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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of its Gliadel wafer as a first-time treatment for malignant brain tumors, handing the Baltimore company a major victory after a series of hard-luck rejections that had shaken the faith of investors. The ruling, which came 11 months after the FDA had turned down the company's initial application for expanded use, will allow Guilford to market Gliadel to newly diagnosed brain cancer patients - a population that makes up at least two-thirds of the limited market for the treatment.
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NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2006
Alzada Ross Hill of Silver Spring was looking for a recipe for a vanilla-wafer poundcake that she first made in the late 1960s. June Behm of Baltimore sent in a recipe that had been her mother's originally, and she felt certain it was the recipe Hill was searching for. While it's not technically a poundcake, this is an extremely dense, moist and delicious cake. It also keeps well and perhaps is even better the day after it is baked, when the flavors have blended. Linda Ensign of Salisbury, N.C., is looking for a recipe for salt-rising bread.
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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1996
Boosted by a $20 million payment from its partner in the marketing of a cancer-fighting wafer, Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. yesterday reported quarterly earnings of $13.2 million.On a per-share basis, earnings for the quarter that ended Sept. 30 were $1.29. For the corresponding period last year, the Baltimore-based company reported a loss of $3.4 million, or 65 cents a share."This has been a milestone quarter for Guilford Pharmaceuticals," said Dr. Craig Smith, president and CEO.Guilford Pharmaceuticals' stock closed yesterday at $28, down 75 cents.
NEWS
January 26, 2004
National Guardsmen and their families were honored at the Salute the Troops Dinner 2004 on Tuesday at the BG Thomas B. Baker Armory in Ellicott City. John Linderman, proprietor of Carrabba's Italian Grill in Ellicott City, had the idea for the dinner, which fed about 350 people and was organized by a community group, said Ellicott City resident John Wafer. "It wasn't a formal thing," Wafer said. "We all know each other ... and decided this needed to be done and decided to do it. Most of the people who were involved are Republicans ... [but]
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that it has reacquired rights to sell and retain profits from its top product, a surgically implanted wafer that delivers a chemotherapy drug directly to the site of brain tumors. The Baltimore-based biopharmaceutical company said it bought back commercial rights to the Gliadel wafer from Aventis Pharma by issuing Aventis 300,000 shares of Guilford common stock, worth roughly $7.74 million at yesterday's closing price of $25.81. Guilford said it now has rights to market the drug everywhere except Scandinavia, where Orion Pharma sells it under an agreement with Guilford.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1996
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel yesterday recommended that Guilford Pharmaceutical's Gliadel wafer for treating brain cancer be approved for marketing, but that its use be restricted to patients with the most severe and aggressive form of brain cancer.The FDA usually, but not always, follows the recommendations of its advisory panels.The recommendation for a restricted use for Gliadel sent shares of Guilford into a tailspin yesterday. They dropped almost 20 percent from Thursday's close to finish at $27.875 in very heavy trading.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1996
Guilford Pharmaceuticals, the Baltimore based biotechnology company, won final Food and Drug Administration approval yesterday to market a biodegradable wafer shown to prevent the rapid recurrence of a deadly form of brain cancer, the first new treatment approved for the disease in 20 years.Analysts hailed the approval as an important turning point for the growing biotechnology company, and Wall Street nodded its approval, sending Guilford's shares up $1.625, or 6 percent, to close yesterday at $29.25.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2001
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that its net loss more than doubled in the fourth quarter as it prepared to expand human testing of its drugs this year and raise spending on sales and marketing. But the Baltimore developer of biopharmaceuticals painted an upbeat picture, saying sales of its treatment for brain cancer were off to a good start in 2001. Guilford reported a fourth-quarter net loss of $11.6 million, or 49 cents a share, on revenue of $5.2 million. That compared with a net loss of $4.5 million, or 20 cents a share, on revenue of $8.2 million in the year-ago period.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1998
Baltimore-based Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that it has received government regulatory approvals to market its Gliadel treatment for malignant brain cancer in Canada and France.The Canadian Health Protection Branch and the French Drug Agency approved Gliadel for use in treating glioblastoma multiforme, a rapidly growing and one of the most fatal forms of brain cancer.Gliadel is a thin, dime-sized wafer that is loaded with a potent anti-cancer agent. Surgeons implant the wafers into cavities left in the brain after surgery to remove tumors.
NEWS
January 26, 2004
National Guardsmen and their families were honored at the Salute the Troops Dinner 2004 on Tuesday at the BG Thomas B. Baker Armory in Ellicott City. John Linderman, proprietor of Carrabba's Italian Grill in Ellicott City, had the idea for the dinner, which fed about 350 people and was organized by a community group, said Ellicott City resident John Wafer. "It wasn't a formal thing," Wafer said. "We all know each other ... and decided this needed to be done and decided to do it. Most of the people who were involved are Republicans ... [but]
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of its Gliadel wafer as a first-time treatment for malignant brain tumors, handing the Baltimore company a major victory after a series of hard-luck rejections that had shaken the faith of investors. The ruling, which came 11 months after the FDA had turned down the company's initial application for expanded use, will allow Guilford to market Gliadel to newly diagnosed brain cancer patients - a population that makes up at least two-thirds of the limited market for the treatment.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that its third-quarter loss widened to $14.6 million, a result largely of a layoffs-related charge and a decline in sales of its Gliadel treatment for brain cancer. The company's results were better than analysts had expected. The Baltimore company said its third-quarter revenue, nearly all of which came from Gliadel, fell to $3.3 million from $5.9 million a year earlier. Guilford described use of Gliadel by brain-cancer patients as "flat," but Chief Executive Officer Craig R. Smith said sales to distributors rose in last year's third quarter as the company stockpiled the chemotherapy-packed wafer on the incorrect assumption that the Food and Drug Administration was about to approve expanded use of it. Guilford said the loss amounted to 49 cents a share.
BUSINESS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2001
FREDERICK - On the pie chart of electrical production, solar power isn't even a sliver. "It's more like a line," said Harry B. Shimp, chief executive officer of BP Solar, which has a plant off Interstate 70 in Frederick. But the power crisis in California has increased interest in the silicon wafers that convert sunlight to electricity as a supplement to conventional power plant production. "It's gotten us to the table," Shimp said. "Before, when state governments talked about energy policy, they talked to gas and oil companies, coal companies, but not us. Now, they're talking to us."
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2001
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that its net loss more than doubled in the fourth quarter as it prepared to expand human testing of its drugs this year and raise spending on sales and marketing. But the Baltimore developer of biopharmaceuticals painted an upbeat picture, saying sales of its treatment for brain cancer were off to a good start in 2001. Guilford reported a fourth-quarter net loss of $11.6 million, or 49 cents a share, on revenue of $5.2 million. That compared with a net loss of $4.5 million, or 20 cents a share, on revenue of $8.2 million in the year-ago period.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that it has reacquired rights to sell and retain profits from its top product, a surgically implanted wafer that delivers a chemotherapy drug directly to the site of brain tumors. The Baltimore-based biopharmaceutical company said it bought back commercial rights to the Gliadel wafer from Aventis Pharma by issuing Aventis 300,000 shares of Guilford common stock, worth roughly $7.74 million at yesterday's closing price of $25.81. Guilford said it now has rights to market the drug everywhere except Scandinavia, where Orion Pharma sells it under an agreement with Guilford.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1998
Baltimore-based Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that it has received government regulatory approvals to market its Gliadel treatment for malignant brain cancer in Canada and France.The Canadian Health Protection Branch and the French Drug Agency approved Gliadel for use in treating glioblastoma multiforme, a rapidly growing and one of the most fatal forms of brain cancer.Gliadel is a thin, dime-sized wafer that is loaded with a potent anti-cancer agent. Surgeons implant the wafers into cavities left in the brain after surgery to remove tumors.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Losses for Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. tripled during the first quarter as the Baltimore-based start-up biotech company revved up its research and development spending.The company reported a net loss of $2.2 million, or 58 cents a share, compared with a loss of $636,000, or 32 cents a share, for the previous first quarter. Revenue for the company, which has sold no products, increased to $209,000 from $12,000, as the company earned more interest on its capital.Guilford, which was formed in July 1993 and has 59 workers, increased its research and development spending to $1.6 million during the quarter, compared with $333,000 for the same period a year ago.The company's stock yesterday closed at $5.375 a share, down 50 cents.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2006
Alzada Ross Hill of Silver Spring was looking for a recipe for a vanilla-wafer poundcake that she first made in the late 1960s. June Behm of Baltimore sent in a recipe that had been her mother's originally, and she felt certain it was the recipe Hill was searching for. While it's not technically a poundcake, this is an extremely dense, moist and delicious cake. It also keeps well and perhaps is even better the day after it is baked, when the flavors have blended. Linda Ensign of Salisbury, N.C., is looking for a recipe for salt-rising bread.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 31, 1998
Now that warm weather has arrived for good, my husband and I have opened our sun porch (which is shut during the winter months) and have spent the last several weeks relaxing and eating there. Opening our sun porch is always a signal to me that it is time to change to a more casual style of entertaining.This past weekend, for example, we invited friends from Paris, who were visiting their son at college, for wine and hors d'oeuvres on our porch. I baked Cumin Pepper Crisps, a new recipe in my files, for the occasion.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1998
Baltimore-based Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc., the French pharmaceuticals giant, said yesterday that they would move ahead with a large clinical trial of a chemotherapy-loaded wafer to see how effective it is in treating early brain cancer.The dissolvable wafer, Gliadel, is already marketed in the United States for treating a recurrent form of brain cancer known as glio-blastoma multiforme. It is one of the fastest-growing and most deadly types of brain cancer.
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