Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWahlberg
IN THE NEWS

Wahlberg

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 23, 2007
Mark Wahlberg proved himself a dynamo as a motormouth in The Departed, so it's disappointing to see him play the strong silent type in Shooter. Who ever thought that type was so American, anyway? From Davy Crockett to Crockett and Tubbs it's been hard to get American heroes to shut up. What was funny and charming about Gary Cooper in his early Western roles was that you could see his mind searching for more words than he knew how to pronounce and more thoughts than he could articulate. But Bob Lee Swagger is a man of no adjectives and few verbs or nouns.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
Mark Wahlberg has been crying uncle about the Dada-esque Saturday Night Live routine "Mark Wahlberg Talks to Animals." But SNL star Andy Samberg's imitation of Marky Mark as Barky Bark (conversing to "the Donkey Bunch") is vastly more amusing than Wahlberg's latest action vehicle. This gifted, rough-edged star has no one to blame except himself for appearing in Max Payne. He may not talk to animals here, but he does growl like a wounded bear and stare open-mouthed at soldier angels. Although they're supposed to be the Valkyrie of Norse lore, they look like clay dolls baked in a kiln and animated by cartoonists who are all thumbs.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
Mark Wahlberg has been crying uncle about the Dada-esque Saturday Night Live routine "Mark Wahlberg Talks to Animals." But SNL star Andy Samberg's imitation of Marky Mark as Barky Bark (conversing to "the Donkey Bunch") is vastly more amusing than Wahlberg's latest action vehicle. This gifted, rough-edged star has no one to blame except himself for appearing in Max Payne. He may not talk to animals here, but he does growl like a wounded bear and stare open-mouthed at soldier angels. Although they're supposed to be the Valkyrie of Norse lore, they look like clay dolls baked in a kiln and animated by cartoonists who are all thumbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2008
Night of Thunder by Stephen Hunter Simon & Schuster / 304 pages / $26 With his white hair and unsteady gait, 63-year-old Bob Lee Swagger seems like a bumbling old man, certainly no match for the armed robbers and murderers he finds in NASCAR country. But in Stephen Hunter's latest thriller, Night of Thunder (in stores Sept. 23), nothing is what it seems. Known for his cinematic language, action-packed suspense and multifaceted characters, Hunter delivers all three in his latest. Formerly of The Baltimore Sun, Hunter, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post film critic and best-selling author, writes page-turners pumped with muscular verbs as in "It was Iron Mountain, and 421 slashed crookedly up its angry hump."
NEWS
December 14, 2003
On December 11, 2003, ALICE HAAS; (nee Stolar); beloved wife of the late Leo Haas; beloved mother of Robert Haas of Silver Spring, MD, and Susan Wahlberg of Columbia, MD; devoted mother-in-law of Melvyn Wahlberg; loving grandmother of Jennifer and Christopher Byrne, Daniel and Jodi Wahlberg, loving great-grandmother of Hannah Brooke Wahlberg. Services were held at SOL LEVINSON & BROS, INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt Wilson Lane, on Friday, December 12 at 1 P.M. Interment Chevra Ahavas Chesed Cemetery, Randallstown.
FEATURES
August 17, 2007
87 Maureen O'Hara Actress 64 Robert De Niro Actor 49 Belinda Carlisle Singer 47 Sean Penn Actor 38 Donnie Wahlberg Actor/singer
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 9, 1994
So you think you're pretty hip because you never liked New Kids on the Block tunes like "Tonight"?Big deal. Even Donnie Wahlberg didn't like that song -- and he is one of the New Kids.In fact, Wahlberg readily admits that his heart wasn't in a lot of what producer Maurice Starr wrote for the New Kids. "We used to do songs with Maurice, and they weren't really songs that we liked," he says, over the phone from Boston. "It got to a point on some records where some of us wouldn't even bother going to the studio to do anything on the songs, because we didn't like them."
NEWS
October 22, 2003
On Tuesday, October 21, 2003, NORTON DAHNE, beloved husband of Marcia E. Dahne (nee Eisner); loving father of Ellen D. Levin of Virginia and Dr. Edward G. Dahne of Randallstown, MD; dear father-in-law of Dr. Arnold Levin and Dr. Marlene Dahne; adored brother of Marvin Dahne and the late Ralph Dahne, Dorothy Alperstein, Bertha Fink, Sylvia J. Cardin and Naomi Fruman; loving grandfather of Jodi L. and Dan Wahlberg, Dr. Joshua and Rebecca Levin, Robyn Levin,...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 7, 2001
Rock Star is an inept moral fable about glad rags and sad riches. Set in the mid-'80s, it centers on a Pittsburgh heavy metal fan (Mark Wahlberg) who catapults to black-leather Olympus as the lead singer for Steel Dragon, the group imitated by his cover band. Wahlberg's character loves the bellowing music of Steel Dragon; his bandmates play along simply to expand their audience. When the cover band boots him because of his perfectionism, his girlfriend (Jennifer Aniston), the band's manager, says that all the talent has left the room.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Writer-director James Gray sets We Own the Night in 1988. The title comes from the late-'80s motto of the NYPD's street- crimes unit, and a key location is a garish dance club where coke flows like Coke. But at heart, Gray wants to make the best American movie of 1958. This hoary melodrama about father and son New York City policemen (Robert Duvall and Mark Wahlberg) and the black-sheep, club-manager brother (Joaquin Phoenix) who helps them defeat the Russian mob is a throwback to the time when New York-based directors, bred on live TV, weren't shy or all that skillful about mixing moral earnestness with urban grit and method-acting anguish.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2008
Plants go on the attack against humans who are so banal they might as well be vegetables. That's all that happens in M. Night Shyamalan's The Happening, a horror thriller starring Mark Wahlberg as a Philadelphia high school science teacher and Zooey Deschanel as his wife. Shyamalan has said he wanted to create the best B-movie ever made, but it fails to be the best C movie of the month. (Stuck or Zohan are better C movies.) As the couple flee deep into the Pennsylvania countryside to escape a plague spread by airborne toxins, where are all the cheap thrills and artful dodges?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Writer-director James Gray sets We Own the Night in 1988. The title comes from the late-'80s motto of the NYPD's street- crimes unit, and a key location is a garish dance club where coke flows like Coke. But at heart, Gray wants to make the best American movie of 1958. This hoary melodrama about father and son New York City policemen (Robert Duvall and Mark Wahlberg) and the black-sheep, club-manager brother (Joaquin Phoenix) who helps them defeat the Russian mob is a throwback to the time when New York-based directors, bred on live TV, weren't shy or all that skillful about mixing moral earnestness with urban grit and method-acting anguish.
FEATURES
August 17, 2007
87 Maureen O'Hara Actress 64 Robert De Niro Actor 49 Belinda Carlisle Singer 47 Sean Penn Actor 38 Donnie Wahlberg Actor/singer
NEWS
By Weyman Swagger and Weyman Swagger,Sun Reporter | April 1, 2007
Does my name sound familiar? It may be because you've heard about Shooter, a new film starring Mark Wahlberg as former Marine sniper Bob Lee Swagger. The movie is based on Stephen Hunter's novel, Point of Impact in which Steve, my former Sun colleague and shooting buddy, gave the hero my surname. In fact, it's one of six Hunter novels featuring the character Bob Lee Swagger or his extended family. But let's get a few things straight. I don't look like Mark Wahlberg; I'm much more handsome.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 23, 2007
Mark Wahlberg proved himself a dynamo as a motormouth in The Departed, so it's disappointing to see him play the strong silent type in Shooter. Who ever thought that type was so American, anyway? From Davy Crockett to Crockett and Tubbs it's been hard to get American heroes to shut up. What was funny and charming about Gary Cooper in his early Western roles was that you could see his mind searching for more words than he knew how to pronounce and more thoughts than he could articulate. But Bob Lee Swagger is a man of no adjectives and few verbs or nouns.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | March 13, 2007
The sun had barely risen and there was still ice on the ground when we slipped into the overly warm cocoon of a Town Car that whisked us to BWI. Hours later, a second Town Car, this one chilled to champagne levels, silkily took over, delivering us from the Los Angeles airport to a hotel in Beverly Hills. "Pretty woman ... " the driver purred, as he opened my door. I'm trying to work up a modest blush and demurral when he finishes his sentence: " ... was filmed here." Ah, Hollywood - so easy to fall under its spell, and so quick for reality to splash you right out of it. Every Hollywood story has a backstory.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 12, 1996
"Fear" is efficient but limited. It's fundamentally an expression of every baby-boomer father's worst nightmare: His perfect princess of a teen-age daughter is swept up by a dark, beautiful and sexy stranger, and the father has to determine if there's real danger here or if only secret Freudian jealousies and fears of replacement are being twitted.Of course in the world of crass thrillers, there has to be real danger so the more interesting of the two possibilities is soon abandoned. Mark Wahlberg plays a buff Seattle club cruiser who picks up bad girl wannabe Reese Witherspoon and comes on as Mr. Perfect to her father, wealthy architect William Petersen.
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | March 24, 1996
Fame wouldn't be as potent a drug without the shiny, happy art of magazine photography. The images by such pop photographers as Annie Leibovitz, Herb Ritts and Matthew Rolston empower slick magazines to make actors into idols, to elevate a pout into an attitude, to turn greasy, clumpy hair into the rage. With their styles and colors and poses and props, these pictures help to define American cultural moments, not to mention sell a few products.Performers such as Demi Moore, Madonna, Cindy Crawford and Marky Mark have benefited from thecovers, Ms. Moore's reputation might be more as a working actress and box-office draw, and less as a movie star.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 6, 2006
Set in the lower depths and shiny high-rises of a Boston where the church lacks the moral stature to control bingo, The Departed tells a tale of the bad luck of the Irish with black humor, zest and cumulative kapow that take off the top of your head. With The Departed, Martin Scorsese and his screenwriter, William Monahan, have turned the Hong Kong thriller Infernal Affairs into a low-down and majestic cops-and-crooks epic. Far better than Mystic River, it brings to the screen the compass-less Beantown of deteriorating parishes and drifting good-bad guys.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,NEWSDAY | October 14, 2004
You'd think that if they could get Bibles in every hotel room, somebody could figure out how to get dictionaries in all of them, too. Consider your itinerant writer in Toronto, synapses clogged by a surfeit of films competing for his attention at that city's annual film festival last month. Among these items is I (heart) Huckabees, David O. Russell's first feature in five years, which was set loose last week in some cities and opens here tomorrow. Trying to describe the movie to readers, your traveling reporter struggles for the right word.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.