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NEWS
November 17, 1991
Officials at the Sexual Assault Treatment Center at Family and Children's Services say they have dramatically reduced the number of people on a waiting list for counseling.At the end of July, 63 children and adults were awaiting treatment. Some were adult survivors of sexual assault and others were children who were sexually assaulted in the past, said Beth Albright, management associate at the agency.As of last week, 16 people were waiting for counseling, said Albright Thursday afternoon at the monthly meeting of the county's Child Sexual Assault Committee.
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NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The city expects a flood of applications when it opens the wait list for Section 8 housing vouchers this month for the first time in more than a decade. Housing advocates say 50,000 families or more might sign up for a lottery to fill 25,000 places on the Housing Authority's wait list for the tenant-based housing choice vouchers. The coveted federal subsidies help families pay the portion of their rent that exceeds 30 percent of their income. The vouchers can be used to rent any residence, subject to a cap. In Baltimore, that is roughly $900 for a one-bedroom apartment.
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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
Addressing a demand for senior housing that has left about 250 people on its waiting list, Carroll County's largest retirement community is planning a $60 million expansion that would double the size of its hilltop campus in Westminster. Carroll Lutheran Village is to formally announce today plans for its 29-acre Wakefield Overlook project, which is to include 82 apartments, 60 houses, a new indoor pool, exercise room, classrooms, a doctor's office, a bistro and a convenience store. The community has about 500 residents, who come from Carroll County and elsewhere.
NEWS
By Amanda Frost | June 13, 2014
On Monday, the Supreme Court dashed the hopes of noncitizen children who had already waited years for visas to come to the United States with their families. Federal law allows immigrants to bring their unmarried, minor children with them to the U.S., but those same laws put strict annual quotas on visas, forcing applicants to wait years for a visa to become available. If the children turn 21 years old during that waiting period, they must be left behind. In its decision in Mayorkas v. Cuellar de Osorio, the high court held that these older children must get in the back of a new line and start the visa petition process all over again, denying them credit for the years they have already spent waiting.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Sun staff writer Laura Lippman contributed to this article | September 24, 1998
One by one, parents got the phone call this summer and listened to the words they never thought they'd hear: Help is on the way.Their children have mental retardation, cerebral palsy or autism. Nearly 6,000 developmentally disabled people have been on a waiting list for years, and under a new, five-year state initiative, they are finally getting services: a volunteer job; a safe, clean place to live; a person to take them to the movies.Nicknamed the "dead and dying list" because parents often had to die before their disabled adult children got help, the roster was one of the longest in the country.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
CLARIFICATIONAn article in Monday's editions on the popularity of parochial ++ schools in Howard County should have reported that tuition at Resurrection-St. Paul School in Ellicott City is $2,790 for children of parishioners.Though they are in a county that boasts some of the most respected public schools in Maryland, Howard County's parochial schools are in the midst of a growth spurt as more parents look for an education that puts religion on equal footing with academics.Take the Resurrection-St.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
Annapolis' housing authority generally administers its Section 8 housing subsidy program according to federal guidelines but has failed to adequately maintain its applicant waiting list, a federal audit has found. The audit, by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, found that the authority conducted annual inspections of units and provided tenants with safe and sanitary housing and reasonable assistance payments between July 2003 through June 2005, the period reviewed. The authority is required to update its waiting list and file applications based on when they are submitted.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | September 29, 1991
She came 350 miles from upstate New York to Carroll County, leaving the comforting support of family to try to mend a rocky marriage and establish a stable home for her two young children. Instead, within amonth, her hopes for reconciliation with her husband vanished, and Theresa (not her real name) and her children faced eviction from the relative's apartment they were occupying temporarily. With no income, an unsympathetic landlord and slim prospects for finding an affordable apartment within a week, Theresa turned to the only option she believed she had -- a homeless shelter.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1998
A former West Baltimore apartment manager who exploited the shortage of subsidized housing by collecting bribes from people wanting to bypass a two-year waiting list was given a 10-month sentence yesterday.Dorothy Y. Budd accepted $22,500 in bribes from 1993 to 1996 from about 15 tenants seeking apartments at the Poppleton Cooperative, a 96-unit federally subsidized development at 838 W. Fairmount Ave.Budd, 46, who was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, took advantage of a shortage of subsidized housing that has forced some city residents to wait as long as 15 years to receive Section 8 vouchers.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2003
More than 800 low-income families, elderly residents and disabled people from Carroll have applied for fewer than two dozen housing-assistance "vouchers," creating the longest waiting list in memory, county officials said yesterday. Some seeking assistance could wait as long as two years, Carroll's Bureau of Housing staff said yesterday while presenting a plan for providing rent subsidies to the area's neediest through funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Through the federal government's HUD program, the county has 549 housing-choice vouchers available.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Millions of dollars in scholarship money that the state could have provided to about 8,000 needy college students has sat untouched, according to an audit released Wednesday. Auditors from the Office of Legislative Audits found that the Maryland Higher Education Commission did not spend all of the money in its scholarship fund, with the number growing from $9.9 million in 2011 to $17.2 million this year. Auditors estimated that the $17 million could have paid for the scholarships of about 7,800 of the 16,400 students on a waiting list.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
When the lights dim for "Hunger Games" at midnight Thursday, Fatimah Nelson, who bought tickets weeks ago, will be there, a bit breathless, at the edge of a plush seat at Arundel Mills. "I've been waiting months and months and months," says the Baltimore 21-year-old. "I'm really excited. " Nelson and millions of others in Maryland and around the country are braced for the opening of "Hunger Games," the latest young adult book series to become a runaway hit and then a movie and, it's looking like, a cultural phenomenon on the likes of "Harry Potter" and "Twilight.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
Despite the growing number of charter schools in Maryland, 3,000 students remain on waiting lists and advocates say legislators should loosen the ties that prevent further growth and support of charters. Some charter schools have so many students who want to go there that they could fill every seat twice, said David Miller, director of the Maryland Charter School Network. City Neighbors Charter School in Baltimore has 198 students and 420 students on the waiting list, said Principal Mike Chalupa.
NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | July 27, 2009
A state agency is sorting through its waiting list of 19,000 developmentally disabled people to see if they still need services, a step that highlights a decades-old backlog of families seeking scarce state funding. Starting with those in the highest need category, the Developmental Disabilities Administration is working its way through the list, a process that is estimated to take six months. "It will help us with planning for services," Executive Director Michael Chapman said. Those services range from behavioral support services to medical day care, but Chapman said most people are seeking home support services or funding for a day care program.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2008
Angelique C. Graham of Columbia said her passion for nursing comes from personal experience on the other side of the stethoscope. She battled acute myelogenous leukemia as a young adult. She said she remembers in particular one nurse whose comments left her discouraged and another who, when she was feeling defeated, told her to keep fighting and "prepared me for everything that could possibly happen." The supportive nurse "was able to make a difference," she said, and even the one who was not made her realize that "nurses are key to everyone's recovery."
NEWS
November 1, 2008
"Housing and health" (Commentary, Oct. 24) was a compelling and thought-provoking column about the positive correlation between housing and health. However, I reject the authors' conclusion that "closing the waiting list for the Housing Choice Voucher Program will make a bad situation worse." There are 16,000 families on the waiting list for this program, many of whom have been there for five or more years, and new applicants would go to the bottom of the list and not be served for many years.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2003
Baltimore housing officials are shutting down the waiting list for the city's largest subsidized housing rental program, and applicants have just two weeks to act before the cutoff takes effect. Officials say the list has grown too long - with 15,690 names - and there's no point in taking more applications until it shrinks. But the Feb. 14 deadline to get on the list for the federally funded Section 8 program has some housing activists concerned that residents needing assistance will be stranded and that mass confusion will result when the waiting list is reactivated.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
Besieged by 2,800 low-income families seeking help with their rent, Howard County's Housing Commission has voted to close the waiting list for federal Section 8 housing vouchers for the first time in 15 years. Leonard S. Vaughan, the county housing director, said the county has not received new housing vouchers for the past four years and current certificates are turning over very slowly as the waiting list lengthens. "We'll probably be closing the list for at least six months," he said.
NEWS
By Margo Candelaria, Sarah Oberlander and Maureen Black | October 24, 2008
The nation's housing crisis is also a health crisis - especially for children. When families lose stable housing, children lose the bedrock that anchors them to schools, neighborhoods, medical services, child care and social services, often with serious consequences for their health. As of today, the Housing Authority of Baltimore City is closing the waiting list for the Housing Choice Voucher Program (Section 8) because it has enough applicants for the next 12 months. In other words, families who need stable housing have to wait at least a year before getting onto a waiting list.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Reporter | April 18, 2008
About 100 low-income families are set to get Section 8 federal rent vouchers as Howard County prepares to reopen its long-closed waiting list next month. Once the list opens, probably after May 15, new families will be able to apply, though it may take a year or more to serve some of them, said Howard County housing officials. The reopening of the county list, closed since November 2003, also will help families living in the county's homeless shelter by creating more opportunities to obtain apartments through the federal rent subsidy program, said Sam Tucker, Section 8 coordinator.
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