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BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1996
Youth Services International Inc. yesterday named as its chief executive officer a top official of a company that operates prisons. He replaces the founder of the Owings Mills-based firm.The appointment of Timothy P. Cole to supplant founder W. James Hindman comes after a recent plunge in YSI's common stock, from a high of $39.50 per share in April to a closing price yesterday of $17.50 per share.Five-year-old Youth Services operates 18 residential and community-based centers for 4,000 troubled youths in 11 states.
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NEWS
January 9, 2005
George R. Wackenhut, 85, a former FBI agent who built the Wackenhut Corp. into an international security firm that promoted the use of private guards at prisons, airports and nuclear power plants, died of heart failure Dec. 31 at his home in Vero Beach, Fla. Started in 1954 as a three-man detective agency in Miami, the struggling company turned to providing guard services to stay afloat and later earned contracts with Lockheed Martin and the Kennedy Space...
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NEWS
January 9, 2005
George R. Wackenhut, 85, a former FBI agent who built the Wackenhut Corp. into an international security firm that promoted the use of private guards at prisons, airports and nuclear power plants, died of heart failure Dec. 31 at his home in Vero Beach, Fla. Started in 1954 as a three-man detective agency in Miami, the struggling company turned to providing guard services to stay afloat and later earned contracts with Lockheed Martin and the Kennedy Space...
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
A 20-year-old Elkridge man who eluded authorities for eight days last summer after bolting from the Howard County District Court commissioner's office during a bond hearing was sentenced yesterday to a year in jail for the escape. "One thing that's overriding is there has to be a deterrent," Howard Circuit Judge Lenore R. Gelfman said before handing down the sentence to J.C. Porter. Porter, who pleaded guilty to the escape charge on Feb. 1, must serve the sentence after completing an 18-month term for resisting arrest in 1999.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
Howard County Police Chief Wayne Livesay said yesterday that a burglary suspect's recent short-lived escape from custody is a glaring example of why the county needs to stop transferring prisoners to Ellicott City for bail hearings, creating unnecessary costs and safety risks. For several years, Livesay said, he has requested that District Court judges appoint a bail commissioner to the Southern District, eliminating prisoner transfers altogether. Livesay said his oral and written requests have been turned down repeatedly.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1994
Senate backs interstate bankingThe Senate passed a bill yesterday to tear down decades-old barriers that limit banks from running branches across state lines, bringing coast-to-coast banking closer to reality after failed efforts dating to the mid-1980s.The House last month approved a similar measure, which would permit consumers to deposit checks and obtain loans wherever their hometown bank has a branch.Within a year of enactment, bank holding companies would be permitted to establish a bank in any state.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1996
Problems at several big corrections companies are to blame for a nearly 18 percent drop yesterday in the stock of Youth Services International, the Owings Mills operator of correctional academies and programs for young people, an analyst said.Youth Services stock dropped $4.75 to end the day at $22 on trading volume of 234,600 shares, compared with a three-month average daily volume of 154,463.Phil Fisher, an analyst with Genesis Merchant Group Securities in San Francisco, said "nothing has changed at the company" to justify the decline.
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpen for Knight Ridder | December 11, 1991
FPL Group"We continue to like FPL Group (FPL, NYSE, around $35), the holding company for Florida Power & Light," says Greg Smith of Prudential Securities."
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
A baggage screener at Baltimore-Washington International Airport has been arrested and charged with impersonating a police officer after security officials discovered him wearing his wife's Baltimore County police badge. William Darnell Jackson Jr., 36, of the 500 block of Molly Court in Edgewood, was also charged with making false statements during questioning by officials about 9:50 p.m. Wednesday in the airport's international terminal, Pier E. Airport officials are trying to determine Jackson's motives.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2000
A private security guard has been charged with assault, accused of pointing a handgun at the head of a shackled and unarmed suspect who was being escorted to the District Court building in Ellicott City. The guard, Mark A. Brown, 29, who was convicted in 1989 of a battery charge, could not be reached to comment on the November incident. Brown was employed by Wackenhut Corp., a worldwide private security firm that has been hired to take suspects from the Howard County police station to District Court in Ellicott City and the Detention Center in Jessup.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
A baggage screener at Baltimore-Washington International Airport has been arrested and charged with impersonating a police officer after security officials discovered him wearing his wife's Baltimore County police badge. William Darnell Jackson Jr., 36, of the 500 block of Molly Court in Edgewood, was also charged with making false statements during questioning by officials about 9:50 p.m. Wednesday in the airport's international terminal, Pier E. Airport officials are trying to determine Jackson's motives.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
Howard County Police Chief Wayne Livesay said yesterday that a burglary suspect's recent short-lived escape from custody is a glaring example of why the county needs to stop transferring prisoners to Ellicott City for bail hearings, creating unnecessary costs and safety risks. For several years, Livesay said, he has requested that District Court judges appoint a bail commissioner to the Southern District, eliminating prisoner transfers altogether. Livesay said his oral and written requests have been turned down repeatedly.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
A bail bond company has filed a libel suit against a competitor who alleged to the District Court that the company swaps favors to officials to get more bonds. The lawsuit, filed this week in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court by Paul J. Cox Sr. of Cox Bail Bonding stems from a Feb. 29 letter by Shirl Hirshauer, who owns ASAP Bail Bond. She asked the District Court to investigate what she alleges was preferential treatment granted to Cox's business by Anne Arundel County police; by Wackenhut Corp.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2000
A private security guard has been charged with assault, accused of pointing a handgun at the head of a shackled and unarmed suspect who was being escorted to the District Court building in Ellicott City. The guard, Mark A. Brown, 29, who was convicted in 1989 of a battery charge, could not be reached to comment on the November incident. Brown was employed by Wackenhut Corp., a worldwide private security firm that has been hired to take suspects from the Howard County police station to District Court in Ellicott City and the Detention Center in Jessup.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
Three Anne Arundel County police employees face punishment for letting a suspected thief, who should have been searched at least twice, enter the detention center in March apparently carrying a loaded semiautomatic weapon, police said.Officer Carol Frye, a police spokeswoman, said the punishment for violating administrative procedures could range from a letter of reprimand to dismissal.The employees could accept the punishment or appeal to a trial board of three officers.Frye said she could not identify the employees, confirm whether they are officers or release any details of the internal investigation that led the police force to file administrative charges against the employees yesterday.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
County police want to know how a suspect in a shoplifting case could have had a loaded semiautomatic handgun in his possession at the county Detention Center more than 12 hours after he was arrested, by which time police officers should have searched him at least twice, police say.Lt. Jeff Kelly, a police spokesman, said yesterday that the department's internal affairs division has targeted at least one officer, whom he could not identify, in its investigation.Andrew J. Hurajt III, 23, of the first block of Melrob Court in Annapolis was arrested just before 4 p.m. Sunday at Parole Plaza in Annapolis and taken to the Southern District station in Edgewater, where he was held for several hours, then taken before a District Court commissioner for an initial hearing, Kelly said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
A bail bond company has filed a libel suit against a competitor who alleged to the District Court that the company swaps favors to officials to get more bonds. The lawsuit, filed this week in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court by Paul J. Cox Sr. of Cox Bail Bonding stems from a Feb. 29 letter by Shirl Hirshauer, who owns ASAP Bail Bond. She asked the District Court to investigate what she alleges was preferential treatment granted to Cox's business by Anne Arundel County police; by Wackenhut Corp.
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