-day walkout - the strikers were scheduled to return to work this morning - was called by a local of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) in a bid for new contracts at the three institutions. The union represents patient-care aides and housekeeping, dietary and maintenance employees. "During this economic boom, those workers lost ground," said Robert Moore, president of the local, SEIU District 1199E-DC.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 1999
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- As Marvin Lowrie, a 52-year-old machinist, walked the picket line outside the giant shipyard here, there was pride laced with bitterness when he talked -- pride that his shipyard produces the world's most sophisticated nuclear aircraft carriers.But Lowrie, who constructs intricate piping systems for the carriers, voiced unmistakable bitterness that after 27 years on the job making ships essential to the nation's defense, he was still earning less than $30,000 a year.Seething about what they called stingy wages and pensions, Lowrie and more than 8,000 other workers at Newport News Shipbuilding went on strike after their contract expired Monday in one of the largest walkouts this decade.
NEWS
August 31, 2008
The troubles at the University of Maryland Medical System started long before one-third of the board, including its chairman, resigned a week and a half ago. And it predates the dispute over how to replace outgoing Chief Executive Officer Edmond F. Notebaert, who announced his retirement in July. Tensions at the medical system have been building for years, and critics who now lambaste Gov. Martin O'Malley for intervening in the matter have it exactly wrong. The problem is not that the governor took recent action but that he did not step in much earlier when it was clear that UMMS leadership had become dysfunctional.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
As reported Feb. 25, 1990, in The Howard Sun: The county school board walked out on Howard County teachers twice Thursday, refusing to listen as the teachers union leader attempted to present their views on deadlocked contract talks and non-teaching duties. The first walkout came during the afternoon session of Thursday's board meeting, the second during the evening one. James R. Swab, president of the Howard County Education Association, tried during the afternoon meeting to talk about board attempts to remove contract language that gives teachers seniority rights in transfers and layoffs.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2007
There will be no Top-10 lists, no behind-the-scenes peeks into Jay's Garage, no Mess O' Potamia (or anything else), no eerie forecasts of what life will be like in the year 2000. In fact, there likely will be no original late-night programming at all for the near future, at least not until show-business writers agree to end their strike and go back to work. The Late Show with David Letterman's lists will be blank, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno's garage will be padlocked. The Daily Show's reports on Iraq will go mute, and the crystal balls at Late Night with Conan O'Brien will reveal nothing.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Franklin and Rick Popely | October 12, 2007
CHICAGO -- With its two short walkouts, the United Auto Workers union used a strategy that has almost become a relic for organized labor, the strike. Before the UAW's two-day strike last month at General Motors Corp. and its roughly six hour walkout Wednesday at Chrysler LLC, the union hadn't launched a nationwide strike against a major automaker in 31 years. There are fewer than two dozen major walkouts each year, down from 400 or more annually in the 1950s, which raises the question of whether the UAW's quick settlements with the two automakers on the heels of strikes will pump new life into an old tactic or whether U.S. unions remain gun-shy about the tactic, which has often backfired?
BUSINESS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | August 22, 2006
DETROIT -- The flight attendants union at Northwest Airlines Inc. plans to notify travelers by e-mail before it stages surprise walkouts, which are possible as early as its strike deadline Friday night. But don't expect much notice. The Association of Flight Attendants has asked travelers to sign up on its Web site, www.nwaafa.org, to receive e-mail alerts about walkouts. The notice could be as much as a couple of hours if the union plans a full-scale walkout or as short as 20 minutes - after passengers are at the airport - if the union plans to strike one flight, AFA spokesman Ricky Thornton said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Michael Oneal | September 27, 2005
CHICAGO - Management finally blinked in the 24-day game of chicken between Boeing Co. and its biggest union. Faced with escalating costs and the potential for damaged customer relationships, Boeing and the Machinists union tentatively agreed Friday to end a strike that idled more than 18,000 workers and shut down commercial airplane production for almost a month. The deal, which is subject to a union ratification vote Thursday, gives the Machinists what they wanted most - better pension benefits, no increase in out-of-pocket health care costs and more rights for senior workers.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2001
Seeking higher wages and a better chance to expand union coverage, nearly 2,500 service workers are scheduled to stage a one-day walkout tomorrow at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Sinai Hospital. Officials of all three hospitals said they expect to be able to operate normally, using supervisors and volunteers. The union represents dietary, housekeeping, maintenance and clerical workers, along with technicians and patient-care aides. The walkout is scheduled to begin at 6 a.m. "It should be business as usual," said Jill Bloom, a spokeswoman for Sinai.
BUSINESS
By Susan Diesenhouse and Susan Diesenhouse,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 3, 2005
CHICAGO - The Boeing Co., flooded with orders for its 787 Dreamliner commercial jet, suddenly faces a potentially crippling work stoppage. Just after midnight Thursday, the 18,500 machinists who make parts and assemble planes for Boeing went on strike, halting operations at one of the world's largest makers of commercial planes. The strike comes at a particularly inopportune time for Boeing, which is locked in a battle for market share dominance with Airbus SAS, its European archrival.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2005
Republican lawmakers say they won't participate in hearings on Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s personnel practices if the inquiry becomes overly partisan, and they are threatening to walk out of the proceedings if majority Democrats don't play fair. "If it's extremely egregious and partisan, and Republicans aren't given the opportunity to participate in it, then we won't be there," Sen. J. Lowell Stoltzfus, the minority leader from Somerset County, said yesterday. The warning comes as a 12-member committee is scheduled to launch its investigation Monday into Ehrlich's hiring and firing decisions.
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