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By John Steadman | February 15, 1998
Almost 40 years of pep rallies, touchdowns and games won and lost fulfilling the all-encompassing role of teacher, tactician, surrogate father, counselor, disciplinarian and cheerleader. August Waibel has been all of that. There were those repetitive practices into the darkness of evening and, if need be, taking a moment, while on the way to the locker room, to patiently explain to an ambitious father why his son was still running with the second team.A pure package of sensitivity and sincerity.
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NEWS
December 16, 2007
Offensive Player Dan Griffin North Harford In his third year as starting quarterback, the 6-foot, 180-pound senior smoothly ran the team's triple-option offense and proved to be effective in several ways. Griffin ran for 840 yards on 132 carries and scored 23 touchdowns to help North Harford (10-2) win its first state playoff game in school history. Griffin made himself more versatile by completing 70 of 119 passes for 1,121 yards and three touchdowns. He finished with 1,961 yards of total offense.
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SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
Augie Waibel, the no-nonsense football coach who led Poly's powerhouse teams to 14 conference titles and turned out such NFL players as Antonio Freeman and Mike Pitts, was found dead yesterday in front of a farmhouse in northern Baltimore County. He was 67. In 35 seasons - four at Edmondson and 31 at Poly - Waibel's teams won 280 games, which was second among the state's active high school coaches when he retired in 1997. Only four of his teams finished the season without a winning record.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,Special to the Sun | September 29, 2007
Joppatowne could have crumbled under the weight of the problems it faced heading into last night's game with unbeaten North Harford. Instead, the Mariners used them for inspiration to pull out a tough victory. Starting quarterback C.J. Townes had to sit out, and Ben Tucker was forced to start his first varsity game. Tucker played well and received help from Tavon Henley and Marquis Horsey, as each ran for a touchdown. Kelvin Harris had two interceptions to help the Joppatowne defense control visiting North Harford and hold on for a 14-11 victory.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 22, 2001
Augie Waibel, who coached football at Poly for 31 years, will be memorialized with an annual scholarship in his name and the naming of the August Waibel Athletic Center. The dedication of the center is scheduled for next fall. The Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, the Poly Alumni Association and the BPI Foundation are coordinating the effort. Waibel died of a heart attack Jan. 6 at age 67. In 35 seasons (four at Edmondson) before he retired in 1997, Waibel's teams won 280 games in 35 seasons.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
Poly's Augie Waibel, 63, the area's winningest high school football coach, said Tuesday that he will retire after the 1997 season.Waibel, who expects John Hammond to inherit his post and longtime assistant Bucky Kimmett to stay on as an assistant, plans to hold a formal meeting with his players Tuesday to announce "that this is going to be my last year."I want to get it out of the way so it doesn't interfere too much with my season and so the kids can enjoy it," said Waibel, a Carney resident.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
Augie Waibel was eulogized yesterday as a man who influenced many lives with his dedication, humility and honesty. Hundreds of his coaching colleagues, former players and friends congregated at his funeral Mass at St. Ursula Catholic Church in Parkville to pay their final respects to the former Poly football coach, who died Saturday in northern Baltimore County after suffering a massive heart attack. Green Bay Packers wide receiver Antonio Freeman, the most recent Waibel protege to play in the NFL, flew in from Florida for the 1 1/2 -hour service presided over by the Rev. Joe Bonadio, a close friend of the Waibel family.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1997
There were tears in Augie Waibel's eyes as the legendary Poly coach walked toward the locker room having lost the last game of his 35-year career, 20-13, to visiting Dunbar in yesterday's Class 2A state semifinal game.And though the Dunbar players danced on the field in celebration, there were mixed emotions all about the Poly football field.Obie Barnes, 49, had just watched his son, Dunbar receiver Chris Barnes, "just about end the career of the man whose career I helped to start" as a lineman at Edmondson.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
After nearly 40 years of coaching experience, Augie Waibel admits he should have known better.But the Poly football and lacrosse coach also admits being a stubborn man, which not only made him a three-sport athlete and an excellent teacher, but also is the main reason it hurts so much lately just to blow his nose.The 59-year-old Carney resident is paying the price for violating one of his most important rules: Always warm up before engaging in any strenuous exercise."We were moving this seven-man blocking sled last Thursday, and you just don't jump into something like that," said Waibel, describing a recent back injury.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 28, 2001
BACK IN THE BAD days - when the Baltimore Ravens were on that five-game, touchdownless skid where they lost three straight games, and few of us, no matter what we claim now, figured they'd make the playoffs, much less the Super Bowl - I mused to myself: "Why don't the Ravens make Augie Waibel their offensive coordinator?" I was joking, of course. A little. Today, Baltimoreans will watch the Ravens either beat the New York Giants to become Super Bowl champs or lose and be mere runners-up.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,Special To The Sun | September 15, 2007
Bill Waibel isn't always easy to please, but the first thing the Joppatowne coach did after last night's game with Havre de Grace was tell his Mariners to give themselves a round of applause. Joppatowne played the kind of low-mistake, big-play game that Waibel likes. Kevin Harris returned an interception for a 22-yard touchdown, and Ben Tucker added a 4-yard scoring run to help the host Mariners pull out a 16-6 victory over Havre de Grace in an Upper Chesapeake Bay Athletic Conference game.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 13, 2007
To accommodate corporate jets migrating away from major airports to regional ones, Carroll County commissioners adopted a contentious plan yesterday to build a new, expanded runway at the Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster. The $56 million plan calls for relocating and extending the airport's main runway, giving larger jets the necessary space to take off with full tanks of fuel and more passengers. The plan would rebuild the 5,100-foot runway 250 feet west and 600 feet north of its present location.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,Special to The Sun | November 19, 2006
Joppatowne quarterback C.J. Townes took the snap, moved left, faked a pitchout and cut sharply to his right before running for an 18-yard touchdown in the first quarter against Fallston last month. That play gave the Mariners an early lead in an eventual 21-0 victory and became a turning point in their season. Townes said that touchdown showed his teammates that they could trust him as their starting quarterback. Coach Bill Waibel had given him the job a few days before that game, the team's sixth, after making several quarterback changes while Joppatowne struggled to a 3-2 start.
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2005
Joppatowne coach Bill Waibel watched visiting Potomac celebrate moments after the Wolverines defeated his team in Friday's Class 2A state semifinal. When asked about the Prince George's County's team's talent, Waibel gave a grim smile. "That's the fastest team I've ever coached against," Waibel said after the Mariners' 14-7 loss. Potomac ended Joppatowne's season with that speed and quickness, controlling play on both sides of the ball and stopping Joppatowne's bid for a third straight trip to a state title game.
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2005
While working out in Bill Waibel's weight-training class last spring, David Dudley repeatedly told the Joppatowne football coach not to worry about losing his starting backfield. "I just wanted to make sure [he knew]," Dudley said. "I just told Coach that I'm going to step up to the challenge. I told him, `You don't have to worry about anything.' Coach takes me as a joke sometimes. He'd say, `We'll see,' and, `We hope you bring your "A" game.' " Dudley wasted little time backing up his words with action.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,special to the sun | September 21, 2005
Having lost several key players from last season's state finalist team, Joppatowne football coach Bill Waibel said during preseason workouts that he was worried about how his offense would come together. David Dudley and the Joppatowne running game have helped Waibel relax. Dudley ran for a school-record 383 yards on 35 carries and scored three touchdowns to help Joppatowne roll to a 35-20 victory over Havre de Grace last Friday. The Mariners ran right over the Warriors, gaining 508 yards rushing.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 1995
Facing a third-and-goal and trailing by two points with one minute left, Poly coach Augie Waibel wanted to call a play-action pass.But that choice presented some problems. A first-half downpour had turned the Forest Park field into a quagmire. The rain had picked up again, making the field even more slippery, but Waibel didn't waver."I never doubted it," he said.Poly quarterback Dustin Jones and running back Willie Hudson then made the choice look good.Jones softly tossed an 8-yard touchdown pass to Hudson with 52 seconds left to give No. 14 Poly a come-from-behind 28-22 victory over Forest Park in a Baltimore City 2A League game yesterday.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
There's a new Poly football coach, and his name is John Hammond.And Hammond's Engineers have a different look.Out is the offense of former coach Augie Waibel, known for 35 seasons of grinding opponents into submission with his four basic running plays -- guts, trap, blast and counter. In is Hammond's multiple-set format, which "will be more wide-open,expansive and tries to finesse you and stretch you out," the coach said.An assistant to Waibel for three years before taking over this season, Hammond has even gone to orange helmets, replacing the traditional white ones that had a blue stripe down the middle.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | December 4, 2004
Class 2A state championship No. 1 Hereford (13-0) vs. Potomac-Prince George's (13-0) Time: 11 a.m. Where: M&T Bank Stadium Outlook: The coaches have seen each other's teams five times each. Hereford's Steve Turnbaugh has visited the Wolverines' stadium so often, he jokes about how the grandmother of Potomac WR Eric Westbrooks started giving him homemade carrot cake as soon as he arrived. Potomac coach Eric Knight, meanwhile, grew accustomed to eating the pit beef from the concession stand at Hereford's field.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
Joppatowne's Bill Waibel often asks himself a question before calling an offensive play. What would his father do? The first-year Mariners' head coach is the son of the late Augie Waibel, whose adherence to a power running game made him a local legend. Let an opposing coach describe how the son is like the father. "Just come out and smack you in the mouth," said Forest Park coach Obie Barnes, who played for the elder Waibel at Edmondson. "It's the same style Augie used." As a nine-year assistant to Greg Komondor, Bill Waibel, 41, modeled Joppatowne's offense after those his father led at Poly and Edmondson "To some degree as a coach, you teach as you were taught.
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