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FEATURES
March 2, 1994
Many Baltimore-area private schools -- elementary and secondary -- are sending out notices this week, letting anxious parents know whether their sons and daughters have been accepted. If you're sitting on pins and needles waiting to learn whether your son or daughter has been accepted or placed on the dreaded waiting list, The Sun would like to talk to you about these anxious moments so many area parents share. Call Sundial, The Sun's telephone information service, at (410) 783-1800. In Anne Arundel County call 268-7736; in Harford County, 836-5028; in Carroll County, 848-0338.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014
Maryland's legislature decided to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana for a few reasons. Lawmakers concluded that police and prosecutors should not be focusing their attention on what is increasingly viewed by the public as a relatively harmless vice; they expressed concern that criminal convictions related to marijuana possession were harming the employment and educational prospects of thousands of Marylanders; and they were alarmed...
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NEWS
August 19, 1997
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NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The city expects a flood of applications when it opens the wait list for Section 8 housing vouchers this month for the first time in more than a decade. Housing advocates say 50,000 families or more might sign up for a lottery to fill 25,000 places on the Housing Authority's wait list for the tenant-based housing choice vouchers. The coveted federal subsidies help families pay the portion of their rent that exceeds 30 percent of their income. The vouchers can be used to rent any residence, subject to a cap. In Baltimore, that is roughly $900 for a one-bedroom apartment.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | February 12, 1994
Another year, another Valentine's Day, and still no sign of Mr. Right on the horizon.Or even Mr. Half-Right.It's odd, but Valentine's Day is beginning to affect me in the same way as New Year's Day. Which is to say: I find myself looking over the past year and assessing my life. In this case, my love life.Right now, for instance, I'm trying to remember two things: The name of every man I've ever loved and the name of every man I ever thought I loved.The first list is short. You could count the names on two fingers of your hand.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | May 5, 2006
How much pain can you take? It may be a case of mind over matter, experts say. Brain scans of volunteers given a series of electric shocks demonstrated a variety of reactions. Some dreaded each successive shock, while others managed to keep what was coming out of their minds, according to a team of Atlanta researchers whose study was published today. Volunteers who dreaded the pain most were willing to endure more intense pain if they could get it over with quickly. Those who kept their minds off the impending shocks were willing to wait longer -- and endured less intense shocks as a result, the researchers say. The study may help scientists determine how a fear of pain plays out in everyday decisions, such as whether to invest in a stock or schedule a dental appointment, said Dr. Gregory S. Berns, a physician and neuroscientist at the Emory University School of Medicine who led the study.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
In its first two wins this season, the No. 1 McDonogh girls soccer team scored goals in bunches - 17 in all before Saturday's home game against No. 2 River Hill. The visiting Hawks made things much more difficult. It took 66 minutes before McDonogh finally broke through on its 13th shot on goal. After Gaby Vincent's corner kick, it took three chances in front of the net before All-Metro first-team selection Bridgette Andrzejewski, a junior forward, found an opening in the heavy traffic past River Hill goalkeeper Julia Craine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The clouds didn't exactly part for the Blue Angels, but they lifted just enough Saturday afternoon, the rain stopped, and suddenly three F/A-18 Hornets soared past in tight formation over the southeast edge of the Inner Harbor — the show was on for the Star-Spangled Spectacular. Thousands of people gathered at the Inner Harbor to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the national anthem waited nearly two hours for a glimpse of the team, as the rain sprinkled on and off, clouds lowered and lifted again, and the Blue Angels waited for safe flying conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
When the first video of Ray Rice dragging his then-fiancee off a casino elevator like a slab of meat appeared, I thought, "God bless TMZ. " With TMZ's release of video today showing him punching Janay Palmer twice and knocking her to the floor, I say, God bless TMZ again and again. You can read what I wrote in February here under the headline: "Ray Rice and how TMZ counters the great American hype machine. " TMZ did the job the mainstream sports media failed to do in showing us the ugliness of this incident.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Opening night at Horseshoe Casino Baltimore went off without a major hitch despite larger-than-expected crowds, long lines and some early jitters, casino and city officials said Wednesday. About 15,000 people visited the casino Tuesday night, said general manager Chad Barnhill. Officials had only expected about 10,000, and lines stretched around the building from well before the casino's 9 p.m. opening until well after. "I think it's pent-up demand," Barnhill said. "We had everybody in the doors shortly after midnight.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The Oakland Athletics released former Orioles closer Jim Johnson on Friday, which means that any club will be able to sign him at just the prorated portion of the minimum major league salary soon. Chances are, that club will be the Orioles, who dealt Johnson to the A's to avoid a big arbitration payday. But there is some question as to exactly when he will be available to sign, so manager Buck Showalter was hesitant to talk about him during Friday's pregame news briefing. “He still has a day or two, as I understand it, and some things he has to clear before he becomes public fodder to talk about,” Showalter said, “so I don't think that's there yet, from what I've been told.” Johnson was designated for assignment July 24, after a rocky tenure with the A's in which he struggled from the start and quickly lost his closer role.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
A chain-link fence marks the edge of Aberdeen Proving Ground, an Army installation where a nationwide base reorganization was supposed to bring so many people and jobs to Harford County that officials worried they would not have the space or resources to meet demand. Inside the fence, an estimated 21,000 people report to work, conducting research in massive new buildings. Shots fire in the distance. Sometimes bombs explode. But outside the fence, gleaming new offices completed in anticipation of economic spillover stand empty, a reminder that any growth that's taken place growth remains tightly contained.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
I can't wait to hear the full explanation from NBC as to why it pulled correspondent Ayman Mohyeldin from Gaza on the eve of the Israeli invasion today. The act came after the former Al Jazeera reporter had done two weeks of superb on-the-ground reporting from Gaza. I wrote about that reporting here and here . Mohyeldin was replaced by Richard Engel, the network's chief foreign correspondent. The only explanation the network provided was that the move was made for "security concerns," according to Glenn Greenwald, who reported the story here . As much contempt as I have for the lack of journalistic backbone at NBC News management, I am not going to jump to conclusions as to why the move was made.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
I don't live in Baltimore, but I have been following the workers' struggle at Hopkins closely. A $15 per hour minimum wage is a no brainer in today's world ( "A win-win for Hopkins," July 8). People often use the "small business" red herring to really say that working people are asking for too much when they ask for $15. But Hopkins isn't a small business, so that isn't plausible at all, at least not here. The author admits that Ronald Peterson, president of Hopkins, made over $15 million this past year, but worries about passing on costs to the consumer.
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