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By Stephen B. Awalt | December 16, 2012
Here they are, the greatest generation, looking pretty ordinary: armed now with carts and canes, bragging about their grandchildren, complaining about their doctors and relishing their deserts. Every other Monday night I visit my father at the Annapolis retirement community where he lives, and I have come to know the dinner menu as well as a bit about his friends from the World War II generation. At 90 my father doesn't say so much, but he and his dinner companions like the company of younger people (at 53, I count as younger)
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A few months after adopting a kitten, David Grimm and his fiancee huddled late one evening in the waiting room of a Towson emergency vet. Jasper, their normally rambunctious gray-and-white kitten, was suffering from acute kidney failure. Although the couple had only had Jasper for a short time, he had become a member of their family. Facing the prospect of his death was devastating. Grimm looked around the waiting room. Families were keeping the sorts of grim vigils usually associated with hospital emergency rooms.
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NEWS
By Joan Bonato | September 20, 1991
THE SQUARE, bleached box sits high on the wall of the hospital waiting room.One can't see the strings that hold it nor the buttons to turn it on and off. It defies life and death and gravity, but it does more, and it is profound. Glossy faces howl with delight, and young, robust men and women play games with suited plastic practitioners.Always there is sound, waves and waves of exaggerated sound barking off information about dating and hobbies and soap. There are flashes of feminine-looking men pretending to be doctors and unscathed lovely women lying about pre-menstrual tensions.
NEWS
By Stephen B. Awalt | December 16, 2012
Here they are, the greatest generation, looking pretty ordinary: armed now with carts and canes, bragging about their grandchildren, complaining about their doctors and relishing their deserts. Every other Monday night I visit my father at the Annapolis retirement community where he lives, and I have come to know the dinner menu as well as a bit about his friends from the World War II generation. At 90 my father doesn't say so much, but he and his dinner companions like the company of younger people (at 53, I count as younger)
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
A group of volunteer lawyers traded their suits for T-shirts and jeans yesterday to roll the first fresh paint on a new waiting room for children at the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse in downtown Baltimore.The waiting room, being constructed in an office formerly used by attorneys, will have a bright atmosphere with donated books and toys that should offer a much-needed alternative to the dank, musty halls where children wait for juvenile court now, organizers said yesterday."A lot of people bring children to the courthouse for whatever reason," said Miriam Hutchins, a Baltimore Circuit Court domestic master who volunteered yesterday.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2004
It's an image that social worker Shannon Wood can't get out of her mind: A 7-year-old girl sits for two days on a dirty tile floor inside the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse in Baltimore, playing with hand-me-down Barbie dolls and waiting to testify as a witness to her mother's murder. Wood, a licensed forensic social worker who interviews child witnesses for the city state's attorney's office, said she hated knowing that children such as the 7-year-old are confined to an uncomfortable waiting room with few toys and gray decor during the trial process.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2004
Hundreds of children go through Howard County Circuit Court each year, usually for traumatic reasons - they may be testifying in child-abuse cases or their parents could be divorcing. It is an unpleasant experience made worse by having to wait for hours in the crowded, sometimes hectic courthouse hallways. But now they have their own sanctuary - a quaint waiting room, decorated with a jungle mural, that's solely for children - as Howard joins a growing number of courthouses locally and across the nation offering family waiting rooms.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | January 2, 1996
THOSE OF us who came of age when the age was Aquarius believed that beauty was in your soul or your politics. It certainly was not in your cheekbones or your breasts.Once we believed that anything more than blush and lip gloss constituted self-mutilation.Now our bodies are overrun by time and gravity and a metabolism that has slowed to a crawl, and our ears perk when other women discuss things like tummy tucks, lip waxing, vein stripping, skin peeling and face lifts.The beauty we see slipping away from us has always been a trap into which women are herded, often willingly, by men and by the complicity of other women.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | June 18, 1993
The one thing you don't want to beIs Bill Clinton's first nominee;Whom you hired, what you wrote+ Will get somebody's goat --You'll wish you'd said, 'Don't lookat me!'For certain, no area vexesThe Democrats now more than Texas;A new Senate pair,' Perot and Bush there --Too bad the state still isn't Mex's.The health plan devised by his mateBill tells us again will be late;With M.D. on the door,) What a waiting room's forIs to wait and to wait and to wait.The Pentagon pack-rats don't knowHow many wars' worth of ammoAnd other stored stuff$ Is more than enough;The one thing they don't saveis dough.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2004
Visit a typical emergency room, and you are likely to be greeted by a hospital worker with a tall stack of registration papers and a long waiting list. The $13.4 million emergency department that opens today at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center seeks to change all that with a single innovation: the "quick-look nurse." From a desk similar to a hotel concierge's - right down to the oversized vase of flowers - the nurse will ask only patients' name, date of birth and reason for visiting before shepherding them off to a patient-care room for full registration and the medical evaluation.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
A man who shot himself in the head outside the emergency room in North Baltimore's Union Memorial Hospital on Thursday left a note indicating he chose that locale because he wanted to donate his organs to medicine, according to law enforcement source. Baltimore police reported that the 29-year-old man was severely injured and later transferred to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was in critical condition Thursday night. Officials declined to discuss other details about the note or the motivation, other than to say that homicide detectives are investigating the incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 26, 2011
Someone called to testify Wednesday before the grand jury looking into the Ehrlich campaign's deceptive Election Day robocalls tells me Towson attorney Robert B. Green was in the waiting room, offering to consult with any witnesses connected to the campaign. I phoned Green, and his partner, David B. Irwin , took the call. “My firm represents the Bob Ehrlich for Maryland Committee, that's what I can tell you,” said Irwin, a former federal prosecutor and white-collar criminal defense lawyer.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 26, 2007
I was in Columbia the other day, in one of those village centers that's near one of those hellish traffic circles they like out there, when I pulled into a Sunoco station. Two things struck me immediately. One was the price of a gallon of unleaded, which was higher there than in most places, probably because you burn a lot of gas driving around looking for the stupid village centers. But the other thing was this: On top of each pump was a TV. Don't ask me if it was a plasma or LCD or whatever, because I'm not up on that stuff and don't much care about it, either.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUn Columnist | December 28, 2006
As has become traditional in this space, it's time to look over the columns of 2006 and see who we offended in the hope of making things right -- or at least getting another column without a lot of heavy lifting. Topping the list of the hugely aggrieved in 2006: home painting contractors. After a column about the nightmare my wife and I had trying to get our living room and dining room painted and the joy of dealing with these people -- estimates that are all over the map, contractors who don't even bother to call you back, contractors who bad-mouth the work of other contractors -- I heard from several ticked-off contractors.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | April 10, 2006
If you need to visit a doctor for any reason at all these days, one thing's for sure: You better be good at waiting. Because first you wait in the waiting room. Then someone calls your name and takes you back to an examining room and says: "OK, now wait in here." Sometimes, they like to tease you by adding: "The doctor will see you shortly." But that's just to test your psychological makeup and see how gullible you are. The truth is, you might wait longer in the examining room to see the doctor than you did in the waiting room.
NEWS
By JOHN MONAHAN | April 9, 2006
I was scared and tired and uncomfortable and frustrated. I'm certainly not the first person to feel that way in a doctor's waiting room, but I had spent so much time in them over the last few months that it seemed almost unbearable. Fortunately, I had my wife with me. She could hold my hand and comfort me. She was there in the examining room to ask the doctor questions I didn't think of or remind me of the date of my last MRI or blood test. I could rely on her to take notes and write down when my next appointment was. They were simple things, but they made everything bearable.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | December 5, 1993
The patient at the doctor's office in Havre de Grace Wednesday afternoon had no appointment and really didn't want to sit in the waiting room.In fact, she shunned entering the front door of Dr. Louis Silverstein' office at 806 S. Union Ave. Instead she acted like a real animal, smashing through a side window at 2:30 p.m.Nurse Barbara Schramm was on the telephone when she heard the shattering glass and dashed into the hallway."
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
With some tropical paint, sand-colored carpet and a donation from a Timonium church, a once-drab third-floor room of a downtown courthouse is being transformed into something resembling an aquarium. What used to be a conference room at the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Circuit Courthouse is becoming an interview and waiting room for children who are victims or witnesses of crimes in the city. A mural outside the room depicts a tank full of fish, and the inside walls and ceiling are painted chartreuse and lavender.
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