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SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | May 12, 1996
MILWAUKEE -- Let's see Fox liven this up.The younger generation might want offense, but a game with more than twice as many walks as hits is simply offensive.This is the side of the story Ken Burns refused to tell -- and the side Little League mothers know all too well.Forget the pastoral wonder of the sport, the timeless majesty of nine innings, the green fields of the mind.Burns should have been at County Stadium yesterday, interviewing the shivering masses who watched their beloved Brew Crew issue eight walks in the last three innings.
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EXPLORE
August 2, 2011
Churchville resident Cyndi Olivacz, 37, had a perfectly normal pregnancy with her now 3-year-old son, David. She and her husband, Joe Olivacz, 38, and a chiropractor in Bel Air and Havre de Grace, weren't expecting anything unusual. But when David was born almost four years ago "he was very lethargic. He didn't cry. He was basically asleep when he was born," Olivacz, a physical therapist in Havre de Grace, remembers. Doctors tested David's blood and a week later was diagnosed with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS)
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1996
In a city of ethnic festivals, where thousands salute Baltimore's culinary feats, the Herring Run Walkathon and Festival is an odd duck.It celebrates not cannoli or kielbasa, but clean water.The second festival, scheduled for tomorrow at Herring Run Park in Northeast Baltimore, promotes rejuvenation of the Herring Run watershed and the Chesapeake Bay, where it empties.The festival includes a walkathon along the stream, children's games, a poster and photo contest, an environmental puppet show and displays by community and environmental groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
There will be plenty of treats, costumes, contests and free heart exams. And that's just for the pets. More than 5,000 people and their pets are expected to gather Sunday at Druid Hill Park for the 16th annual March for the Animals . The event, which starts with a 1.5-mile walk-a-thon and culminates with a festival, is the largest fundraiser for the Maryland SPCA. Last year's festivities raised $364,000. All money goes directly to fund animals housed in the adoption center, pet ownership education and care for homeless animals.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2003
A three-mile walkathon is planned tomorrow morning at the University of Maryland, College Park to raise money to help find a cure for a debilitating muscular disease that afflicts Dick Edell, the school's former men's lacrosse coach. Edell, a beloved figure on the national lacrosse scene, suffers from inclusion body myositis, which slowly destroys muscle fiber and tissue and incapacitates a person's arms and legs. He and organizers hope that the event, called "Muscling Out Myositis," will draw 500 Maryland alumni, friends and supporters, and raise $20,000 for the cause.
NEWS
March 29, 1991
The March of Dimes will sponsor the Annapolis Walkathon on Sunday, April 14.The walk, an annual fund-raiser to help fight birth defects, will begin at 8 a.m. at Navy-Marine Corps Stadium. The 15-mile route follows Annapolis streets to Quiet Waters Park before returning through the Naval Academy and back to the stadium.Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins and County Executive Robert R. Neall will serve as honorary co-chairmen for the 1991 walk. Filling in for Chairman Richard Goodwin of Annapolis, who is still serving inthe Persian Gulf, is Tom Roskelly of the Annapolis Office of Public Information and Tourism.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | June 3, 2007
In several groups of about 100 each, students at Southampton Middle School filed out to the field beside the school. Dressed in tank tops, T-shirts and shorts, the students did warm-up exercises before walking around the designated course. Despite temperatures pushing 90 and high humidity, Jay Delgado bounded around the field. "This is a good activity, because it gives me a chance to come out here and run," said the 13-year-old seventh-grader. "It's also good because we are raising money to help kids go to college."
NEWS
April 25, 2008
NAMI walkathon is set for May 3 The 2008 Maryland NAMIWalks For the Mind of America walkathon will be held at 11 a.m. May 3 at Centennial Park in Ellicott City. Registration begins at 10 a.m. There is no fee to participate, but walkers are encouraged to collect donations from family members, friends, co-workers and business associates. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) offers support, education, research and advocacy programs for the mentally ill in Maryland. Information: 410-772-9300 or visit www.nami.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 2003
WHEN Shayna Meliker and Carrie Gartner learned that their Hebrew teacher suffered from Crohn's disease, they decided to organize a walkathon to help find a cure. Shayna and Carrie, both eighth-graders at Burleigh Manor Middle School, have known teacher Chaya Solomon of Baltimore for about two years. Last May, they learned from another teacher at Beth Shalom in Columbia that Solomon was in the hospital, fighting a flare-up of Crohn's disease. "We were a little freaked out" because we didn't know anything about it, Shayna recalled.
NEWS
By Richard Pretorius | February 7, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Winter's chill claims the lives of three homeless people who did not find shelter for a night. The story makes the front page and leads to the usual calls from officials to do more to prevent such tragedies. That same night, huddled in the shadows of the subway and in the parks, dozens of homeless try to survive another night. To them, even when given a place to go, coming in from the cold does not seem to be such a good option. The shelters are dirty and dangerous and run by drug dealers, they say. From Washington, D.C., to Seattle, from Miami to Augusta, Maine, and in Baltimore, the homeless are everywhere.
NEWS
April 27, 2008
The 2008 Maryland NAMIWalks for the Mind of America walkathon will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Centennial Park in Ellicott City. Registration begins at 10 a.m. Family activities are also planned. There is no fee to participate, but walkers are encouraged to collect donations. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) offers support, education, research and advocacy programs for the mentally ill in Maryland. About 70 NAMI walks are expected to be held around the country. Information: 410-772-9300 or visit www.nami.
NEWS
April 25, 2008
NAMI walkathon is set for May 3 The 2008 Maryland NAMIWalks For the Mind of America walkathon will be held at 11 a.m. May 3 at Centennial Park in Ellicott City. Registration begins at 10 a.m. There is no fee to participate, but walkers are encouraged to collect donations from family members, friends, co-workers and business associates. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) offers support, education, research and advocacy programs for the mentally ill in Maryland. Information: 410-772-9300 or visit www.nami.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | June 3, 2007
In several groups of about 100 each, students at Southampton Middle School filed out to the field beside the school. Dressed in tank tops, T-shirts and shorts, the students did warm-up exercises before walking around the designated course. Despite temperatures pushing 90 and high humidity, Jay Delgado bounded around the field. "This is a good activity, because it gives me a chance to come out here and run," said the 13-year-old seventh-grader. "It's also good because we are raising money to help kids go to college."
NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
As Megan Blair jogged with other fourth-graders on a path at Manchester Elementary School, she proudly wore a sticker that read, "Helping to score a diabetes cure for Jack." Megan, 9, said she chose to run the one-mile run/walk in honor of Jack, her 5-year-old brother who has Type I diabetes. Meanwhile, other Manchester pupils donned stickers that bore Megan's name because she, too, has the disease. They also ran in honor of other classmates, teachers and relatives with the disease. The event was part of the school's annual effort to raise funds for the American Diabetes Association as well as awareness about the disease.
NEWS
By Mary C. Schneidau and Mary C. Schneidau,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2004
The track at Arundel High School in Annapolis will be filled Friday night not with high school athletes, but with about 500 people of all ages who are gathering to fight cancer and honor those who live with the disease. Members of about 45 teams will take turns circling the track continuously from Friday evening to early Saturday as part of the Anne Arundel County Relay for Life, an event that raises money for the American Cancer Society. Organizers are hoping to raise $170,000 this weekend, adding to the $315,000 raised from relays in the area during the past several weeks, said Sylvia Burch, an American Cancer Society staff member helping to coordinate the event.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2003
A three-mile walkathon is planned tomorrow morning at the University of Maryland, College Park to raise money to help find a cure for a debilitating muscular disease that afflicts Dick Edell, the school's former men's lacrosse coach. Edell, a beloved figure on the national lacrosse scene, suffers from inclusion body myositis, which slowly destroys muscle fiber and tissue and incapacitates a person's arms and legs. He and organizers hope that the event, called "Muscling Out Myositis," will draw 500 Maryland alumni, friends and supporters, and raise $20,000 for the cause.
NEWS
May 19, 1991
From: Richard P. Streett Jr., VMDChairmanAnimal Walk-A-ThonChurchvilleThe Harford Veterinary Medical Association, WXCY-FM and United Cerebral Palsy would like to thankeveryone who participated in our first annual Animal Walk-A-Thon forUCP on Sunday, April 21, at the Equestrian Center.Despite the weather, the event was a success and we look forward to having it againnext year.We would like to especially thank the following for their time and generosity -- Harford County Equestrian Center, Whiteford Port-A-Pot, 4 Footed Friends Shoppe, Tharpe and Green Mill, Prospect Mill, Bel Air Farm Supply, Churchville Saddlery, Southern States Bel Air, CIBA-GEIGY Animal Health, U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency, Harford County Animal Control, Harford County Sheriff's Department, and Harford County Council members Joanne Parrott, Theresa Pierno and Robert Wagner.
NEWS
April 27, 2008
The 2008 Maryland NAMIWalks for the Mind of America walkathon will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Centennial Park in Ellicott City. Registration begins at 10 a.m. Family activities are also planned. There is no fee to participate, but walkers are encouraged to collect donations. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) offers support, education, research and advocacy programs for the mentally ill in Maryland. About 70 NAMI walks are expected to be held around the country. Information: 410-772-9300 or visit www.nami.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
Who would have imagined that they would end up in the same story. For most of their lives, Ginny Schardt and Jessica Cowling were strangers, different women in many ways. Ginny had a husband and children, Jessica was unmarried; in age they were more than a decade apart. But from the night they met in a cancer support group, the two women were united by a bond as powerful as it was unfair. They were both too young to be dying of metastatic breast cancer, and they were both determined not to let the disease define their lives.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 2003
WHEN Shayna Meliker and Carrie Gartner learned that their Hebrew teacher suffered from Crohn's disease, they decided to organize a walkathon to help find a cure. Shayna and Carrie, both eighth-graders at Burleigh Manor Middle School, have known teacher Chaya Solomon of Baltimore for about two years. Last May, they learned from another teacher at Beth Shalom in Columbia that Solomon was in the hospital, fighting a flare-up of Crohn's disease. "We were a little freaked out" because we didn't know anything about it, Shayna recalled.
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