Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWag The Dog
IN THE NEWS

Wag The Dog

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 20, 2004
When Barry Levinson's Wag the Dog was released in 1997, it benefited from some extraordinary timing. President Bill Clinton already was busy denying he'd been sexually involved with Paula Jones and had used Arkansas state troopers to both further and help cover up his relations with her. Within weeks of the film's December opening, the Monica Lewinsky scandal would break. And while all this was going on, the president was talking tough on Iraq, threatening the regime of Saddam Hussein with serious consequences if it kept on bullying its neighbors and interfering with U.N. weapons inspectors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | August 19, 2007
He now lives in Connecticut with his wife, Diana, but writer-director-producer Barry Levinson is Baltimore's native son and, in the 25 years since Diner, he's been one of Hollywood's finest. That's why insiders and movie-lovers alike are gleefully anticipating his new independent comedy-drama, What Just Happened?, a "sometimes painfully funny" movie about a Hollywood filmmaker juggling ex-wives and volatile projects. The film features his Wag the Dog star Robert De Niro in the lead role.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CITIC | January 2, 1998
Barry Levinson directed "Wag the Dog" in 29 days, and it shows: This breezy bagatelle of a film moves with the sort of gleeful alacrity that distinguishes movies made for the sheer fun of it.Thanks in large part to its crisp, unfussy tone, "Wag the Dog" never overplays its premise, which is the observation that show business and politics have become cozy to the point of indistinguishability. It simply takes that fact to its logical conclusion, presenting filmgoers with the scenario of a presidential crisis being manipulated by a shadowy campaign apparatchik and a Hollywood master showman.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 20, 2004
When Barry Levinson's Wag the Dog was released in 1997, it benefited from some extraordinary timing. President Bill Clinton already was busy denying he'd been sexually involved with Paula Jones and had used Arkansas state troopers to both further and help cover up his relations with her. Within weeks of the film's December opening, the Monica Lewinsky scandal would break. And while all this was going on, the president was talking tough on Iraq, threatening the regime of Saddam Hussein with serious consequences if it kept on bullying its neighbors and interfering with U.N. weapons inspectors.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
"And what is the moral of our story? Simply this: that the American fiction writer in the middle of the twentieth century has his hands full in trying to understand, describe, and then make credible much of American reality. It stupefies, it sickens, it infuriates, and finally it is even a kind of embarrassment to one's own meager imagination."Philip Roth spoke these words at Stanford University in 1960. This bears repeating: Almost 40 years later, things have not changed much. If anything, real life and fiction seem interchangeable.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 6, 1998
When "Wag the Dog" was nominated for three Golden Globe awards last month, no one was more surprised than the film's director, Barry Levinson."If you're basically setting out to do a satire of politics and show business, and to be cynical, you assume that you'll never be particularly accepted," Levinson said recently, calling from his home in Marin County, Calif. "I think that's historically the case. We put a lot on the table, and it's quite interesting, the reactions we're getting.""Wag the Dog" is a wicked political satire in which Robert De Niro plays Conrad Brean, a Washington spin doctor who manufactures a television war with the help of Hollywood producer Stanley Motss, played by Dustin Hoffman.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 27, 1998
It's so "Wag."The words on all the pundits' lips over the weekend -- aside from "if" and "smear" and "impeachment" -- were "Wag the Dog," Barry Levinson's adaptation of the Larry Beinhart novel that has proved uncannily prescient as the Monica Lewinski saga has unfolded.In the film, the president of the United States -- never shown -- is caught pursuing ex-officio activities with an underage Firefly Girl, just days before his re-election bid. To deflect the voters' attention from the budding scandal, a spin doctor (played by Robert De Niro)
FEATURES
By Frank Rizzo and Frank Rizzo,HARTFORD COURANT | January 6, 1998
NEW YORK -- Anne Heche had no problems answering questions -- about anything.Chatty, vivacious and funny, the 27-year-old actress talked frankly about her romantic relationship with comedian Ellen DeGeneres, her disapproving religious family and her very hot career, including her latest work, "Wag the Dog."It was the journalists who were a little tongue-tied.After all, it's unusual for a Hollywood star to address his or her sexuality without being coy, calculating or closeted."You know what's so funny?"
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 15, 1998
EVERYBODY SAYS we're heading for war, so naturally we headed for the movies to see who wins. "Wag the Dog" was playing. Everybody says it's the blueprint for the coming conflict with Iraq, a transparent excuse to get our minds off the president's trousers, except it's Albania playing the patsy in the movie."
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | September 5, 1999
SAG HARBOR, N.Y. -- "It's a vacation," said the spokesman for Hillary Rodham Clinton as the American royals dropped down on the cash fields called the Hamptons. "She wants to enjoy the scenery and see her friends."That is the language of politics. "Friends" means folks who can pony up, say, $25,000 a couple for a nice dinner and some Clinton vaudeville, featuring the sitting president and his wife standing for election to the U.S. Senate. "Vacation" is the first lady's word for bringing in the sheaves.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | September 5, 1999
SAG HARBOR, N.Y. -- "It's a vacation," said the spokesman for Hillary Rodham Clinton as the American royals dropped down on the cash fields called the Hamptons. "She wants to enjoy the scenery and see her friends."That is the language of politics. "Friends" means folks who can pony up, say, $25,000 a couple for a nice dinner and some Clinton vaudeville, featuring the sitting president and his wife standing for election to the U.S. Senate. "Vacation" is the first lady's word for bringing in the sheaves.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 17, 1998
The dramatic power in the ampersand that connects "Cav & Pag," as Pietro Mascagni's "Cavalleria Rusticana" and Ruggiero Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci" are affectionately known, runs in only one direction. That was my conclusion Thursday evening in the Lyric Opera House when the Baltimore Opera Company reversed the usual order in its staging of this familiar double bill by beginning with "Pagliacci."There is historical precedent for this. The first time these pieces appeared together, the order was Leoncavallo followed by Mascagni.
NEWS
August 27, 1998
Illicit relationship is not the worst thing a president could doI have been trying to think of things that Bill Clinton could have done that would be worse than his dalliance with Monica Lewinsky. This is the scenario I came up with:He could contradict American foreign policy but deny he was doing it. For example, he could declare that we, as a nation, will not negotiate with terrorists, but his administration could secretly try to swap arms for hostages being held by terrorists.To make it worse, he could have money that we take in from that violation of foreign policy and funnel it to Central American anti-government forces, in direct violation of an act of Congress.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
"And what is the moral of our story? Simply this: that the American fiction writer in the middle of the twentieth century has his hands full in trying to understand, describe, and then make credible much of American reality. It stupefies, it sickens, it infuriates, and finally it is even a kind of embarrassment to one's own meager imagination."Philip Roth spoke these words at Stanford University in 1960. This bears repeating: Almost 40 years later, things have not changed much. If anything, real life and fiction seem interchangeable.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1998
Homebuilders came up against county residents opposed to development last night as the Anne Arundel County Council considered a measure that would virtually halt the approval of new residential subdivisions in areas where schools are overcrowded.The bill, introduced at the request of County Executive John G. Gary, would bring county planning policy in line with school board policy by allowing planning officials to consider the capacity of individual elementary, middle or high schools, instead of looking at the capacity of an entire feeder system of schools.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 15, 1998
EVERYBODY SAYS we're heading for war, so naturally we headed for the movies to see who wins. "Wag the Dog" was playing. Everybody says it's the blueprint for the coming conflict with Iraq, a transparent excuse to get our minds off the president's trousers, except it's Albania playing the patsy in the movie."
NEWS
August 27, 1998
Illicit relationship is not the worst thing a president could doI have been trying to think of things that Bill Clinton could have done that would be worse than his dalliance with Monica Lewinsky. This is the scenario I came up with:He could contradict American foreign policy but deny he was doing it. For example, he could declare that we, as a nation, will not negotiate with terrorists, but his administration could secretly try to swap arms for hostages being held by terrorists.To make it worse, he could have money that we take in from that violation of foreign policy and funnel it to Central American anti-government forces, in direct violation of an act of Congress.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | August 19, 2007
He now lives in Connecticut with his wife, Diana, but writer-director-producer Barry Levinson is Baltimore's native son and, in the 25 years since Diner, he's been one of Hollywood's finest. That's why insiders and movie-lovers alike are gleefully anticipating his new independent comedy-drama, What Just Happened?, a "sometimes painfully funny" movie about a Hollywood filmmaker juggling ex-wives and volatile projects. The film features his Wag the Dog star Robert De Niro in the lead role.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 27, 1998
It's so "Wag."The words on all the pundits' lips over the weekend -- aside from "if" and "smear" and "impeachment" -- were "Wag the Dog," Barry Levinson's adaptation of the Larry Beinhart novel that has proved uncannily prescient as the Monica Lewinski saga has unfolded.In the film, the president of the United States -- never shown -- is caught pursuing ex-officio activities with an underage Firefly Girl, just days before his re-election bid. To deflect the voters' attention from the budding scandal, a spin doctor (played by Robert De Niro)
FEATURES
By Frank Rizzo and Frank Rizzo,HARTFORD COURANT | January 6, 1998
NEW YORK -- Anne Heche had no problems answering questions -- about anything.Chatty, vivacious and funny, the 27-year-old actress talked frankly about her romantic relationship with comedian Ellen DeGeneres, her disapproving religious family and her very hot career, including her latest work, "Wag the Dog."It was the journalists who were a little tongue-tied.After all, it's unusual for a Hollywood star to address his or her sexuality without being coy, calculating or closeted."You know what's so funny?"
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.