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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Working at $4.25 an hour for a company that cleans public schools in Baltimore, Keith Mahone is puzzled that there should be argument over President Clinton's proposal to raise the minimum wage."
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
After months of negotiations, one strike and the threat of another, and intervention from the governor, Johns Hopkins Hospital and 2,000 service workers reached a tentative labor agreement early Tuesday that some said could become an "important benchmark" for the health care industry. The deal, which is to be submitted to the workers for a vote, came after seven hours of negotiations that ended at 2 a.m. It would affect housekeepers, cooks, janitors, surgical technicians and others.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- An increase in the federal minimum wage, which seemed to be heading toward passage as recently as last month, has been thrown into jeopardy with the departure of Bob Dole from the Senate, say senior Clinton administration officials.Dole, the Republican leader before he left the Senate to focus on his presidential campaign, opposed the Democrats' proposal to increase the minimum wage to $5.15 an hour from $4.25, but in late May he said he would be willing to move ahead with a vote.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Vowing to strengthen Maryland's middle class, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Monday that will gradually raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour — his No. 1 legislative priority for the last of his eight years in office. The measure was among more than 200 bills the governor signed into law at a State House ceremony. Others included a ban on the sale of most grain alcohol, reforms to Baltimore's liquor board and expansion of the city's needle-exchange program to prevent AIDS.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After months of partisan debate, the Senate will vote today on a hotly disputed bill to boost the minimum wage by 90 cents an hour.But before the showdown vote, senators will pass judgment on a Republican-backed amendment, sponsored by Missouri Sen. Christopher S. Bond, that President Clinton has denounced as a "poison pill."Clinton said its adoption would trigger his veto, a threat reiterated yesterday by Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich, who called the amendment "mean spirited" and said it was meant to deny the wage increase to millions of low-income workers.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,Los ANgeles Times | January 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House's Democratic majority, exercising its new political power, approved yesterday the first increase in the federal minimum wage in a decade - from $5.15 to $7.25 an hour over two years. The measure heads to the Senate, where it is likely to be coupled with tax breaks for small businesses to win Republican votes in the narrowly divided chamber and secure President Bush's signature. The minimum wage has been unchanged since 1997, the longest period without a raise since the first minimum wage was enacted in 1938.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On the eve of a crucial Senate vote to raise the federal minimum wage for millions of workers, organized labor and business groups are waging an all-out lobbying campaign to influence the outcome.Over the holiday weekend, the AFL-CIO spent nearly $100,000 for 60-second radio ads directed at senators in at least four states. Local union members also began calling senators in about 10 states, urging the same message: Approve an increase in the hourly wage to $5.15 from $4.25 and defeat a Republican amendment that Democrats say will gut the first rise in six years.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 3, 2006
Republicans can squawk all they like, but that's an effective move the O'Malley campaign made Tuesday. The Democratic mayor of Baltimore challenged the Republican governor of Maryland to join him in supporting an increase in the federal minimum wage -- without tying the increase to another ridiculous tax break for millionaires. Republicans dismiss this as an election-year ploy by Martin O'Malley to score votes with the working class. Ploy? Supporting decent, living wages for working people is what a Democrat is supposed to do. You can look it up. In Maryland, it wouldn't hurt Republicans to do the same.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Republican-led Senate voted overwhelmingly yesterday to raise the minimum hourly wage by 90 cents over two years, handing an election-year victory to President Clinton and the minority-party Democrats.Twenty-seven Republicans joined the unanimous Democrats to approve the bill by a 74-24 vote.Earlier, five Republicans broke ranks to help Democrats defeat a GOP amendment that would have allowed small businesses to avoid paying the higher wage and would have delayed the wage increase by six months.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval Wednesday to legislation that would raise Maryland's minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10, rejecting a flurry of amendments offered by opponents. The action clears the way for a final House vote on the measure Friday. Votes on amendments indicated that proponents of the increase - a top priority of Gov. Martin O'Malley - have more than enough votes to pass the bill and send it to the Senate. Opponents focused on a controversial provision exempting seasonal amusement parks such as Six Flags in Prince George's County from the wage increase, charging that would create an unfair break for one type of company.
NEWS
Erin Cox and Timothy Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The plan to raise Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour cleared Maryland's Senate Saturday afternoon. Although lawmakers must still work out details on who would be exempted from the hike and how long it would take to implement, compromises reached by key lawmakers and Gov. Martin O'Malley earlier in the week suggest the Senate version will become law. That plan, approved by senators in a 34-13 vote, calls for incrementally raising the...
NEWS
April 2, 2014
How easy it is to rail against the salaries of elected officials. Embedded deeply in the human psyche is the near-certainty that somewhere, somehow the people who hold public office are getting away with unarmed robbery. It's a suspicion that's easy to play on, while proving the reverse — that a taxpayer-financed pay raise might actually be overdue and a worthy investment — is a tough sell under the best of circumstances. And while we can't argue that everyone who holds such positions deserves their pay, what we do know is that the General Assembly Compensation Commission makes a good case for why Maryland's elected leaders ought to be paid more beginning next year.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
About 2,000 service and maintenance workers seeking raises have yet to come to an agreement with Johns Hopkins Hospital. The workers, who are members of labor union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, have threatened to strike beginning April 9 if the hospital does not agree to a wage increase of as much as 40 percent for some employees, though most would get more modest raises. The starting salary of the workers represented by the union ranges from $10.71 to $27.88 per hour, depending on the job, according to Hopkins officials.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
About 2,000 workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital have threatened to strike if the hospital does not agree to a wage increase of as much as 40 percent for some employees. A union representing the hospital's service and maintenance workers, including housekeepers and those who deliver food to patients, requested the increase because it said many of the workers rely on government assistance programs such as food stamps and Medicaid to support their families. The contract with the workers, members of labor union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, was set to expire at midnight Monday, and the two sides continued to negotiate late into the evening.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval Wednesday to legislation that would raise Maryland's minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10, rejecting a flurry of amendments offered by opponents. The action clears the way for a final House vote on the measure Friday. Votes on amendments indicated that proponents of the increase - a top priority of Gov. Martin O'Malley - have more than enough votes to pass the bill and send it to the Senate. Opponents focused on a controversial provision exempting seasonal amusement parks such as Six Flags in Prince George's County from the wage increase, charging that would create an unfair break for one type of company.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed increase in Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10 cleared its first hurdle Monday night as a House committee approved the bill and rejected a proposal to set a different standard for rural areas. The House Economic Matters Committee voted 13-8 to send the measure - with significant changes -- to the full House. Before doing so, it amended the bill to eliminate a provision calling for the minimum wage to be increased automatically to keep pace with inflation after reaching $10.10 on Jan. 2017.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A battle over whether to raise the minimum wage is spilling into congressional races, with the Democratic Party promising to increase the wage as one of its first acts should it win control of Congress. Democrats have crafted a campaign message attacking Republicans for accepting annual cost-of-living increases while denying a raise to 6.6 million low-income workers, who have not seen a minimum wage increase in nine years. The fight heated up yesterday as the Senate rejected a proposal by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, a Massachusetts Democrat, to boost the minimum wage from $5.15 to $7.25 an hour over the next two years.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Despite fierce objections from Republican leaders, the House voted yesterday to raise the federal minimum wage, boosting prospects that the legislation will become law this year.The 281-144 vote, to raise the wage by 90 cents over two years, marked the first time Democrats had pushed a major proposal of their own this far through the Republican-led Congress. Their victory included the rejection of a Republican amendment that would have enabled small businesses to avoid paying new employees the higher minimum wage.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley says he will speak with the secretary of homeland security about a controversial federal program that appears to be deporting an unusually large percentage of immigrants without criminal records from Maryland. O'Malley raised questions about the Secure Communities program last week in a letter to Secretary Jeh Johnson. The two already were scheduled to attend a meeting as part of a gathering of the National Governors Association that began here this week. O'Malley said Friday he hadn't received a response to his letter yet, but added: "I will be meeting with the secretary … and I plan to talk about it. " Under the Secure Communities program, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement generally focuses enforcement efforts on dangerous criminals who are in the country illegally.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
So Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan for the minimum wage hike is welcomed by a majority in The Sun's poll ( "Poll finds support for minimum wage hike ," Feb. 18). No big surprise there. But the governor wants to tie future minimum wage increases to the rate of inflation. That makes sense, right? After all, doesn't every hard working individual get an automatic raise from his employer based on inflation? Oh, wait, I don't. Can I get a show of hands from everyone who does? Anyone? Thought not. In the real world, a raise is given to reward an employee for a job well done or for longevity, not simply "because.
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