Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWalden Pond
IN THE NEWS

Walden Pond

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 10, 1992
Getting a Don Henley tour on the road is a fairly complex operation, involving musicians, technicians, support staff and a small caravan of buses and trucks. There was none of that when the rock star rolled into Baltimore Friday evening, however -- just Henley, a woman friend, and a single road manager/bodyguard, all crammed into a rented Lincoln. No drum kit, no amplifiers, no stage lights, no busily scurrying roadies.There were plenty of fans, though. In fact, several hundred spent the better part of an hour lining up outside the Gordon's Booksellers shop in the Rotunda, eagerly waiting to meet Henley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | July 13, 2002
CROFTON - It's quiet out here. Too quiet. At 7 in the morning, a light mist still covers the most famous pond in America, and not one unsuspecting poodle has been snatched from the shore and dragged under by whatever's lurking in that murky, weed-choked water. Now maybe you think that "most famous pond" stuff is a little over the top. Maybe you think Walden Pond, where Thoreau derived his inspiration, is better known. But Walden Pond doesn't have killer fish roaming around like the Bloods and the Crips and the national media all over the story, and we got that here, baby.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
JOE GILBERT'S latest course offering at Salisbury State University almost makes you want to repeat college.This fall, the college lecturer's students will earn a semester's credit for sauntering in and about Henry David Thoreau's Walden Pond and woods near Concord, Mass.Don't mistake "saunter" to mean Gilbert's students will simply be lolling about as they canoe, swim, hike and observe.Thoreau, who had to deal with plenty of people who confused his nature tramps with vagrancy, practically reinvented the word saunter in a spirited essay, "Walking," completed near his death in 1862.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
JOE GILBERT'S latest course offering at Salisbury State University almost makes you want to repeat college.This fall, the college lecturer's students will earn a semester's credit for sauntering in and about Henry David Thoreau's Walden Pond and woods near Concord, Mass.Don't mistake "saunter" to mean Gilbert's students will simply be lolling about as they canoe, swim, hike and observe.Thoreau, who had to deal with plenty of people who confused his nature tramps with vagrancy, practically reinvented the word saunter in a spirited essay, "Walking," completed near his death in 1862.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | July 13, 2002
CROFTON - It's quiet out here. Too quiet. At 7 in the morning, a light mist still covers the most famous pond in America, and not one unsuspecting poodle has been snatched from the shore and dragged under by whatever's lurking in that murky, weed-choked water. Now maybe you think that "most famous pond" stuff is a little over the top. Maybe you think Walden Pond, where Thoreau derived his inspiration, is better known. But Walden Pond doesn't have killer fish roaming around like the Bloods and the Crips and the national media all over the story, and we got that here, baby.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 10, 1992
Getting a Don Henley tour on the road is a fairly complex operation, involving musicians, technicians, support staff and a small caravan of buses and trucks. There was none of that when the rock star rolled into Baltimore Friday evening, however -- just Henley, a woman friend, and a single road manager/bodyguard, all crammed into a rented Lincoln. No drum kit, no amplifiers, no stage lights, no busily scurrying roadies.There were plenty of fans, though. In fact, several hundred spent the better part of an hour lining up outside the Gordon's Booksellers shop in the Rotunda, eagerly waiting to meet Henley.
NEWS
By Robin Stratton | March 4, 1991
Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads-- Henry David ThoreauI don't think Henry wore a hat at Walden.It seems his head was bared to every wind,to sun and soil water bird and beast, even1/2to the woodchuck (though its undisciplinedconsumption of his beanfield bothered himat times). The laws of Concord didn't bind1/2him to a blind allegiance, nor was it whimthat led him to obey a different principlethan "thou shalt not." To skim1/2across the surface like a water-bug or lulloneself to sleep with pious platitudes wasnot to live at all. Living is the miracle1/2of choice pursued by few amid the buzzand gossip of the nameless thoughtless crowd.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1998
When Henry David Thoreau elected to abandon the hustle and bustle of life in 19th-century Concord, Mass., for Walden Pond, he took a slice of America's national character into the woods with him.Still embedded in most of us is the notion that the joys of materialism run amok are fleeting at best, and that enlightenment without serious contemplation in nature is a sham.When painter Arthur Dove and his wife and fellow artist, Helen Torr, left their upstate New York home in 1938 to take up residence in a single-room cabin on the shore of Long Island Sound, they were perhaps reliving the same longings that brought Thoreau to Walden.
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
There's one of those half-true quotes floating around the Internet that goes like this: "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. "  It's attributed to a quintessential American philosopher, Henry David Thoreau. Thoreau, however, was a good deal more long winded and the Internet version is more of a distillation of a much longer passage. The sentiment expressed, whether in short form or otherwise, is one that rings true, especially at this time of year and especially in places like the mouth of the Susquehanna River.
NEWS
June 13, 1992
The first Baltimore City Fair in 1970 was a novel experience that attempted to duplicate the excitement of a state fair in an urban context. It succeeded beyond anyone's expectations.In retrospect, that fair is now seen as a watershed event that marked Baltimore's turnaround from a decaying smokestack city into a forward-looking metropolis. Above all, the event changed Baltimoreans' feelings about their hometown, instilling optimism and unity of vision at a low ebb in the city's history after the 1968 riots.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 10, 1992
Getting a Don Henley tour on the road is a fairly complex operation, involving musicians, technicians, support staff and a small caravan of buses and trucks. There was none of that when the rock star rolled into Baltimore Friday evening, however -- just Henley, a woman friend, and a single road manager/bodyguard, all crammed into a rented Lincoln. No drum kit, no amplifiers, no stage lights, no busily scurrying roadies.There were plenty of fans, though. In fact, several hundred spent the better part of an hour lining up outside the Gordon's Booksellers shop in the Rotunda, eagerly waiting to meet Henley.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 10, 1992
Getting a Don Henley tour on the road is a fairly complex operation, involving musicians, technicians, support staff and a small caravan of buses and trucks. There was none of that when the rock star rolled into Baltimore Friday evening, however -- just Henley, a woman friend, and a single road manager/bodyguard, all crammed into a rented Lincoln. No drum kit, no amplifiers, no stage lights, no busily scurrying roadies.There were plenty of fans, though. In fact, several hundred spent the better part of an hour lining up outside the Gordon's Booksellers shop in the Rotunda, eagerly waiting to meet Henley.
FEATURES
October 9, 2002
James Earl Jones says sci-fi books rescued him Actor James Earl Jones says he found his trademark baritone voice in science fiction books after retreating as a child into silence because of a stutter. Testifying Tuesday at a hearing on literacy before the House subcommittee on education, Jones, the voice of Darth Vader in Star Wars and King Mufasa in The Lion King, said reading Jules Verne as a child enabled him to have hundreds of conversations in his head while being a mute to the outside world for all practical purposes.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker | August 4, 1991
Henry David Thoreau had his walking shoes and Walden Pond.And I have found something equally as peaceful, yet healthy -- a bicycle and the back roads of Carroll County.While most people know the health benefits associated with bicycling, few realize the sense of freedom and the almost intimate glimpses of nature that riding a bicycle allows.Carroll County residentsare particularly lucky to have countless back roads that wind through woods, over streams, around farms and up hills, affording panoramicviews of the countryside.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.