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By Karin Remesch | July 9, 1998
Join members of the Frederick Scottish Association to celebrate the life of Susanna Beatty, Frederick County's first woman pioneer, with a wagon train and Scottish Festival this weekend at the Beatty-Cramer House, the oldest extant home in Frederick County.During the event, a wagon train re-creating Susanna Beatty's journey from the Hudson Valley of New York in 1732 will wind through northern Frederick Country with stops in Emmitsburg and Thurmont en route to the Beatty-Cramer House. The wagon train will camp at the Loy Station Covered Bridge (pictured)
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 1, 2003
Creative Alliance's "Baltimore Movie Museum" film series, a regular Wednesday night event programmed by George Figgs and Alana Roth, this week double-bills Howard Hawks' 1948 Red River and Nicholas Ray's 1954 Johnny Guitar under the title "Closet Hollywood." Ray's movie is a camp Western classic, but in Hawks' picture homosexual subtext is one element of an epic canvas. The key "gay" scene in Red River comes when John Ireland's gunslinger, after joining John Wayne's cattle drive, challenges Wayne's surrogate son and top lieutenant, Montgomery Clift, to a shooting contest.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
Bridegroom Rex Penick handled the reins of the first covere wagon, as his father-in-law-to-be, Eddie LaMott, sat beside him, cradling a shotgun."I'm so proud to be here, just like Minnie Pearl," the bridegroom said to a friend as the lead wagon of the bridal wagon train turned the corner at Center Street and Gist Road in Westminster.Yesterday, Terri Gibson and Rex Penick, two wagon train aficionados from Westminster, were married while about 150 friends and family circled their wagons around them at the town's Ag Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and By John Rivera,Sun Staff | June 15, 2003
American Massacre: The Tragedy at Mountain Meadows, September 1857, by Sally Denton. Knopf. 336 pages. $26.95. Since the horrific events on that crisp autumn day in 2001, the date Sept. 11 has become a shorthand for untold tragedy. But that date on the calendar was made infamous 144 years earlier, when a group of pioneers heading west in a wagon train from Alabama to California was slaughtered in a bucolic meadow in southern Utah. The massacre of more than 120 people, men, women and children of the Fancher-Baker party between Sept 7 and 11, 1857, was, until the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City, the largest mass murder perpetrated on American soil.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | May 13, 1993
Imagine wandering the frontier, horses to your left, horses to your right, covered wagons ahead and behind.Now imagine it in the 1990s.Carolyn Stoner and Kathie Warner, sisters from Keymar, participate in wagon trains about eight times a year.Mrs. Stoner acquired her first horse 19 years ago. She has been taking part in wagon trains for the past 10 years. Mrs. Warner got involved eight years ago.Both credit their father, 82-year-old Glenn Stambaugh, as "the one who really got us started."Mrs.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 5, 1992
At times, the rhythm of horse's hoofs clip-clopping and wagon wheels creaking along rural back roads in Carroll County take Larry Close and his friends to a gentler era."We just want to slow down the pace of life a bit," explained Mr. Close, one of about 75 people who rode a wagon train through northwestern Carroll over the weekend. "It's a chance to get out of the rat race."Indeed, on a glorious fall day, Mr. Close and his friends escaped the bustle of life in the late 20th century to ride a wagon train along less-traveled roads through pockets of villages such as Bear Run, Mayberry and Pleasant Valley.
NEWS
November 19, 1990
Harry Lauter, 76, a veteran cowboy actor in television westerns, died Oct. 30 of heart failure at his home in Ojai, Calif. A regular black hat in westerns, Mr. Lauter appeared in such series as "Wagon Train," "Rawhide," "Gunsmoke," "Bonanza" and "Wyatt Earp." He also had two series of his own: "Waterfront," in 1954, and "Tales of the Texas Rangers," from 1955 to 1959.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
Richard Norris, who directed, produced and wrote numerous movie and television Westerns under the name of Richard Bartlett during a 33-year Hollywood career, died of complications apparently related to diabetes at Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace on Saturday. He was 70 years old.His films received scant attention, but his television credits included such blockbusters as "Bonanza," "Wagon Train" and "77 Sunset Strip."The Aberdeen resident directed many of the leading stars of the 1950s and 1960s, including Eddie Albert, Bette Davis, David Jannsen, and Ronald Reagan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and By John Rivera,Sun Staff | June 15, 2003
American Massacre: The Tragedy at Mountain Meadows, September 1857, by Sally Denton. Knopf. 336 pages. $26.95. Since the horrific events on that crisp autumn day in 2001, the date Sept. 11 has become a shorthand for untold tragedy. But that date on the calendar was made infamous 144 years earlier, when a group of pioneers heading west in a wagon train from Alabama to California was slaughtered in a bucolic meadow in southern Utah. The massacre of more than 120 people, men, women and children of the Fancher-Baker party between Sept 7 and 11, 1857, was, until the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City, the largest mass murder perpetrated on American soil.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | May 15, 2001
IN 1979, Annapolis filmmaker Patti Obrow White produced "The Wagon Train Trial," a compelling documentary chronicling the stories of four incorrigible teen-agers who make a journey of self-discovery from Arizona, over the Rockies into Denver in horse-drawn covered wagons. It is a bumpy ride for these kids, in more ways than one. Juvenile delinquents who had used up the patience and mercy of the system, and their parents, the teens battle the elements and their own demons for four months.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | May 15, 2001
IN 1979, Annapolis filmmaker Patti Obrow White produced "The Wagon Train Trial," a compelling documentary chronicling the stories of four incorrigible teen-agers who make a journey of self-discovery from Arizona, over the Rockies into Denver in horse-drawn covered wagons. It is a bumpy ride for these kids, in more ways than one. Juvenile delinquents who had used up the patience and mercy of the system, and their parents, the teens battle the elements and their own demons for four months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | July 9, 1998
Join members of the Frederick Scottish Association to celebrate the life of Susanna Beatty, Frederick County's first woman pioneer, with a wagon train and Scottish Festival this weekend at the Beatty-Cramer House, the oldest extant home in Frederick County.During the event, a wagon train re-creating Susanna Beatty's journey from the Hudson Valley of New York in 1732 will wind through northern Frederick Country with stops in Emmitsburg and Thurmont en route to the Beatty-Cramer House. The wagon train will camp at the Loy Station Covered Bridge (pictured)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
I don't remember exactly what it was that killed the comedian John Candy last year, but "Wagons East!" -- Candy's last film -- might have been at least partly responsible. This is a dog of a movie. Wait a minute -- it's even worse than that: It's a dog of a shaggy dog movie. This comedy is not only awful, its basic material meanders so mindlessly that you wonder what the joke is supposed to be. "Wagons East!" has about as much shape as Candy's potato sack of a body.As a woman behind me said at the preview I attended: "Is this a movie?"
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
Richard Norris, who directed, produced and wrote numerous movie and television Westerns under the name of Richard Bartlett during a 33-year Hollywood career, died of complications apparently related to diabetes at Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace on Saturday. He was 70 years old.His films received scant attention, but his television credits included such blockbusters as "Bonanza," "Wagon Train" and "77 Sunset Strip."The Aberdeen resident directed many of the leading stars of the 1950s and 1960s, including Eddie Albert, Bette Davis, David Jannsen, and Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
Bridegroom Rex Penick handled the reins of the first covere wagon, as his father-in-law-to-be, Eddie LaMott, sat beside him, cradling a shotgun."I'm so proud to be here, just like Minnie Pearl," the bridegroom said to a friend as the lead wagon of the bridal wagon train turned the corner at Center Street and Gist Road in Westminster.Yesterday, Terri Gibson and Rex Penick, two wagon train aficionados from Westminster, were married while about 150 friends and family circled their wagons around them at the town's Ag Center.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | May 13, 1993
Imagine wandering the frontier, horses to your left, horses to your right, covered wagons ahead and behind.Now imagine it in the 1990s.Carolyn Stoner and Kathie Warner, sisters from Keymar, participate in wagon trains about eight times a year.Mrs. Stoner acquired her first horse 19 years ago. She has been taking part in wagon trains for the past 10 years. Mrs. Warner got involved eight years ago.Both credit their father, 82-year-old Glenn Stambaugh, as "the one who really got us started."Mrs.
FEATURES
May 10, 1992
The National Pike Festival celebrates the nation's first federally funded interstate highway linking the East to the Western frontier. The original festival began 19 years ago in Washington County, Pa., during the nation's bicentennial.Today, the festival stretches more than 300 miles from Pennsylvania, through parts of Maryland, West Virginia and into Eastern Ohio. It is billed "the longest festival in the world," and celebrations will be held on weekends through the end of May. In Maryland the festival will take place Saturday and next Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
I don't remember exactly what it was that killed the comedian John Candy last year, but "Wagons East!" -- Candy's last film -- might have been at least partly responsible. This is a dog of a movie. Wait a minute -- it's even worse than that: It's a dog of a shaggy dog movie. This comedy is not only awful, its basic material meanders so mindlessly that you wonder what the joke is supposed to be. "Wagons East!" has about as much shape as Candy's potato sack of a body.As a woman behind me said at the preview I attended: "Is this a movie?"
NEWS
By The Kansas City Star | May 3, 1993
Westmoreland, Kan. -- The message is brief, revealing perhaps more about the living than the dead."Here lies an early traveler who lost his life in quest of riches in the west."No name. No date on this grave marker near Vermillion Creek just south of Westmoreland.A good guess, however, would be that the traveler died in 1849. And that would lead to a reasonably accurate surmise that cholera was the killer.The reference to "riches" sounds a little disapproving, maybe even smug. The quest might have been for California gold or it could mean the bounty of Oregon.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 5, 1992
At times, the rhythm of horse's hoofs clip-clopping and wagon wheels creaking along rural back roads in Carroll County take Larry Close and his friends to a gentler era."We just want to slow down the pace of life a bit," explained Mr. Close, one of about 75 people who rode a wagon train through northwestern Carroll over the weekend. "It's a chance to get out of the rat race."Indeed, on a glorious fall day, Mr. Close and his friends escaped the bustle of life in the late 20th century to ride a wagon train along less-traveled roads through pockets of villages such as Bear Run, Mayberry and Pleasant Valley.
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