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SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Jason LaCanfora and Buster Olney and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF The Hartford Courant contributed to this article | July 7, 1996
The Orioles placed catcher Chris Hoiles on outright waivers within the last month, making him available to any team for $20,000, according to league sources. However, no team took Hoiles, who still has 3 1/2 years remaining on the five-year, $17.25 million deal he signed before the 1995 season.By placing Hoiles on waivers, the Orioles' obvious hope was to have another team claim him and take on the rest of his contract. Orioles assistant general manager Kevin Malone would not confirm that waivers had been asked on Hoiles, and wouldn't comment.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
In the first overhaul of its 25-year-old subdivision ordinance, Anne Arundel County officials will try to legalize some of the pro-growth recommendations of a committee that studied the granting of school waivers.One of the most explosive ideas the committee outlined in June was to deny permission to build new houses in areas where elementary schools are at 115 percent of capacity and upper schools are at 120 percent of capacity."That's unbelievable," said school board member Thomas Twombly, referring to plans to overhaul the ordinance.
SPORTS
September 8, 1991
Dave Parker, unable to find his stroke at age 40, was put on the waivers yesterday by the California Angels, a day after the team made Whitey Herzog its director of player personnel.The Angels got Parker in March from the Milwaukee Brewers in a trade for outfielder Dante Bichette and pitcher Brandy Vann. Parker spent last season with the Brewers, batting .289 with 21 home runs and 92 RBI.But Parker, a seven-time All-Star, was batting .232 with 11 home runs and 56 RBI in 119 games this season.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
Last spring, when the County Council dumped a proposal to rein in the Owens administration's power on key development issues, it was heralded as the dawn of a new day of trust between council members and County Executive Janet S. Owens. No one is saying a deep freeze has set in, but that same proposal -- to require public hearings before the county could give developers major waivers to subdivision rules -- is back. Two council Democrats, Barbara D. Samorajczyk of Annapolis and Shirley Murphy of Pasadena, introduced two related bills Monday.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
In a victory for Anne Arundel County, the state's highest court dismissed yesterday a developers' lawsuit seeking millions of dollars in refunds of money and property they gave the government in exchange for exemptions allowing them to build homes in areas where schools and roads were overburdened. The unanimous Court of Appeals ruling ends the prospect of the county being ordered to refund what developers claimed was more than $7 million the county collected over more than a decade in deals they said evaded county laws and nearly amounted to extortion.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
Less than three months before the state's sweeping smoking ban will go into effect, supporters and opponents of the ban tackled the details of the proposed regulations at a public hearing yesterday, focusing on a provision allowing for temporary waivers. The waivers would give bars and restaurants that prove financial hardship a three-year extension to comply with the smoking ban. State officials are proposing that, to obtain a waiver, businesses would have to show that the first two months of the smoking ban caused gross sales of food and beverages to decline at least 15 percent compared with the same period over the two previous years.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Orioles manager Davey Johnson sat behind the desk in his office before last night's game, gazed at a small group of reporters and said, "Make it easy on me, guys. I've already had a tough day."He had spent about three hours in an organizational meeting, then had to inform six more players they wouldn't be on the Opening Day roster.The most notable was left-hander Rick Krivda, who won an important game last September in Boston and was a candidate to be the fifth starter.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The Orioles took a step toward shoring up their inexperienced bullpen yesterday, but enough uncertainty remains that they continue to check the waiver wire and discuss trade options for another reliever. Before their final home game of the spring at Fort Lauderdale Stadium, the Orioles announced they had added right-hander Jim Brower to their 40-man roster, basically securing an Opening Day spot for the 33-year-old veteran who had been a nonroster invitee. "I think that we need some experience out in the bullpen and he has done it before in the big leagues," Orioles manager Sam Perlozzo said of Brower.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2002
Allegheny Energy Inc. said yesterday that two of its subsidiaries have received monthlong extensions on default waivers granted by lenders, giving the company more time to work out its financial troubles. The Hagerstown company said waivers granted Nov. 4 to Allegheny Energy Supply Co. LLC and Allegheny Generating Co. have been extended to Dec. 31. The waivers, which ended a technical default, initially had been granted through Nov. 29. The company has been struggling with a liquidity crunch, a weakened wholesale energy market and problems associated with its trading business.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | February 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Struggling to boost its ranks in wartime, the Army has sharply increased the number of recruits who would normally be barred because of criminal misconduct or alcohol and illegal drug problems, once again raising concerns that the Army is lowering its standards to make its recruiting goals. Last year, almost one in six Army recruits had a problem in their background that would have disqualified them from military service. In order to accept them, the Army granted special exceptions, known as recruiting waivers.
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