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June 10, 2011
Charles Brown Chelsea Connor Jason Davis Amelia Downs-Flickinger Kevin Dunn Charlotte Jones Leo Kern Mustafa Matumla Chelsea Moss Paul Newill-Schamp John Richardson
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Carol Kinne, who channeled her idealism and her passion for diversity into programs that championed community service and cultural understanding among students at Park School, died of cancer at her home in Baltimore on March 9. The Mount Washington resident had just turned 65. A former teacher and librarian whose career at Park totaled 36 years, Mrs. Kinne served most recently as coordinator of service days for students. She also directed a mentorship program that partnered older students with children in Park's lower school and co-founded an annual student bus trip to landmarks of the civil rights movement in the South.
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NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1997
When you have a building with natural lighting to spare, imaginative wall coverings, nonquadrangular rooms and decent restrooms, it's usually not a school that you're describing.All of those things are part of the Waldorf School of Baltimore's newest building in Coldspring New Town, introduced to the public yesterday during a dedication in front of the school's front doors.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Nancy S. Grasmick, Maryland's superintendent of schools, were among the speakers who celebrated the building, which opened Sept.
EXPLORE
June 10, 2011
Charles Brown Chelsea Connor Jason Davis Amelia Downs-Flickinger Kevin Dunn Charlotte Jones Leo Kern Mustafa Matumla Chelsea Moss Paul Newill-Schamp John Richardson
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 18, 1998
The little red schoolhouse, this isn't.From the moment visitors approach Baltimore's newest private school building, with its irregular roofline, undulating walls and nonrectilinear windows, they can sense something unusual is going on inside.Once through the front door, they'll discover the classrooms come in many different shapes and sizes. Walls are glazed with multiple coats of paint, in colors selected either to "warm up" students or "cool them down." Halls are veritable galleries of student artwork.
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2004
Inside the violet-colored walls of the music room at the Waldorf School of Baltimore, 25 folding chairs are arranged in an open circle facing a movable chalkboard, piles of sheet music cover a corner desk, a crate containing a jumble of tenor and alto recorders sits on a table behind an upright piano -- and Joanne Karp is crying. For the last 18 years of a teaching career spanning half a century, Karp, 73, has used that piano to teach music to first- through eighth-graders at the school.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2000
THEY CALL IT THE Children's Garden. It's a place where you can pause and catch your breath in the great race to teach reading at earlier -- ever earlier -- ages. The Children's Garden at Baltimore's Waldorf School is so much different from the emerging model of public school kindergarten that you think you're in another world. Kindergarten these days is a colorful hothouse. The Children's Garden is cool. Start with the subdued lighting, the soft brown walls uncluttered by posters and "word walls."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
IT WILL BE AN emotional parting tomorrow, when Waldorf School's eighth-graders graduate and leave behind their teacher seven years, Carol Steil.Steil, 54, has grown up with these kids. She became their teacher in 1992, when they were still losing baby teeth. She was their teacher in '96 and '97, when puberty rushed in with horns blaring. Now they're young men and women, and Steil is still their teacher -- at least until tomorrow.Known as "looping," the idea of one teacher sticking with a group of kids for more than a year is as old as the one-room schoolhouse.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
The Waldorf School of Baltimore will be a nomad no more.After 25 years of holding classes in borrowed buildings, the growing independent school in Coldspring New Town is about to build its own home.A home for not only eight classrooms, but also the art, music, handwork and movement classes that are an integral part of Waldorf education.At Waldorf schools -- there are more than 100 in North America -- students learn to knit before they learn to read and paint before they print. Students, ideally, stay with the same teacher from first through eighth grade.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
On June 3, 2006, DONALD KENNETH STEIL; beloved husband of Carol Kruse Steil; loving father of Sigrid Steil; devoted son of Geneva Steil and the late Kenneth Steil; dear brother of Jack Steil. Also survived by five nieces and one nephew. A Memorial Service will be held Sunday, June 18, 3pm at The Waldorf School of Baltimore, 4801 Tamarind Road, Baltimore, MD 21209.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
On June 3, 2006, DONALD KENNETH STEIL; beloved husband of Carol Kruse Steil; loving father of Sigrid Steil; devoted son of Geneva Steil and the late Kenneth Steil; dear brother of Jack Steil. Also survived by five nieces and one nephew. A Memorial Service will be held Sunday, June 18, 3pm at The Waldorf School of Baltimore, 4801 Tamarind Road, Baltimore, MD 21209.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
Katherine Charles, a former teacher at the Waldorf School in Baltimore who was active in the local folk music and dance community, died Nov. 6 of early-onset Alzheimer's disease at the Ruxton Health and Rehabilitation Center in Pikesville. The Waverly resident was 55. Born and raised in Roslyn Heights, N.Y., Miss Charles was known to her friends as Kate. She graduated from the Waldorf School of Garden City, N.Y., in 1968, then earned a bachelor's degree from Beloit College in Beloit, Wis., and a master's degree from Adelphi University in Garden City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
Every year it begins with a knock on the door, followed by a long moment of anticipation. When the teacher finally nods, the children enter a familiar room transformed by darkness. With the windows covered, the only light in the movement arts studio flickers from a few candles. One by one, the students file past a freshly constructed winter garden, a spiraling path of greenery that leads to a place of light guarded by a quiet angel from the eighth grade -- another piece of magic. Along the way, the children hear the tinkling voices of glockenspiels, sounds that summon old melodies and simpler times.
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2004
Inside the violet-colored walls of the music room at the Waldorf School of Baltimore, 25 folding chairs are arranged in an open circle facing a movable chalkboard, piles of sheet music cover a corner desk, a crate containing a jumble of tenor and alto recorders sits on a table behind an upright piano -- and Joanne Karp is crying. For the last 18 years of a teaching career spanning half a century, Karp, 73, has used that piano to teach music to first- through eighth-graders at the school.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
In between all the fun - making sun prints of leaves, digging in the soil and searching for earthworms - there was learning going on. The second-graders at the Waldorf School in North Baltimore were learning about science and the environment. And their teachers - eighth-graders with special needs at nearby Dr. Roland N. Patterson Senior Academy - were learning how to be leaders. "I love working with the kids with stuff," said Leviticus Wilburn, 14, at the schools' last hands-on activity Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | November 2, 2000
Astronomy Open House Reach to the stars, or at least get close, Saturday at an observing session on the Harford Community College campus. Stargaze through large telescopes and binoculars and ask questions of members of the Harford County Astronomical Society, which co-sponsors the event along with the college. View the first-quarter moon, Mars and other fascinations of the night sky. The session takes place on the open grassy area adjacent to Joppa Hall. If cloudy or raining, the event will be rescheduled for Dec. 2. The Astronomy Open House takes place from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday near Joppa Hall, HCC campus, 401 Thomas Run Road, Bel Air. Free.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | November 2, 2000
Astronomy Open House Reach to the stars, or at least get close, Saturday at an observing session on the Harford Community College campus. Stargaze through large telescopes and binoculars and ask questions of members of the Harford County Astronomical Society, which co-sponsors the event along with the college. View the first-quarter moon, Mars and other fascinations of the night sky. The session takes place on the open grassy area adjacent to Joppa Hall. If cloudy or raining, the event will be rescheduled for Dec. 2. The Astronomy Open House takes place from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday near Joppa Hall, HCC campus, 401 Thomas Run Road, Bel Air. Free.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
Katherine Charles, a former teacher at the Waldorf School in Baltimore who was active in the local folk music and dance community, died Nov. 6 of early-onset Alzheimer's disease at the Ruxton Health and Rehabilitation Center in Pikesville. The Waverly resident was 55. Born and raised in Roslyn Heights, N.Y., Miss Charles was known to her friends as Kate. She graduated from the Waldorf School of Garden City, N.Y., in 1968, then earned a bachelor's degree from Beloit College in Beloit, Wis., and a master's degree from Adelphi University in Garden City.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
SCHOOLS THAT ARE small, rural and have a low percentage of minority students are more likely to be technologically sophisticated, according to a report from one of the nation's leading education research companies. In other words, the "digital divide" is for real. The research firm, Market Data Retrieval, developed a Tech Sophistication Index (TSI) and used it to measure the technological development of public, private and parochial schools nationwide. Maryland is among the 10 states with the nation's lowest TSI scores, with Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, California, Arizona, Pennsylvania and Connecticut.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2000
THEY CALL IT THE Children's Garden. It's a place where you can pause and catch your breath in the great race to teach reading at earlier -- ever earlier -- ages. The Children's Garden at Baltimore's Waldorf School is so much different from the emerging model of public school kindergarten that you think you're in another world. Kindergarten these days is a colorful hothouse. The Children's Garden is cool. Start with the subdued lighting, the soft brown walls uncluttered by posters and "word walls."
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