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By A.M. Chaplin and A.M. Chaplin,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
The other day I had an out-of-time experience. All I did was try on a pair of jeans at the Gap in Towson Town Center -- but when I looked in the mirror, it was my '70s self staring back out at me.The cause was the cut. I had been there, done that cut of pants: the waist below the natural waist, the butt and thighs tight, and the legs flaring slightly a little below the knees. It was the cut for pants about 25 years ago, and it's the cut for pants now.It looked good on me, but I wasn't sure it looked right -- they're not always the same thing.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
Rescue crews spent nearly an hour Friday freeing a 15-year-old boy from waist-deep mud in Pasadena, officials said. The teen was transported to Maryland Shock Trauma Center with serious, but not life threatening injuries, said Anne Arundel County Fire Department Capt. Michael Pfaltzgraff. It wasn't immediately clear how the teen ended up in the mud near Water Oak Point and Old Water Oak Point roads, he said. Crews were dispatched around 1:30 p.m. A technical rope rescue using wood planks was used to free the teen.
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SPORTS
November 5, 1993
The tale of the tape for tomorrow night's heavyweight title fight between Evander Holyfield and IBF and WBA champion Riddick Bowe at Caesars Palace, Las Vegas:.. .. .. ..Holyfield.. .. .. ..BoweAge .. .. ..31 .. .. .. .. .. 26Weight .. ..217 .. .. .. .. ..246Height .. ..6-2 1/2 .. .. .. .. .6-5Reach .. .. 77 1/2 .. .. .. .. ..81Chest (normal) .. 43 .. .. ..46Chest (expanded)..45 .. .. ..50Biceps .. .. .. ..16 .. .. ..17Forearm .. .. .. 12 1/2 .. .. ..12 1/2Waist .. .. .. ..32 .. .. .. 38Thigh .. .. ... 32 .. .. .. 26 1/2Calf .. .. .. .. 13 .. .. .. 16 1/2Neck .. .. .. ..19 1/2 .. .. .. 17 1/2Wrist .. .. .. ..7 1/2 .. .. .. ..8Fist .. .. .. ..12 1/2 .. .. .. 13 1/2
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2011
Since the late '90s, Mates of State have been a staple of the indie rock world. The husband-and-wife duo consists of Jason Hammel and Kori Gardner, who combine keyboard, drums and vocals to create energetic harmonies. Over the past 14 years, the Lawrence, Kan. natives have released seven albums and played with bands such as Jimmy Eat World and Death Cab for Cutie. On Tuesday their travels will take them to The Ottobar , where they will perform songs from their most recent album "Mountaintops.
NEWS
By Pamela Sitt and Pamela Sitt,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 18, 2004
The chick flick of the moment, Julia Roberts' Mona Lisa Smile, is resplendent with details befitting a proper lady: red lips, pearls, gloves and a sleek silhouette. In this case, the lady is a 1950s Wellesley Girl -- but one need only look to fashion runways, contemporary magazines and well-heeled city streets to realize that a modern-day version of the Wellesley Girl has marched into mainstream fashion. We asked Mona Lisa Smile costume designer Michael Dennison, the man who dressed a cast including Julia Stiles, Kirsten Dunst and Maggie Gyllenhaal, about how to bring 1950s style into modern day. What is the look of a Wellesley Girl, circa 1950, and how did you define it?
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | November 13, 1990
For Dr. Reubin Andres, the new weight charts that accompany the revised "Dietary Guidelines for Americans" are a kind of vindication."Victory at last!" said Dr. Andres, clinical director of the National Institute of Aging. For years, Dr. Andres has been saying that while obesity is bad at any age, death rates are lower for older people who are "over" standard-chart weights.The new "acceptable" weight chart says the same thing: For people past 35, the upper limits are extended by about 10 pounds, and the guidelines themselves warn against excessive leanness.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
A white shirt chases the blues away.Ask any man.A quick shower, shave and pristine shirt fresh from the laundry and he's ready to tackle the world. No compromises, no gray areas with white. Even laundry products which promise to keep white at its brightest echo that note of optimism -- Cheer, Bold, Fresh Start, Yes.Yes! The one positive step women can take now to give the wardrobe a jolt is to invest in a white shirt. Not an ordinary oxford, but a top that makes dramatic use of traditional masculine details.
FEATURES
By Amy Spindler and Amy Spindler,New York Times News Service | January 6, 1994
Todd Oldham's spring runway show felt like an epiphany, a moment where shards of his ideas from the past, of mirrors, gilt and decorated fabrics, fell away to reveal the talent beneath.Surreal, nostalgic and futuristic, that show signaled that Mr. Oldham was ready to step forward.That step will be taken this year. Mr. Oldham will be the latest artist in residence on Wooster Street in March, when he moves his offices and showroom to SoHo. He is looking for boutique space on the street as well.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 20, 1996
I am 32 and have a job as a salesman with a software company. My problem is my girlfriend. She nags me constantly about the way I dress.She is ambitious for me and says I'll never be promoted because I dress too conservatively. She says there's a revolution going on in menswear and I should get with it.I can't imagine facing clients without a tie. Don't I need a suit for my clients to take me seriously?Your girlfriend is right, at least about the revolution going on in menswear.For advice I turned to David Chu, the designer at the New York menswear company Nautica.
NEWS
By Nancy Keen Roche | January 7, 1993
EVERY Sunday I wind our tall case clock.It is an eight-day clock, which means that the mechanism that drives the clock needs winding once a week. Before I wind the clock, I open the glass door which protects the face. Then, by inserting a brass key into a lock framed by an ivory escutcheon, I unlock the clock's wooden waist. The waist houses lead weights the size of grenades, suspended on gleaming filaments of brass chains.By the force of gravity, the weights drive the gears which turn the hands.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | October 27, 2009
For Chris Mason-Hale, healing comes in very small stages, sometimes so small he can't even see them. Since suffering a paralyzing spinal cord injury in a Western Tech football game 14 months ago, he has come a long way. But progress is excruciatingly slow for a former star linebacker who cannot walk. The 17-year-old steadily improved in the months just after the accident - a routine tackle that snapped his neck back, breaking the C-5 vertebra and bruising his spinal cord. He kept improving during inpatient rehabilitation at Kennedy Krieger Institute from January to March.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 23, 2006
Maybe Rogue Pictures delayed the release of Waist Deep until the weekend after Father's Day out of respect for the holiday. It's a paean to fatherly love, and a pain to movie-lovers. Even the movie's hook is crude: Freedomland without the twist. Thugs jack the car of single father, ex-gangbanger and ex-con O2 (Tyrese Gibson) while his son Junior (H. Hunter Hall) lies asleep in the back seat. Astoundingly, O2 has won a job as a security guard with a gun. Since he takes it out of the workplace and uses it to kill two of the carjackers, he can't go to the police.
NEWS
BY SHARI ROAN and BY SHARI ROAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 28, 2006
A little paunch is just no good with a Speedo or bikini. Health-wise, it's none too pretty either. That bulge is the outward sign of a deeper problem: visceral fat, a kind of biological monstrosity that, in excess, wreaks havoc on the body, increasing the risk for heart disease, diabetes, possibly even dementia and some types of cancer. Lying deep inside the body, wrapping around the liver and other major organs, visceral fat acts like a kind of organ itself - spewing out bad hormones and squashing the production of good ones.
NEWS
By Pamela Sitt and Pamela Sitt,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 18, 2004
The chick flick of the moment, Julia Roberts' Mona Lisa Smile, is resplendent with details befitting a proper lady: red lips, pearls, gloves and a sleek silhouette. In this case, the lady is a 1950s Wellesley Girl -- but one need only look to fashion runways, contemporary magazines and well-heeled city streets to realize that a modern-day version of the Wellesley Girl has marched into mainstream fashion. We asked Mona Lisa Smile costume designer Michael Dennison, the man who dressed a cast including Julia Stiles, Kirsten Dunst and Maggie Gyllenhaal, about how to bring 1950s style into modern day. What is the look of a Wellesley Girl, circa 1950, and how did you define it?
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
So let's say you ate the ham and the turkey with gravy, the candied sweet potatoes and the mashed, the green bean casserole, buttered green beans, cranberry sauce, glazed carrots, two kinds of stuffing and Brussels sprouts. Then, for the sake of argument, let's say that you slathered some butter on your two dinner rolls, downed a few glasses of soda and a cup of eggnog and tucked into two slices of pie a la mode (pumpkin and pecan), a hunk of homemade cheesecake and a chocolate chip cookie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2003
If avoidable catastrophe inevitably drove societies to correct their weaknesses, there would be precious little work for legislatures and regulators. The tragic truth is that terrible disasters become catalysts of major reform only when some more complex scene has been set and a latent reservoir of public outrage is ready to explode. That is the fascinating story of Triangle: The Fire that Changed America, by David Von Drehle, a reporter for The Washington Post (Atlantic Monthly, 340 pages, $25)
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | December 14, 1993
You can -- and dance your way through the holidays and emerge a New Year's svelte elf, instead of a national statistic, gaining 5 to 7 pounds by Jan. 2. Just follow these basic party do's and don'ts:* DON'T skip meals. Saving up calories all day long to cover evening indulgences is a recipe for diet disaster. Arriving famished, then adding alcohol, sets you up for a binge.* DO eat responsible meals all day long. You might eat a slightly lighter breakfast and lunch, but do eat. Indulge in a leafy green salad with fat-free dressing before you leave home.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | December 30, 2001
NEW YORK -- Corsets to create 17-inch waists, weighted brass coils to elongate the neck and shoes so tiny a woman would have to bind her feet for years to twist the toes down and inward to slip into the silken footwear. These items sound at once terrifying, perverse and more than a tad painful. Yet, puzzling as they are as clothing choices, they've been the necessary fashion statements at different times. Now the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute has assembled them for an exhibit to showcase the changing concepts of female beauty throughout history and the extremes to which we have gone to achieve them.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | December 30, 2001
NEW YORK -- Corsets to create 17-inch waists, weighted brass coils to elongate the neck and shoes so tiny a woman would have to bind her feet for years to twist the toes down and inward to slip into the silken footwear. These items sound at once terrifying, perverse and more than a tad painful. Yet, puzzling as they are as clothing choices, they've been the necessary fashion statements at different times. Now the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute has assembled them for an exhibit to showcase the changing concepts of female beauty throughout history and the extremes to which we have gone to achieve them.
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