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By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | January 17, 1995
Howard County School Superintendent Michael E. Hickey -- who last year asked to be reappointed to his job -- is one of two finalists for the top school post in the county school system that serves Raleigh, N.C.News of his finalist status for the Wake County superintendency comes as Howard's five-member school board is evaluating Dr. Hickey's performance with the goal of determining within several weeks whether to renew his contract when it ends in June...
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NEWS
Erica L. Green | May 16, 2013
The deputy superintendent for the Baltimore County school system will step down next month, officials confirmed Thursday. Kevin Hobbs, who was brought on by Superintendent Dallas Dance last year, will return to his family in North Carolina, said schools spokesman Mychael Dickerson. Dance informed the county school board of Hobbs' planned departure, saying that he "vigorously recruited [Hobbs]," who was a top administrator in the Wake County, N.C., public schools, to help him during his transition.
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NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | January 31, 1995
Howard County schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey played his hand until the last minute as a contender for the superintendent's job in a 77,000-student North Carolina school system. In the end, he only broke even.He has the promise of a new four-year contract -- something he says he eventually would have won anyway -- and gets to keep a retirement benefit package that would have been cut dramatically had he left for Wake County, N.C., the system that serves Raleigh.But the 56-year-old educator, who on Friday took himself out of the running for the Wake County job, has yet to win a raise, better benefits or new perquisites in his war of nerves with the Howard County school board.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Kevin Hobbs, a top administrator in the Wake County, N.C., public schools, appeared on the verge of becoming the new deputy superintendent in Baltimore County schools Tuesday night before the school board voted 6-6 against the appointment because of a certification issue. Hobbs, who is new superintendent Dallas Dance's pick for the job, is expected to get the appointment July 10 when the board next meets. But board members said they wanted to wait until Hobbs has completed a six-week course.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Kevin Hobbs, a top administrator in the Wake County, N.C., public schools, appeared on the verge of becoming the new deputy superintendent in Baltimore County schools Tuesday night before the school board voted 6-6 against the appointment because of a certification issue. Hobbs, who is new superintendent Dallas Dance's pick for the job, is expected to get the appointment July 10 when the board next meets. But board members said they wanted to wait until Hobbs has completed a six-week course.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | May 16, 2013
The deputy superintendent for the Baltimore County school system will step down next month, officials confirmed Thursday. Kevin Hobbs, who was brought on by Superintendent Dallas Dance last year, will return to his family in North Carolina, said schools spokesman Mychael Dickerson. Dance informed the county school board of Hobbs' planned departure, saying that he "vigorously recruited [Hobbs]," who was a top administrator in the Wake County, N.C., public schools, to help him during his transition.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1999
Saying he was "absolutely tortured" by the case, a federal judge has acquitted three men accused of being Eastern Shore drug dealers, ruling the government did not prove that they were involved in the conspiracy with which they were charged.Although U.S. District Chief Judge J. Frederick Motz said he was not "suggesting prosecutorial abuse," he expressed concern about the government's growing use of conspiracy statutes, which allow evidence that would not be allowed in other criminal cases.
NEWS
February 16, 2003
Mary Englert Anderson, a retired secretary for the Baltimore City Fire Department, died Monday at the Sunrise of Raleigh assisted-living facility in North Carolina. She was 93. Born Mary Englert in New York City, she moved to Maryland in 1940 when she married Thomas Betts Anderson. Mr. Anderson died in 1961. Mrs. Anderson lived in Baltimore for more than 50 years and retired from the Fire Department at 62, after about 25 years of work for the city. She was known for her sense of humor.
NEWS
October 4, 2005
On Sunday, October 2, 2005, DOROTHY ELLEN De WITT (nee Crout), 90, died at Alterra Clare Bridge in Cary, NC. A native of Baltimore, MD, Mrs. De Witt was retired from the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. After her retirement, she moved to Chapel Hill to be close to her family. She was an active member of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, and was co-founder of the Quilter's Group, which provides quilts for Lutheran World Relief and local families in need. She was involved in the Daughters of the American Revolution in both Baltimore and Chapel Hill.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
Until last weekend, Michael E. Hickey seemed set on continuing as Howard County school superintendent for another four years after his third term expires in June 1996.Seven months ago, he made it clear to the school board that he wanted to help Howard's 36,000-student school system deal with rapid growth and other issues.And this fall -- with talk of his reappointment imminent -- he started an extensive strategic planning process, involving thousands of school employees and county residents in charting a course for the school system into the next century.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | January 31, 1995
Howard County schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey played his hand until the last minute as a contender for the superintendent's job in a 77,000-student North Carolina school system. In the end, he only broke even.He has the promise of a new four-year contract -- something he says he eventually would have won anyway -- and gets to keep a retirement benefit package that would have been cut dramatically had he left for Wake County, N.C., the system that serves Raleigh.But the 56-year-old educator, who on Friday took himself out of the running for the Wake County job, has yet to win a raise, better benefits or new perquisites in his war of nerves with the Howard County school board.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | January 17, 1995
Howard County School Superintendent Michael E. Hickey -- who last year asked to be reappointed to his job -- is one of two finalists for the top school post in the county school system that serves Raleigh, N.C.News of his finalist status for the Wake County superintendency comes as Howard's five-member school board is evaluating Dr. Hickey's performance with the goal of determining within several weeks whether to renew his contract when it ends in June...
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | January 17, 1995
Howard County Schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey -- who last year asked to be reappointed to his job -- is one of two finalists for the top schools post in the county system that serves Raleigh, N.C.News of his finalist status for the Wake County superintendency comes as Howard's five-member school board is evaluating his performance with the goal of determining within several weeks whether to renew his contract when it ends in June 1996.Just seven months ago, Dr. Hickey asked the Howard board to reappoint him, saying he wanted to help the Howard school system deal with challenges such as its explosive growth and the rapidly changing ethnic and racial composition of its student population.
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