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Walking Distance

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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
Whenever Tia Arnold wants a night on the town - to grab a bite to eat, say, or catch a film - she just has to step out her front door and stroll across the parking lot to The Mall in Columbia. The spacious brick townhouse she shares with her parents is just one house back from the busy two-lane "ring road" around the shopping center. "It's great because I can walk to the movies really quick," says Arnold, 33, who spends much of her week on the road training cosmetics salespeople. Time was, only in cities and towns could people live within walking distance of shops, restaurants and nightlife.
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NEWS
February 10, 2014
I have lived in the Canton area for 55 years and have been a city resident for 63 years. My husband and I raised two daughters here, who in their adult lives decided to buy homes in the Canton area. We are all within walking distance of each other. However, our youngest daughter, who has two young children, recently decided that Baltimore City - and Canton in particular - are no longer safe places to raise her children. As her parents, this saddens us. We never thought it would come to this.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1999
Most Marylanders are familiar with the Camden Yards sports complex, historic Camden train station, and the Camden Club restaurant.Soon they'll be hearing about Camden Crossing, an $18 million community that will put 144 townhouses within walking distance of Baltimore's downtown stadiums.The city of Baltimore selected MetroVentures/USA of Columbia last year to develop Camden Crossing on the former Koppers Co. property, an 8-acre parcel near the B & O Railroad Museum.MetroVentures has since refined its designs and will launch its marketing campaign this month when it takes part in the city's Homebuying Fair and Trolley Tour of southwest Baltimore neighborhoods.
NEWS
September 20, 2008
Liquor store failed to secure safety In Peter Hermann's Baltimore Crime Beat column "Shopowner's lawsuit may test the city's padlock law" (Sept. 12), Chang K. Yim, the owner of Linden Bar and Liquors, portrays himself as a victim because his store was ordered padlocked as a result of the persistent problem of drug dealing and violence in and around the store. Any action that damages someone's livelihood has to be taken very seriously, and must be undertaken only as a last resort to end a problem that is hurting many others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | May 15, 2008
George's, situated in the gorgeous Peabody Court Hotel, has one of Baltimore's best addresses, in Mount Vernon Square and within walking distance of the city's best-known cultural attractions. The historic hotel does justice to the location, practically purring with old-world charm, from its wood floors to its royal-purple walls and the stunning chandelier in the lobby. "Quiet elegance" are the key words of the hotel and its restaurant. The restaurant staff is attentive, but practically tiptoes across the floors, and leans in to take your order, speaking in close to a whisper in an apparent attempt to keep the room's ambient noise level as low as possible.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | December 2, 2005
Vandals spray-painted at least 10 homes or vehicles with swastikas in an Elkridge neighborhood Wednesday night or yesterday morning, Howard County police said yesterday. Police are calling the graffiti "hate-bias incidents" rather than "hate crimes" because no one was targeted. "There are no similarities between any of the victims," said police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn. "The victims were not of one race or faith." All the incidents occurred in the 6100 blocks of Ducketts Lane, Kyle Leaf Court, Lori Lane and Kara's Walk, which are within walking distance of each other.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
I have lived in the Canton area for 55 years and have been a city resident for 63 years. My husband and I raised two daughters here, who in their adult lives decided to buy homes in the Canton area. We are all within walking distance of each other. However, our youngest daughter, who has two young children, recently decided that Baltimore City - and Canton in particular - are no longer safe places to raise her children. As her parents, this saddens us. We never thought it would come to this.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | October 20, 1993
They came, they saw, and they might even come back.New Windsor Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. said the 10 young residents who gathered Saturday night for the first installment of the town's "Saturday Night Movie" represent the promise of the program."
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | December 18, 1991
What is Christmas all about, anyway? Is it the hustle and bustle of last-minute shopping? Is it buying -- and receiving -- presents? Or could it be remembering that one special thing that made the holiday seem wonderful to you. Each day from now until Dec. 25 we'll pass on some tips or thoughts about the holiday season.I guess it's like when you stop believing in Santa Claus.Just this past weekend, it dawned on me: not that there wasn't a Santa Claus (I'd figured that out a good two, three years ago)
NEWS
By Norris West | January 26, 1997
THE DISTANCE between Philadelphia and Howard County is NTC more than the 100 miles of Interstate 95 that separate my hometown from my home.A reminder of this comes every time I use a Howard Area Transit System (HATS) bus to commute between Ellicott City and Columbia. The suburban bus system is light years from the big-city network of trains, light rail and buses that was my link to the outside world.For their myriad of urban woes, Philadelphians are spoiled when it comes to mass transit. When commuters miss a trolley, they don't worry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | May 15, 2008
George's, situated in the gorgeous Peabody Court Hotel, has one of Baltimore's best addresses, in Mount Vernon Square and within walking distance of the city's best-known cultural attractions. The historic hotel does justice to the location, practically purring with old-world charm, from its wood floors to its royal-purple walls and the stunning chandelier in the lobby. "Quiet elegance" are the key words of the hotel and its restaurant. The restaurant staff is attentive, but practically tiptoes across the floors, and leans in to take your order, speaking in close to a whisper in an apparent attempt to keep the room's ambient noise level as low as possible.
BUSINESS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to the Sun | November 25, 2007
Black Friday is over, but the holiday shopping season has just begun. For many people that means lots of car trips to the mall and the inevitable traffic hassles. But for Shalonda Long, it's all a walk in the park -- the parking lot, that is. As one of the residents of Greenwich Place at Town Center, a luxury townhouse and apartment complex in Owings Mills, Long lives just a stone's throw from the sprawling Owings Mills Mall. "The mall is so close, you can walk there in about five minutes," said Long, 31, who also manages the luxury property, which opened last fall.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | December 2, 2005
Vandals spray-painted at least 10 homes or vehicles with swastikas in an Elkridge neighborhood Wednesday night or yesterday morning, Howard County police said yesterday. Police are calling the graffiti "hate-bias incidents" rather than "hate crimes" because no one was targeted. "There are no similarities between any of the victims," said police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn. "The victims were not of one race or faith." All the incidents occurred in the 6100 blocks of Ducketts Lane, Kyle Leaf Court, Lori Lane and Kara's Walk, which are within walking distance of each other.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
Carroll County's first regional planning conference will open Saturday with presentations from two renowned land-use experts and continue with discussions on how the county should grow during the next decades. The daylong event has drawn about 150 county and town officials but still needs residents to participate. "We want the public," said Neil Ridgely, county zoning administrator. "They need to buy into this as we go into the master-plan process." Carroll officials expect to undertake a comprehensive reworking of the master plan for growth this fall, an effort that should involve everyone, said Frank Johnson, the county's director of legislative services and liaison to the Council of Governments, which organized the conference.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Baltimore officials announced plans yesterday for a pricey and posh apartment tower just a block from the Inner Harbor that they say will boost the city's efforts to transform downtown into a place where people not only work, but live. A $71 million development called Cityscape - with 300 luxury apartments, retail and a 542-space parking garage - beat out two hotel-oriented projects to win a prime city-owned parcel at the northwest corner of Calvert and Lombard streets. Baltimore Development Corp.
BUSINESS
By Will Morton and Will Morton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 2004
Karen French lives the ultimate city life: She walks eight minutes to work, owns a single-family home across from a park and lives a few blocks away from cultural institutions. And she is steps away from downtown in relatively unknown Seton Hill. "We're right in the heart of it," said French, 41, a painting restorer at the Walters Art Museum. On the downside, there's no back yard at the house she shares with her two small children and husband, a puppeteer who runs a theater in Southwest Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Daphne Swancutt and Daphne Swancutt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2001
It's nearly too good to be true. Some people might even say the talk is downright sappy. That's because Thornleigh residents themselves admit they are a sentimental bunch. And they unabashedly gush that their neighborhood is just about as close to perfection as you can get. "It's a feeling you get when driving through," said 10-year resident Kim Dockman, president of the Thornleigh Improvement Association. But if the feeling is difficult to describe, folks who live in Thornleigh are quite clear about the more tangible reasons that attract them to the 44-year-old neighborhood just minutes off the Jones Falls Expressway in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | July 26, 1991
A light-rail station anywhere near Baltimore-Washington International Airport would be an improvement for many workers using public transportation to commute from the city, local businessmen say."We welcome the light rail," said Sylvia Taylor, personnel director for Guest Quarters BWI hotel. "We have about 30 employees who use public transportation to get to work."Employees often purchase a monthly bus pass, for which Guest Quarters picks up half of the $37.50 cost, Taylor said. But employees still have to catch a shuttle bus from the Mass Transit Administration stop to the hotel.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
Whenever Tia Arnold wants a night on the town - to grab a bite to eat, say, or catch a film - she just has to step out her front door and stroll across the parking lot to The Mall in Columbia. The spacious brick townhouse she shares with her parents is just one house back from the busy two-lane "ring road" around the shopping center. "It's great because I can walk to the movies really quick," says Arnold, 33, who spends much of her week on the road training cosmetics salespeople. Time was, only in cities and towns could people live within walking distance of shops, restaurants and nightlife.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
For 30 years, Winston Tabb traveled from his home in suburban Reston, Va., to his job at the Library of Congress on Washington's Capitol Hill - a 60-mile round trip that took him "two hours at least, on a good day." So when he took a position two years ago as director of libraries at the Johns Hopkins University, he vowed to find a home within walking distance of the school's Homewood campus. Now, his commute is a 10- to 15-minute stroll from his Guilford home. "I like the freedom of it. I like the exercise.
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